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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 1982-1983)"

VolLXJ^ No. 




urrent 




auce 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Tuesday, June 15, 1982 




Orze Airs Views 




Presidential Moving Days 

President and Mrs. Orze complete their move from 
Massachusetts to their new home here. Northwestern's 15th 
president officially took office on June 1. The photo illustrates 
that even university presidents have to endure the drudgery of 
moving day. Welcome to NSU. 



Northwestern's 15th President, Dr. 
Joseph Orze officially took office on 
June 1. The following is an interview 
conducted with the new President. 

Many people think there has been too 
much emphasis on athletics at NSU. 
How do you feel about that? 
It's been proven that when you have a 
winning football team you have a 
bigger enrollment the next year. It's 
probably the biggest recruiting tool 
you have. 

Do you plan to make anymore cuts in 

the athletic department? 

I don't plan to cut the athletic 

department at all because it's such an 

important department, and the way 

people see it is a direct reflection on the 

University. 

Do you plan any other personnel 
changes in the faculty? 
I didn't come here with the idea of 
firing anybody. With Coach Williams, 
I felt it was necessary in order to give 
the people involved fair notice. 
On a KNWD talk show you said ihat 
your Massachuetts campus had just 
instituted a Pub on campus. How 
would you feel about a Pub at NSU? 
We found it was a far better situation 
with a Pub on campus in a controlled 
atmosphere. It was a beer, wine, and 
pizza situation. It has alot of ad- 
vantages. There may be some political 
and religious problems to overcome, 
but it is my personal feeling that I'd 
rather have them (students) on cam- 
pus, than being somewhere and driving 
home drunk, maybe wrapping their car 
around a tree. 

Many students are concerned with 
what the administration is doing to 
keep them after they enroll. Also, 
what is being done to recruit new 
students? 

I intend to have an active recruitment 
program, in and out of the state. 
Retention is the other side of the coin. 
The biggest thing is having people who 
are interested and concerned and who 
express it. NSU is not unique in this 



problem. Less than 40 percent of kids 
who enter college graduate within five 
years. We have to address the problem 
and face it as best we can... A real 
problem is campus enrollment. The 
largest enrollment is off campus, and 
we need to bring on campus enrollment 
up, while keeping off campus 
enrollment up. We are going to have 
to develop a rather intense recruiting 
program. The key to monies is the key 
to what you can and can't do, and 
students determine that. 
What about the 'Good Ole Boy'? 
Many people say that is what kind of 
politics we have here. 
What's best for the University is what 
is going to be done. Everything else 
comes second. I'm a very easy going 
person, but I have no difficulty making 
tough decisions. I don't expect a 
bunch of yes men, because they're not. 
going to help me. 

I realize that with responsibility goes 
authority. I hope I have the wisdom to 
quickly realize who can and who can't 
handle it. 

I've just started my eighth year as 
President. I have enough battle scars 
so that I no longer worry about the 
little things. As president there is 
always somebody to be shot at, and 
they always shoot at the top. 

There are two words that I like to 
use; excellence and integrity. You have 
got to get people to strive for ex- 
cellence, whether athletic or academic, 
but achieve it so that you're not only 
excellent, but you're proud of it. 
Many people are optimistic about you 
and expect to see great things at this 
University. 

Well, keep the high hopes. But as an 
individual I can't do anything but 
become an effective leader. In order to 
do that, I must find ways of getting 
people to do what they want to do. If 
everybody wants to see this University 
succeed, then we can succeed. 
So you aren't God. 

No, I can only walk across water if 
there are enough rocks. 



Sights, Sounds, History of Louisiana Slated For Folk Festival 



So you thought the summer in 
Natchitoches would be dull! Where 
else but Natchitoches can you hear folk 
music of the quality of the old 
Louisiana Hay Ride days, or see a craft 
that represents every ethnic region of 
Louisiana? The answer is right here at 
NSU at the third annual Natchitoches 
Folk Festival in Prather Coliseum on 
July 16-18. 

Hundreds of folk musicians, 
craftsmen and storytellers will share 
centuries-old folkways with more than 
20,000 visitors to the campus from 
around the nation. 



The Festival is produced by the 
Louisiana Folklife Center at NSU and 
is committed to documenting and 
preserving our rapidly disappearing 
cultural heritage. 

The 16-18 is the nucleus of the 
"biggest entertainment weekend in the 
267-year history of Natchitoches." 
Music shows will feature Blues, 
"Honky Tonk", Bluegrass, Cajun and 
14 other music groups. 

For those students interested in 
working in Louisiana's industry, this 



year's festival focuses on the gigantic 
oil and gas industry. A special exhibit 
features tools, photographs, and 
artifacts that date from Black Gold's 
beginning. 

By the way, NSU's students should 
fit right into the festivities. Festival 
Media Relations Director Jim Johnson 
says, "That's why we put this show on 
...to get the young people." 

The Festival has been nationally 
acclaimed by organizations and 
publications for its efforts to preserve 
the state's music and musical styles, 



foods and ways of cooking, as well as 
old-time crafts, folk narratives, tools 

and machines. The sights, sounds and 
history of Louisiana's folk arts can be 
enjoyed during the Festival's four 
sessions. 

Good food, good music, and in- 
teresting exhibits, this could be a NSU 
student's dream come true. The best 
part is that admission is $4 for adults, 
$2 for students, and children under 10 
are admitted free. Ticket books of- 
fering savings are $10 for visitors and 
$6 for students. 



Page 2 



S 

Notes 



This summer NSU seems to be full 
of new faces. There's a new face in the 
President's office, and even the 
Current Sauce has a new face, for that 
matter, a whole new bod. I hope that 
you enjoy the new look, and I'll let you 
in on a secret. This is a unique op- 
portunity for you as students to make 
your very own newspaper. We will be 
trying different styles, as well as 
different columns. So if you see 
something you like, or even something 
you don't like, drop us a line. 
Remember we are short on space with 
only three issues this summer, so make 
the letters short and sweet. 

The optimisim seems to be high on 
campus, and the Current Sauce is on a 
natural high also. We have a great 
staff, and we're looking forward to the 
best summer in the Sauce's history. 

Something to look forward to is the 
Sauce's hand in recruiting. Next issue 
will include a High School tabloid, 
which will be sent to high school 
students around the state. This modest 
effort in attracting new students is 
being done by the J-305 class. All the 
student organizations will want to be 
sure and get an ad in this special 
edition. 

Remember, no trip to the Complex is 
complete without the SAUCE. 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 

Editor 
Sonja Henry 
Managing Editor 
Bonnie Lawson 
Business Manager 
Cay Kelly 
Sports Editors 
Tammy Curry 
Roger Reynolds 
Photographer 
Melody Busby 
Columnist 
Joe Cunningham 

Advertising Manager 
Melinda Moore 

Advisor 
Franklin Presson 



Current Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Nalchiloches Times. Highway I 
South. Natchitoches. Louisiana 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is 357-5456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are 14 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 
Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of ihe 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter lor journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU, Natchitoches, Louisiana, 71457. 



S tu «. 



Editorials and (Commentary 



Tuesday. June 15. 1982 



By Joe Cunningham 



The news of the termination of A.L. 
Williams' contract as head football 
coach and athletic director at NSU 
came as no surprise to anybody who 
knows anything about local politics. 
Everyone even remotely associated 
with the situation just knew that as 
soon as NSU got its new president, 
W illiams would be looking for a new 
job. Well, it happened, and folks, 
that's Louisiana politics. 

A.L. Williams was not fired because 
of his record here. A.L. Williams' 
contract was terminated because he 
didn't pass around the money dish like athletic director 
some people-thought he should. 

Now I'm not going to pretend to 
think that I know all of the facts here. 
I don't. But several people in the 
athletic administration felt that they 
weren't being given a fair shake with 
the money situation, and this 
ultimately brought about the end of 
A.L. William's career here. 

The spring sports staff was especially 
discontented. Maybe they had a right 
to be. NSU's tennis team has con- 
sisently ranked among the very best in 
the South and this year were invited to 
a prestigious post season tournament 
in Monroe. 



Radical 

R 



The track team has been ranked in 
the top twenty in the nation for the 
second year in a row, and coach Jerry 
Dyes has produced 10 Ail-Americans in 
that time. This is good publicicty for 
the University. But, there's one un- 
derlying fact centering around all of 
NSU's spring sports, including the 
aforementioned; they don't bring NSU 
any more money. And isn't money the 
very root of the problem anyway? 
How ironic! 

A.L. Williams, like all good 
businessmen (and believe me, an 
IS a businessmen) 
invested his money where it could 
make the most return. If more money 
was dished out to the football team, 
it's because they bring in the most 
money back to the athletic department. 
And as proud as we are of the NSU 
track team, and their coach, how many 
of us have ever PAID to get into a 
track meet? 

Everybody around the state of 
Louisiana knows that Northwestern is 
short on money. And the athletic 
department more so. I wonder how 
many people know that the athletic 
department got nothing (zero, zip, the 
big goose egg) from the $200,000 given 
to us as part of the deal for playing 
Northeast on T.V. two years ago? 

All that money went to paying off a 
debt that the school owed. A.L. 
Williams had no control over that. 
This decision was made over his head 
and there was nothing he could do 
about it. 



The athletic department never has 
had the money neccessary to satisfy 
every changeshe wants. A.L. Williams 
was fighting a losing battle all along. 
But he had too much character to quit. 

And at the risk of sounding 
knowledgeable beyond my years, I feel 
compelled to make this comment. I've 
been around and subjected to all kinds 
of coaches in my young life. From 
little league baseball when I was four, 
to church league basketball to high 
school football and adult league 
softball as a player; to covering NSU 
sports as Sports Editor of the SAUCE, 
to being taught by them in the 
classroom and on the field. I've 
known them as friends, and of course, 
as enemies. And I swear, I've never 
known a finer man, or a classier person 
than A.L. Williams. 

When reporters from Channel 3 in 
Shreveport came down and put the 
lights on him, A.L. Williams didn't shy 
away and give them a "no comment". 
He looked right into the camera, didn't 
point an accusing finger at anybody, he 
just said that while he was here, he 
enjoyed it. 

I sincerely hope that in his last year 
at the helm of NSU football, A.L. 
Williams takes the Demons to a 
Number 1 ranking in NCAA Division 
1-AA. I hope the Demons are 14-0 
with playoff wins. And I hope most of 
all, that the people who were 
responsible for A.L. Williams 
departure, are sorry as hell that they 
didn't keep him. 



(Students lie on the banks of scenic 

Chaplin's Lake) 

He - Boy it's really hot. I'm almost 

tempted to jump into the lake. 

She - You must be hot. In fact your 

brain must be fried to even think of 

jumping into the 'sludge swamp'. 

He - It really is too bad we can't swim 

in here. I heard that they used to swim 

right about where the water treatment 

plant is dumping. Even Mayor Joe 

said he swam here. 

She - What a change, first he swam in 
it, now he dumps in it. 
He - Give the man credit. He did try. 
It's just that nobody seems to be able 
to do anything more than try. Year 
after year the dumping goes on. 
She - Hey, maybe the new President 
can get something done. They say he is 
a real doer, what was that he said a few 
months ago, "Reach for the stars and 
maybe you can get to the moon". A 
man like that could get them to stop. 

(Scene fades to two passengers in a car. 

Massacussetts license plates identify 
the travelers as newcomers.) 

She - 1 really am excited about our new 
home. I know I'll just love the people 
and the town and most of all the house. 



I can just imagine the southern 
scenery. And our home will be right in 
the middle of it all, a part of 
everything. 



He - Well, dear, I've been meaning to 

talk to you about that. The scenery I 

mean. You see, well, I mean... 

She - What is it? If it's the house we 

can fix it. A little paint, a few flowers, 

that can do wonders for the looks of a 

place. 

He - It's not actually the house. It's 
the lake. There's a lake across the 
street. 

She - A lake. Is that all? I know, 
swimmers at all hours of the night, 
flooding in the winter. Right, that is it 
isnt't it dear? 

He - Well actually it isn't the lake that 
is the problem. It's what's in it. And 
island, there's an island in the lake. 
She - How quaint. The kids can swim 
over and have picnics on it. Why were 
you worried... 

He - No! No swimming to the island. 
It isn't your everyday island, this one is 
made out of sludge. 

She - Sludge. Suddenly I hope sludge is 

a southern type of dirt. 

He - No, it's sediment from a water 

treatment plant across the lake. 

She - Sewage. Oh Lord, we're living 

across from a sewage island. 

He - Not sewage, sediment. 

She - Sediment, sewage, it's all the 

same thing. How can we live with a 

sewage island right in our front yard? 
We'll just have to move because I 
refuse to send postcards back home 
showing the beautiful southern sewage 



islands we live in. I can see it now, 
"Having a wonderful time, wish you 
were here. The large island in the 
background is not sludge". 
He - We can't move. I'm the 
President, and that is the President's 
house. How would you feel about 
Reagan if he refused to live in the 
White House? 

She - Well then you'll have to ask them 
to pump somewhere else. 
He - Nobody else will let them pump 
around them. Would you want them 
to pump in your backyard? 

She - Better their backyard than my 

frontyard. What can we do? 

He - Well, the mayor had a great plan 

to keep the sludge in tanks and then 
bury it, but the state wouldn't give 
them the funds to do it. I figure that 
the Governor's election is only a few 
years away, and since I hear a 

Democrat is a shoe-in for the job we're 
nome free. A democrat will give tnem 
the money, and good-by island. 
She - A few YEARS? Can't you just 
call the mayor and ask him to stop 
making islands in our front yard? 
He - It isn't that easy. Let me think 
about it. I'm sure there must be some 
solution... 
(Scene fades...) 

Welcome home, President Orze. We 
wish you the best. In fact we're 
counting on it. 



Tuesday, June 15, 1982 



Page 3 



Turnover In Administration 



The count is up to four NSU ad- 
ministrators who have officially an- 
nounced plans to leave NSU, in the 
wake of the new President's first two 
weeks in office. Leaving are Director 
of Athletics A.L. Williams, Vice- 
President of University Affairs Morris 
Bass, Dean of Business David 
Townsend, and Director of the Lignite 
Institute John Wascom. 

Head football coach and athletic 
director A.L. Williams announced last 
week that his contract would be ter- 
minated in July of 1983. President 
Orze said the decision was made 
because it was in the best interests of 
the university "to resolve the athletic 
situation. . ." 

During Williams five year term as 
head coach, Northwestern has had an 
overall record of 32 victories and 41 
losses. 

In other announcements, Vice- 
President Morris Bass resigns effective 
on July 16, after a two year service. 

Bass said he is resigning "for per- 
sonal reasons" and will return to his 
homestate of Tennessee. The resigning 
vice-president plans to become 
Business Manager for the Shelby State 
Community College in Memphis. 

When asked why he chose to resign 
at this time, Bass said, "It was just a 
good time." 

Dean David Townsend announced 
his retirement as Dean of the College 
of Business as of July 1. Townsend 
said his retirement from the Louisiana 
Teaching System is "a personal 
decision, basically a result of the most 
generous retirement system in the 
country." 

Townsend plans to serve as 
professor of economics as Sam 
Houston University in Huntsville, 
Texas. 



The 18 year Business Dean of NSU 
said he was optimistic about the college 
of business growth in the university. 
Townsend said he felt the new ad- 
ministration would have a leaner, more 
cost-effective budget which would 
allow for a raise in faculty salaries, 
greatly aiding the business college. 

Townsend said the business college 
had been hurt in the past because the 
salaries had not been attractive enough 
to hire doctorate faculty. 

Townsend came to NSU in 1963 and 
became the Dean of Applied Arts and 
Sciences, which then included a 
business department, industrial 
science, agriculture, and home 
economics. 

Townsend said the college of 
business has grown rapidly , almost 
doubling it's undergraduate enrollmet 
within the last nine years. 
"I guess I've been the only dean of the 
college of business because I was here 
when it was formed," said Townsend. 

Townsend returns to teach in Texas 
after a 20 year absence. The dean said, 
"I guess I received my baptism to 
higher education in Texas-" He taught 
at Stephen F. Austin University, 
University of Texas, and University of 
Houston before teaching at NSU. 

The last official retirement, that of 
Lignite Institute Director John 
Wascom, becomes effective June 30. 
"My retirement has nothing to do with 
. the new president," said Wascom, 
adding, "If I were going to continue to 
teach, this is where I'd stay." 

The retiring director of the Lignite 
Institute said he felt, "Students over 
the years can injest less than when I 
started teaching, they have less of an 
interest in learning, but there has been 
no lack of intelligence." 

Wascom stated his plans to continue 
traveling this country and Canada, 




speaking on the subject of parenting. 

The director also said he may open a 
Geophysical and Geological firm. 

The Lignite Institute, which was set 
up two years ago by Wascom is a first 
at NSU. The Institute has since intered 
a consortium with Louisiana Tech, 
Northeast, and Grambling. Wascom 
said the consortium is "a first as 
sciences are concerned." 

No replacement has yet been named 
to the Institute. 

Wascom expressed concern with the 
education system, but said the fault 



was with parents, not with universities. 

He added, "They (universities) are too 
concerned with their own survival and 
not primarily with students, although 
you would have difficulty in getting 
anyone to admit it." 

In Wascom's 18 years he served as 
head of the only department of 
Geology ever on campus from 1967-72, 
had a four year research contract with 
NASA, headed the department of 
Agriculture and Geological sciences 
from 1977-80, and directed the Lignite 
Institute from 1980-82. 




Complex Sunbathers 



Students bask in the sun in the privacy of NSU's Recreation complex. In ad- 
dition to an Olympic sized swimming pool, the Complex offers four tennis 
courts and a nine-hole golf course. Admission is free with a full-time NSU I.D. 



Help For You... 

SPECIAL SERVICES is a program 
designed to help you make it through 
college. We try to provide help that 
meets your individual needs: 
TUTORING, COUNSELING, AND 
A PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 
CLASS. These major services are 
offered on the Natchitoches Campus 
and Shreveport Campus. 



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 100 
- will help you to develop com- 
munication skills, to understand 
yourself and others, and to apply this 
knowledge to your studies and 
everyday activities. 



COUNSELING - helps you to learn 
more about yourself. You may talk to 
a counselor if you need information 
about college, careers, financial aid, 
testing or if you want to discuss per- 
sonal problems. 

TUTORING - if you are having 
trouble in class or if you want to avoid 
trouble, come by and we will assign 
you a tutor and schedule regular 
tutoring sessions. 



Page 4 



c 



ampus 



Briefs 



Tuesday, June 15. 1982 



A First For NSU 



Stamey Elected To Board of Trustees 



Joe Stamey of Natchitoches, 
president of the Student Government 
Association at Northwestern State 
University, has been elected as the 
state's student representative on the 
Board of Trustees for Louisiana 
Colleges and Universities. 

As one of the 18 voting members of 
the management board, Stamey will 
represent the students and. SGA of- 
ficials of the nine colleges and 
universities operating under the Board 
of Trustees system. 

The senior accounting major at NSU 
will begin his one-year term on June 1, 
when he will receive full voting 
privileges and be appointed to com- 
mittees of the Board of. Trustees. 
Stamey succeeds Cornell Martin, SGA 
president at Nicholls State. University 
in Thibodeaux as the student 
representative on the board: 

Stamey was elected to the Board of 
Trustees during the May 15 meeting in 
Baton Rouge of the Council of Student 
Government Association Presidents 



for State Colleges and Universities. He 
is the first SGA president from 
Northwestern to be elected to the ( 
position. 

Recently chosen for a second term as 
SGA president at Northwestern, the 
new Board of Trustees member is a 
1979 graduate of St. Mary's High 
School. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Owen Stamey of Natchitoches. 

Stamey, who has maintained a 3.72 
grade-point average, has also served 
the Northwestern SGA as a senator-at- 
large and president pro tern of the 
Student Senate in 1980-81 and as a 
freshman class senator in 1979-80. 

The NSU senior is a member of 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity, Phi Kappa 
Phi academic honor society and Phi 
Eta Sigma national honor society for 
sophomore men of high academic 
standing. He was Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Sorority's Man of the Year in 1981-82 
and served as president of the NSU 
Interfraternity Council in 1980-81 . 

In addition to his studies at Nor- 



thwestern, Stamey is a part-time teller 
for Exchange Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of Natchitoches. 




Donation Received By NSU Ag. Department 



Johnny Jefcoat of Scott, La., who 
owns the internationally-known 
Double J Ranch, has donated to 
Northwestern State University 25 vials 
of semen from his bull that sired the 
American Brahman Breeders 
Association's 1981 national champion 
bull. 

The donaton from one of the top 
Brahman herds in the world was made 
to NSU's Agriculture Department to 
help improve the quality of its large 
Brahman herd, which the university 



Acquired recently from the Louisiana 
Department of Corrections. 

The semen given to NSU is from 
Sugarland's Poncrata 100 5287 (ABBA 
No. 260243). The 2,150-pound bull is 
the sire of JJ Poncrata 276 (ABBA No. 
305990), judged the 1981 national 
champion bull. He is also the sire of 
the 1981 national champion producer 
of dam. 

"John Jefcoat and his Double J 
Ranch have one of the elite, proven 
sires in the world," stated Dr. Jack 



Williamson Receives Award 



Northwestern State University senior 
Marti Williamson of Natchez is this 
year's winner of tr»e prestigious Mabel 
Lee Walton Leadership Award, the 
highest individual collegiate honor 
presented annually by the national 
Sigma Sigma Sigma Social Sorority. 

Miss Williamson, an accounting 
major, was recognized for the out- 
standing leadership which she provided 
In Northwestern's Alpha Zeta chapter, 
which won the Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Chapter Excellence Award in 1980-81. 

As the recipient of the Mabel Lee 
Walton Award, the NSU senior will 
chair Sigma Sigma Sigma's national 
collegiate advisory board for 1982-83. 
She previously represented Nor- 
thwestern on the board after NSU had 
won the Chapter Excellence Award. 

Miss Williamson, who served as the 
NSU sorority's president in 1981, is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Williamson. She is a 1979 graduate of 
St. Mary's High School in Nat- 
chitoches. 

She attended the 1980 Louisiana 
Convention of Sigma Sigma Sigma and 
led her chapter in hosting the area's 
Regional Leadership School in the fall 
of 1981. 




Pace, head of the Agriculture 
Department at NSU. "Because of his 
interest and generosity, Northwestern 
can now substantially upgrade its 
Brahman breeding program." 

Jefcoat, who is recognized as a 
producer of herd bulls and purebred 
herd sires, does not sell his bulls' semen 
to anyone in the United States. Semen 
from the Double J Ranch's bulls is sold 
only to producers in Hondures, 
Venezuela, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, 
the Dominican Republic, Austrailia 
and other nations. 

The Double J Ranch is a small, 
intensely performance-tested herd 
bred for longer, taller and 
more heavily-muscled Brahman cattle 
without losing the most desirable trait 
of production. 

* Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale 



An academic honor student who is 
maintaining a 3.9 average, Miss 
Williamson has also served as vice- 
president of Alpha Lambda Delta 
freshman fraternity and is a member of 
Beta Gamma Psi and Phi Kappa Phi. 

She is listed in Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and 
Colleges and is an active member in the 
Purple Jackets honorary service 
organization for women at Nor- 
thwestern and has participated in the 
university's summer orientation 
program for incoming freshmen. 



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Piano Camp 
Set For June 



A summer piano camp for musicians 
in junior and senior high schools will 
be conducted June 20-23 by the 
Department of Music and School for 
the Creative and Performing Arts at 
Northwestern State University. 

Offering students informative 
musical experiences, the four-day 
summer program will include a lecture- 
slide presentation on Haydn and the 
classical era, a seminar on practice 
techniques, sessions in piano literature 
and theory, two private lessons and a 
master piano class. 

Camp faculty members, who 
specialize in piano performance, will 
be Jeanine LaGrone Smith, assistant 
professor of piano at NSU and the 
camp coordinator; Dr. Edward Rath, 
associate professor of piano and head 
of the Music Department at NSU, and 
studio teachers Glenda Bates of 
Ringgold and Wanelle Lowe of 
Pineville. 

Mrs. Smith said the summer camp 
will be highlighted by a final recital to 
be presented by junior and senior high 
school pianists participating in the 
program. 

Camp awards will include the Bach 
Award for junior high pianists, the 
Beethhoven Award for pianists in 
grades 9-11 and the Chopin Award for 
pianists entering their senior year of 
high school. 

The camp coordinator said all 
students are asked to bring two 
prepared music pieces, preferably 
memorized, and one piece still in 
progress. 

Fees for the camp will be $75 if 
received on or before June 14. If 
payment is made at camp registration, 
the registration fee will be $80. A $5 
advance registration fee must be 
submitted with the application, which 
must be received by June 14. 

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uesday, June 15, 1982 



Page 5 



Askew Named Officer of the Year 



Walter Askew Jr., a member of the 
Northwestern State University campus 
jolice force, has been selected as the 
.ouisiana University Police Officer of 
he Year. 

Askew, who was chosen earlier this 
ipring as the University Police Officer 
if the Year at Northwestern, will 
ittend the LUPA convention July 29- 
10 in Lake Charles, where he will 
■eceive the plaque and cash award that 
iccompany the statewide honor. A 
otating trophy to be placed in NSU's 
)olice department for one year will 
ilso be presented during the con- 
tention. 



The Louisiana University Police 
Officer of the Year Award was 
established in 1981 in an effort to 
upgrade university police personnel 
across the state. The 1983 competition 
will be hosted by Northwestern. 

Askew, who was on active duty with 
the U.S. Air Force from 1967 to 1976, 
joined the University Police force at 
Northwestern in 1976. He was a line 
officer for four years and has been 
shift supervisor or officer-in-charge of 
special assignments for the past two 
years. 



A native of North Carolina, Askew 
is currently enrolled in the law en- 
forcement curriculum at Nor- 
thwestern. He will earn an associate 
degree in law enforcement next fall. 



The movies for this summer 
are -as follows: 

June 18 Dogs of War 
June 25 The Spy Who Loved Me 
July 9 True Confessions 
July 16 Caveman 



Adopt A Gorilla? 



"Man has so rapidly altered the 
environment that animals rarely are 
able to change and adapt to these new 
conditions." But through man's 
compassion and support, the world's 
animals will be able to take refuge in 
naturalistic homes in zoos such as 
Audubon's. In order to provide homes 
for these endangered animals, 
Audubon Zoo is launching an Adopt- 
An-Audubon-Animal program, 
explained Audubon Park Director L. 
Ronald Forman. 

As in similar programs in other zoos 
around the nation, donors are able to 
provide for the general support of their 
adopted species through contributions 
ranging from $15 for animals such as 
tree shrews or rabbits, to $5,000 for a 
gorilla. 

A tax-deductible adoption fee gives 
Zoo-Parents a choice in adopting an 
Audubon Animal for a year. The fee ! 



helps the Zoo provide for the special 
diet and care the animals need. 

When a person adopts an animal, 
the individual's name will be placed on 
the Zoo-Parents Honor Roll plaque, 
located on the Zoo grounds. They'll 
afso receive a personalized Adoption 
Certificate for their animal, a Zoo- 
Parent bumper sticker, and an iron-on 
Zoo-Parent T-Shirt emblem. Zoo 
Parents can exercise their visiting rights 
each Fall during a special Zoo-Parents 
Party. 

Individuals, as well as civic groups, 
businesses, school groups and com- 
munity organizations are invited to 
participate in this program. Adoptive 
parents will learn about individual 
species and play a vital role in con- 
serving endangered animals threatened 
in the wild. 




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There has been a limited amount of 
mumps vaccine made available for all 
age groups. This vaccine will be ad- 
ministered on a first come first serve 
basis. 

Usually mumps is a mild disease. 
However, it may occasionally be severe 
and produce serious complications. 

Past Governor 
Heads Program 

Former Governor Jimmie H. Davis 
will headline a country music program 
at Rebel State Commemorative Area 
on Saturday, June 19. The program, 
which begins at 6:30 p.m., is 
cosponsored by the Louisiana Office 
°f State Parks and the Rebel Memorial 
Committee in Many. 

Committee Chairman and Program 
Coordinator Robert Gentry said that 
•he event will also feature the Birdwell 
Brothers from Marthaville, the 
Lightfoot Gospel Singers of Many, and 
tn e group God's Country from 
Leesville. 

He added that a concession stand 
with food and soft drinks will be 
Mailable. Admission will be $3.00 for 
adults and $1 .00 for children under 12. 

Rebel State Commemorative Area is 
'ocated 25 miles west of Natchitoches 
°n Louisiana Highway 1221. It will 
ev entually contain Louisiana's country 
^iisic museum which is set to open in 
1?83. Rebel is also the site of the grave 
°f .the Unknown confederate Soldier. 



Immunization clinics are scheduled 
at the Natchitoches Parish Health 
Unit, every Monday and Tuesday from 
8:00 a.m. and from 10:00 p.m. to 3.30 
p.m. 



ATTENTION 

SUGB is sponsoring a trip on 
June 26 to Six Flags over Texas 
Transportation is free to full-time 
students, $ 3 00 for part-time 
students. Tickets are $ 11 95 . 
Departing NSU at 5:00 am, 
departing Six Flags at 8:00 pm. 
Sign up in 214 SU. First 28 
people only. 



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Page 6 



Tuesday, June 15. I 1 



Adams ToSpeakAtWritersConference Staff Seeks 

Former Edito 
Of Potpourri 



Ezra Adams, managing editor 
of the Northwestern State University 
Press, has been invited to speak 
Friday, June 10, at the second annual 
Northwest Louisiana Writers Con- 
ference in Shreveport. 

Adams, who is also a professor of 
journalism at NSU, will address 
conference participants on the topic, 
"Laws for Lusty Writers." His 
presentation is scheduled for 9:45 p.m. 
at the Regency Motor Hotel. 

The Northwest Louisiana Writers 
conference, which is being conducted 



June 10-12, is held annually to 
promote and encourage individuals 
interested in or engaged in the art of 
writing in its various forms. 

A member of the editorial advisory 
board for Forest and People Magazine, 
Adams is an Honorary Fellow of the 
Anglo-American Academy and has 
served for several years as adviser for 
Northwestern's campus chapter of the 
Society of Professional Journalists, 
Sigma Delta Chi. In 1977, he was 
appointed Louisiana director for 
Sigma Delta Chi. 




The Northwestern professor has 
been on the university's faculty since 
1969 and previously served for 16 years 
in daily news reporting and editing 
positions and in public relations. 

For five years, he edited "Rural 
Louisiana," the official publication of 
the Louisiana Association of Electric 
Cooperatives. His professional ex- 
perience also includes serving as public 
information officer for the State 
Department of agriculture and public 
relations director for the East Baton 
Rouge Parish Parks and recreation 
Commission. 

NSF Fee 
Initiated 

A $5.00 Returned Check Fee will be 
assessed for each check returned from 
the Bank to the University, except in 
the case of a bank error. 

Check privileges will be cancelled for 
anyone who has had three checks 
returned within an academic year. 

Check privileges will be reinstated the 
next academic year provided all 
previous returned checks are paid. 
Academic year is defined as the Fall 
Semester through the Summer Session. 

Effective date is May 25, 1982. 



Rc 



The POTPOURRI staff is seel 1 
the names and current addresses 
phone numbers of all former editor 
the yearbook. 

Ed Dupuis, current editor (1 
edition), and his staff plan to obsi 
the yearbook's 75th anniversry wii 
Homecoming Banquet on Fri 
night, September 24, 1982 for all 
editors who can attend. 



"We want to make personal con 
soon by correspondence and/or ph 
with as many of the former editor 
possible," Dupuis said recently, 
are anxious to learn where all the Hi 
POTPOURRI editors are as quick! 
possible, so we can begin to give tl 
details of the special event and 
special edition." 

Dupuis, a pre-dental student, is 1] 
this summer with plans for, 
execution of preparations to publ 
the 1983 yearbook, the 75th 
niversary edition. 

He said all former POTPOUI 
editors and other alumni can writ 
him or the staff adviser, Ezra Ada 
at NSU Box 5245, Natchitoches 
71457. His office phone is 318' 
5026, and Adams can be reac 
through 318-357-4586. 



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ROTC 
Training 

Begins 

The Senior Army ROTC Advanced 
Summer Camp began June 2 and will 
continue through July 21, according to 
Lt. Col. Walter Harris, professor of 
military science and director of the 
ROTC at Northwestern. 

Thirty-one members of the Senior 
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps 
at Northwestern State University are 
participating this summer in six weeks 
of intensive training at Fort Riley, 
Kansas. 

The summer training program at 
Fort Riley includes such activities as 
map reading, military tactics, 
marksmanship with various weapons, 

and extensive leadership course, first 
aid, escape and evasion training, 
physical training, leadership reaction 
course, communications training, land 
navigation, water training, survival 
training, land mine demonstrations 
and military skills. 




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Page 7 



orts 



Rogers 
Review 

Fall Recruiting in Question 

While everbody has been talking 
about the firing of NSU Head Coach 
and Athletic Director A.L. Williams, I 
wonder one thing: Has anybody really 
sat down and thought what Nor- 
thwestern will do next fall when 
recruiting time comes around? How can 
you hire a new head coach before 
recuiting starts with him not knowing a 
thing about the players or what the 
team will need? People need to start 
thinking about these last two 
questions, they are important to 
everyone concerned. 

A lame-duck head coach can be 
compared to a lame-duck President of 
the United States, you are just biding 
time. A lame-duck coach makes no big 
decisions. This makes recruitinga little 
bit harder because everyone knows the 
present coach will not be there, but 
they don't know who will be. 

How can a football player coming 
out of high school make a decision on 
going to college when they don't know 
who the head coach is, or what kind of 
program he will institute? The last 
question that comes to mind is: Is 
Coach Williams the only one fired or 
are all the assistants gone also? No one 
knows this answer but Dr. Orze and 
maybe the assistant coaches. This 
would add a little more to the problem 
of recruiting, during the 1982-83 
football season. 

My advice to everyone is, ' et ' s just 
sit back and see how all involved in the 
Northwestern State Football program 
come out of this one. Who knows, we 
might all be surprised 



Demons Place In Nation's Top 20 



News Bureau LA-For the second 
straight year the Northwestern State 
track and field team placed in the top 
20 in the nation after scoring 24 team 
points while placing in four events at 
the NCAA national meet last week in 
Provo, Utah. 

The Demons tied for the 20th spot 
with the University of Arizona after 
placing 11th in the nation last Spring. 
This year the Demons claimed a second 
place in the 400-meter relay, a fifth 
shot put and 11th place 
both the javelin and 



place in the 
finishes in 
decathlon. 



Exam 



-7 



Please make note in the next issue of 
the Current Sauce that the Health and 
PE Department will have Special 
Examinations Monday, June 28, 1982 
at 9:00 a.m. ad 4:00 p.m. in the PE 
Majors Building. 



The relay team did not defend the 
title it won a year ago, but it wasn't 
because of a lack of effort. The 
Demon foursome set a school and 
a national meet record unt il 
Houston won the finals with a record 
time of 38.53. 

Also for the second straight year 
Northwesten had five athletes earn Ail- 
American honors. Senior Mark Duper 
and sophomore Mario Johnson both 
earned Ail-American status for the 
second straight year as members of the 
relay team. Freshman Edgar 
Washington and sophomore Ray 
Brown both earned the honor for the 
first time. Sophomore John Campbell 
also earned All- American status for the 
first time with his fifth place finish in 
the shot put. 

Campbell was sixth in the qualifying 
for the shot put finals and then moved 
up to the fifth spot with a school 
record throw of 65-8 Vi. The fifth 
place finish was an improvement for 
Campbell over his ninth place finish 
earlier in the year at the indoor 
championships. 

"I thought John Campbell came a 
long way this Spring," added Dyes. 
"He's still just a sophomore and he 
improved with just about every meet. 
He wanted to get to 66 feet at the 
nationals, but he did very well for his 
first outdoor championships." 



Sophomore Steve Stockton placed 
11th in the javelin competition with a 
throw of 245-10 to place in the national 
finals for the second straight year. 
Last Spring Stockton earned Ail- 
American honors by placing third in 
the national meet with a school record 
252-10. 

The big surprise for the Demons 
came from Rick Schweitzer in the final 
two weeks of the season. The junior 
from Deridder qualified for the 
decathlon just one week before the 
national meet and then placed 11th in 
the nation to score two team points. 

"Rick did very well at the end of the 
season," said Coach Jerry Dyes. "It 
was a great effort for him to qualify 
for the national meet. But then he just 
didn't have the time he needed to be 
rested. On the second day at the 



NCAA meet you could see the 
fatigue." 

Overall Dyes was fairly pleased with 
the results of the Demons at the NCAA 
meet. "1 didn't really know how we 
would do out there," stated Dyes. 
"The relay team ran well and the time 
was great. The kids were really down 
after placing second because they all 
thought they would win. But later they 
realized they had done their best and 
really ran well." 

The NCAA meet ended the year for 
all but two of the Demons. Campbell 
will compete in the shot put at the 
Atheltic Congress national meet June 
18-20 at Knoxville, TN and 
Scheweitzer will compete in The 
Athletic Congress national decathlon 
competition on those same dates in 
Baton Rouge. 



Thomas, Frey Attend 
Nat l Finals Rodeo 



Brian Thomas of Natchitoches and 
Mark Frey of Morganza will be in 
Bozeman, Mont., June 15-19 to 
represent Northwestern State 
University in the College National 
Finals Rodeo. 

Thomas and Frey will compete in the 
team roping competition at the CNFR, 
which is sponsored by the National 
Intercollegiate Rodeo Association. 
The national finals include three long 
go-rounds and a nationally-televised 
finals. 

A junior agri-business major, 
Thomas qualified for the CNFR by 
finishing second in team roping at the 
end of the NIRA Southern Region's 
regular 12-rodeo season. He is the first 
intercollegiate rodeo contestant from 
Northwestern to qualify for the 

prestigious Finals Rodeo. This was 
NSU'S first year of team membership 
in the NIRA. 

Thomas selected Frey, an NSU 
sophomore who has been his in- 
tercollegiate and professional team 



roping partner, to compete with him at 
the CNFR. Frey was 1 1th in Southern 
Region team roping this year. 

The top two individuals in each 
event plus the top two all-arounds and 
the first two teams in the men's and 
women's division of each of the 
NIRA's io regions qualify for the 
College National Finals Rodeo. 

At the CNFR in Montana, Thomas 
will handle the heeling, and Frey will 
be roping the steers. During the 1980- 
81 season in the Southern Region, the 
Thomas-Frey team roping com- 
bination won the long go-round at 
Tyler Junior College in Tyler, Tex., 
and at the University of Southwestern 
Louisiana in Lafayette; was fourth in 
the long go-round at Navarro Junior 
College in Corsicana, Tex.; finished 
sixth in the long go-round at Southwest 
Texas University in San Marcos, Tex., 
and was eighth in the long go-round at 
Stephen F. Austin State University in 
Nacogdoches, Tex. 




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Page 8 h 



Tuesday, June 15, 1982 



Williams Terminated As A.D. Bengals 



Head Football Coach and Athletic 
Director A.L. Williams has announced 
that his contract will be terminated at 
the end of the 1982-83 fiscal year. 

Dr. Joseph J. Orze, Northwestern's 
president, stated the decision was 
made, "because it was in the best 
interests of the university to resolve the 
athletic situation at this time but still 
allow A.L. time to relocate. " 

Orze said he felt a change in NSU 
athletics, "was necessary, but I also 
wanted to be fair to Coach Williams, 
and I will provide all of the support 
possible to assist him in having a 
successful season and in leaving 
Northwestern as a winner. 

Yates Signs 
Big Man 

Northwestern State basketball 
Coach Wayne Yates capped off a 
successful recruitng year Monday 
afternoon by signing Robert Garris of 
Pine Bluff, AR to a basketball letterof 
intent. 

Garris is a 6-11 Vi, 210-pound center 
from Pine Bluff High School and is the 
seventh recruit to sign with the 
Demons. Of those seven recruits five 
will be freshmen at Northwestern in the 
Fall. 

Garris got a late start on his 
basketball career as this past season 
was his first full season. Garris did not 
play basketball until his sophomore 
year and then missed his junior year 
due to illness. 

"Robert has excellent potential and 
will fit into our program real well," 
said Demon Coach Wayne Yates. 
"We have high hopes of Robert 
developing into a strong player. He 
has great size, is a good shooter and is 
a standout in the classroom as well." 

This past season Garris helped his 
Pine Bluff team to a 13-10 overall 
record and to third place in the district 
behind Little Rock Hall High. In two 
games against all-stater Anthony 
Walton Garris held the high-scoring 
Walton to just four points. 

"For us Robertas a rebounder and 
shot blocker," said Pine Bluff Coach 
Joe Ball. "This was really his only 
season of basketball because he never 
played until the 10th grade. I really 
feel Robert is a diamond in the 
rough." 

Garris is a member of the National 
Honor Society and scored a 27 on his 
ACT exams. 

"Robert is the fifth high school 
senior we have signed and we feel this 
gives us an excellent freshman class for 
next season," said Yates, who guided 
the Demons to a 19-9 record this past 
year. "Four of these prep players were 
all-state players and with our two 
junior college recruits we feel we have 
signed some top notch basketball 
players that can help us right away." 

Others to sign with the Demons this 
year include guards Brian Jolivette and 
Robbie Brown from Holy Rosary in 
Lafayette, forward Donald Mays from 
Logansport, guard DeShon Jenkinb 
from Jena, forward Robin Grays from 
Tyler Junior College and forward A.J. 
Culbreath from Panola Junior 
College. 



Williams, whose contract will expire 
on July 1, 1983, has served as head 
coach at Northwestern for seven 
seasons, compiling a record of 32 
victories and 41 losses. He has been 
athletic director for five years and 
served one season as an assistant. 

"I feel we have made progress in 
football," Williams said. "I am 
disappointed that some of the goals we 
had set were not reached. After the 8-3 
season in 1980, we felt the football 
program had reached the point where 
we wanted it to be, but a lot of injuries 
last year set us back." 

Williams went on to say, "I feel that 
the athletic program is in overall much 
better shape now than it was when I 
came here, but I don't have any bad 
feelings. I have had too many great 
relationships with athletes here to be 
bitter." 

Williams best year came in 1980, 



when the Demons won eight games, for 
only the third time in history, and were 
ranked eighth in the final 1-AA poll. 
The 1980 season was highlighted by a 
13-10 victory over McNesse in Lake 
Charles, which snapped a two-year 
regular season winning streak for the 
Cowboys. 

While at Northwestern, Williams has 
put several players in the professional 
ranks, these include Sidney Thornton 
of the Steelers, Petey Perot of the 
Eagles, and Joe Delaney of the Chiefs. 
Four others-Mark Duper, James 
Bennett, Carlton Finister, and Darrel 
Toussaint—will join pro teams this 
season. 

From the 1981 season Northwestern 
will return 15 starters, and Williams 
said he is "optimistic that we will have 
a successful year. My objective is to 
have the best football team possible." 



In Second Round 

Dolphins Draft Duper 



Wide receiver Mark Duper of 
Northwestern State was selected in the 
second round of the National Football 
League draft by the Miami Dolphins. 

Duper was the 52nd player selected 
in the annual draft and the second 
player from Louisiana taken. LSU 
wide receiver Orlando McDaniel was 
the 50th player selected. 

Duper is the second Northwestern 
player in two years to be selected in the 
second round as last season Joe 
Delaney was selected in the second 
round and went on to earn UPI Rookie 
of the Year honors for Kansas City. 

Duper, who is a track All-American 
at Northwestern, caught 24 passes this 
past season for 592 yards and seven 
touchdowns. Duper averaged 24.7 
yards per catch and tied a school 
record with three touchdowns in a 
season-ending 41-9 win over Northeast 
Louisiana. 



"I'm happy, I'm glad to be going to 
Miami," said Duper after the selec- 
tion. "I thought I had a chance to go 
in the second round but I wasn't sure. 
Miami wasn't one of the teams that 
showed alot of interest, but I'm very 
happy to be drafted by the Dolphins." 



Tab Bennett 
In The Ninth 

James Bennett has become the 
second Northwestern State wide 
receiver to be picked in the National 
Football League draft as he was taken 
in the ninth round by the Cincinnati 
Bengals. 

Bennett, a native of Shreveport who 
prepped at Woodlawn High School, 
follows teammate Mark Duper in the 
draft. Duper was selected by Miami in 
the second round. 

Bennett led Northwestern receivers 
in receptions this past season with 28 
catches for 489 yards. Bennett scored 
three touchdowns and averaged 17.5 
yards per catch. For his career Bennett 
had 69 receptions for 1,185 yards and 
1 1 touchdowns. As a sophomore 
Bennett led the team with 10 punt 
returns for 57 yards. 

"James has worked extremely hard 
during his career and being drafted is a 
just reward," said Demon head Coach 
A.L. Williams. "James has the finest 
pair of hands of any receiver I have 
ever worked with. He is so fluid that 
sometimes you just can't believe hovf 
well he can catch a football." 




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VolLXXl 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Tuesday, July 20, 1982 



Alost Named Director 



Dr. Robert Alost, dean of the 
College of Education since 1975, has 
resigned from his position at Nor- 
thwestern to accept the position of 
director of the new Louisiana School 
for Math, Science and the Arts. 

Alost has been unamiously ap- 
pointed director by the board of 
directors for the school, who met at 
Northwestern on Friday and Saturday. 
Some 80 applicants applied for the 
directorship of the school, which is 
scheduled to open in the fall of 1983 on 
the campus. 

"I really think this will be a 
tremendous thing for the state of 
Louisiana and certainly for Nor- 
thwestern and the Natchitoches area," 
said Alost, referring to the gifted and 
talented school. Alost said that the 
school is the first of its kind in the 
nation, in that it will house both 
talented and gifted children in a 
residential setting. The newly ap- 
pointed director felt the school was one 

$125,000 Cutback 
At Northwestern 

Northwestern will see a $125,000 
cutback in Federal financial aid dollars 
in the fall and spring of this year, says 
Assistant Director of Financial Aid 
Terry Faust. "This is just a trend that 
seems like it's going to continue," said 
Faust. 

"Every school was cut a certain 
percent of what they received," said 
Faust. He added that a Federal bill has 
been proposed to put $25,000 back into 
the college work study program, but 
that nothing would be known about 
the bill until August or September. 

"The best thing we can hope for is to 
keep our funding at it's present 
levels," commented Faust. He added 
that Northwestern has had to make 
some cutbacks to accommodate the lost 
Federal aid dollars. "We are rewarding 
those students who make sastisfactory 
grades with financial .'aid,*, said the 
assistant director of financial aid. 

"Rewarding" students who make 
satisfactory grades is another way of 
saying that the requirements for 
Financial Aid at NSU are being 
tightened, and those who do not make 
the grades will find themselves out of 
financial aid monies. 

The new stan dards for receiving 
financial aid are that a student must 
have an overall 2.0 GPA in the four 
major subjects in order to be in good 
academic standing to qualify for 
financial assistance as a Freshman. To 
continue receiving, financial assistance 
a student must make satisfactory 
academic progress. This calls for a 
student to 'maintain* 1.5 GPA the first 
year in college. The second year a 
student must maintain a 2.0 GPA to 



of the most exciting things to happen at 
Northwestern and added, "It's one of 
those things that makes you want to get 
out of bed in the morning and go to 
work." 

Governor David Treen, who was at 
Northwestern to dedicate the new 
school, said the school is "an op- 
portunity to challenge every bright 
mind in our state." 

The school will bring 11th and 12th 
grade academically gifted or artistically 
talented high school students to live on 
the NSU campus, in Bossier and 
Prudhommewlormitories "Both dor- 
lmitories and the old Natchitoches High 
building, as well as the' gymnasium 
behind the school are scheduled for a 
complete renovation," said Alost. 

A member of the Northwestern 
faculty since 1963, Alost served as head 
of the Department of Health and 
Physical Education for 12 years before 
becoming dean of the College of 
Education, one of the largest colleges 

continue receiving financial asistance. 
If a student fails to maintain the 
required GPA (in order to continue 
receiving financial asistance), he or she 
will not receive financial assistance for 
the following semester. The student 
must make a 2.0 GPA and enroll in the 
same number of hours as the previous 



on campus. 

Before working at NSU, Alost 
taught for one year at Alexandria 
Junior High School and two years at 
Central High School of Baton Rouge 
and was a teacher and coach at 
Istrouma High School of Baton Rouge 
for three years. 

Alost is a graduate of Bolton High 
School of Alexandria, received 
bachelor and master's degrees from 
Northwestern and earned the doctorate 
degree in education from Louisiana 
State University. 

Former president of the Louisiana 
Association for Colleges of Teacher 
Education and the Louisiana Council 
of Deans of Education, Alost is a 
member of the Governor's Advisory 
Committee on Education of Han- 
dicapped Children and the Joint 
Legislative Committee on Teacher 
Education Programs. 

During his tenure as NSU's dean of 
education, Alost has established the 

semester in order to make satisfactory 
progress and receive financial 
assistance the following semester. 

Transfer students are required to 
comply with the above standards of 
satisfactory progress in order to receive 
financial assistance at NSU. 

A student may receive financial aid 




Center for the History of Louisiana 
Education, the North Louisiana 
Professional Development Center and 
the Distinguished Faculty Chair at 
Northwestern. 

A frequent speaker for educaton 
meetings throughout the South, Alost 
has published articles in numerous 
professional journals, including 
"Louisiana Schools," "LAHPER 
Journal," "The Boardman," and 
"Louisiana Education Research 
Association Journal." 

Active in civic activities in the 
Natchitoches area, Alost is a former 
president of the Natchitoches Parish 
Chamber of Commerce and the 
Natchitoches Lions Club. He has 
served on the board of directors of the 
Natchitoches Recreation Association 
and is on the Board of Deacons of the 
First Baptist Church. 

No replacement has yet been named as 
dean of the College of Education," 
said Alost. 

for a maximaum of five years (ten 
semesters) in order to complete a four 
year degree program. 

Faust felt the tougher standards for 
aid will remain as long as Republicans 
are in office. He added, "Students are 
going to have to make good grades to 
get funding," 



if 




Plllil km 




Newly Remodeled Front Gate 



Page 2 



Edit orials and (Commentary 



July 20, 1982 



Radical Rag 



Retention Is The Word 



"NSU is the place for you" is being 
backed by Mayor Joe Sampite and 
Natchitoches friends of Northwestern 
again this fall. The administration and 
faculty at NSU are pleased that the city 
supports us so whole-heartedly. 

Unfortunately the general feeling 
among the campus is that the body race 
is on. The "beef up the enrollment" 
policy comes across as propaganda 
that leaves the students who enroll 
semester after semester out in the cold. 

Consider for a moment the 
scholarship situation. Through no 
fault of the admissions office, there are 
no graduate student scholarships 
available, and very few scholarships 
are ear-marked for upper class 
students. It is these students who come 
back semester after semester to pay 
their money to NSU. 



It is these 

students who have proved that they are 
indeed serious about being in college. 
But instead of incouraging these 
students to continue in their studies, the 
system leans toward an incoming 
freshman who has never paid fees to 
NSU, and may not even be in college 
over one or two semesters. 

Anotner point to ponder are the 
campus dormitories. The problems of 
emptydormitories is a large one, even 
the governor has addressed. But out of 
all the dormitories, the ones 
designated as freshmen dorms are the 
newest and most modern ones on 
campus. An upperclassman who 
wishes to have upper class privileges 
must brave the scalding showers, leaky 
roofs, pitiful heating systems, and 
generally run down and out-dated 



conditions in the dorms designated 
"upperclass". Is it any wonder the 
upperclassmen don't want to live on 
campus? 

Inside View, designed exclusively for 
freshman, not only allows the new 
faces to get a sneak preview of NSU, 
but also allows them to pre-register. 
For two years now the students have 
asked for pre-registration, the Student 
Government Association has passed 
bills calling for pre-registration, but 
still the students cannot pre-register. 

Incoming freshman are given a 
privilege previously given only to 
seniors, a right not given to 
sophomores, juniors, and graduate 
students . 



The bulk of the problem of 
enrollment at NSU is not with ob- 
taining freshmen, it is with retaining 
the students who return semester after 
semester. 

Instead of catering to one 
shot students, the state Board of 
Regents, the city of Natchitoches, and 
most importantly, the Northwestern 
administration must move with the 
times and support the people who 
continue to support NSU. 



This does not mean that we should 
not be concerned with recruiting new 
students. It simply means that keeping 
the students after they are recruited is 
only common sense. 



J^etters fo T he E ditor 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 

Editor 
Sonja Henry 
Managing Editor 
Bonnie Lawson 
Business Manager 
Cay Kelly 
Sports Editors 
Tammy Curry 
Roger Reynolds 
Photographer 
Melody Busby 
^Columnist 
Joe Cunningham 

Advertising Manager 
Melinda Moore 

Advisor 
Franklin Pressor) 



Current Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224, Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357-5456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 
Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce, 
NSU, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor arc invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce, NSU, Natchitoches. Louisiana, 71457. 



Dear Editor, 

It's time to give the city a break over 
the Chaplain's Lake affair. If Mayor 
Sampite had the money I am sure the 
lake would be cleaned. 

A major part of the problem is the 
legal right to who owns and can use the 
lake. The city has a contract or 
something that permitted them to 
deposit their sludge. But what of the 
homeowners that dump their raw 
sewage into the lake. During a recent 
drive along the lake I counted at least 
10 sewage drain lines emptying into the 
lake. One home is owned by a NSU 
professor. So while the mayor is 
working on getting funds to clean the 



s 



lake, the students should work to stop 
the other sources of pollution. 

By the way, in regard to the use of 
the lake, it seems that local towns 
people can fish on the lake but students 
can't picnic there as a result of an order 
by President Orze . 

During a recent drive along the lake I 
counnted at least 10 sewage drain lines 
emptying into the lake. One home is 
owned by a NSU professor. So while 
the mayor is working on getting funds 
to clean the lake, the students should 
work to stop the other sources of 
pollution. Gary Oglesby 

Box 3603 NSU 
Natchitoches, La. 71457 



tuff 



Dear Editor, 

I just wanted to write and express my 
opinion on last years POTPOURRI. I 
feel that this was the best book that 
Northwestern has had in a long time. 
It seemed to be very well planned and 
layed out. 

Over the past years, the quality of 
the POTPOURRI has not been up to 
par. Every year they have had an 
overwhelming budget, but the quality 
of the book was lacking. This year 
they were on a very tight budget, and 
suprisingly enough, they produced a 
quality book. 

I just wanted to compliment 
the editor and his staff on a job well 
done. I only hope the quality of next 
years POTPOURRI will equal the 
quality and workmanship of the 1982 
POTPOURRI. 

Thank you, 
J.D. Williams 



By Joe Cunningham 



Winding Down The Summer 



...A few pot shots as the slow 
summer session winds down to a 
finish, and my grade point winds down 
to where I'll be finished. 

...It's official, Governor Dave Treen 
has officially signed Natchitoches and 
Northwestern up for the new Gifted 
and Talented High School. This will 
sure be a tremendous boost for 
everyone here in Natchitoches, in- 
cluding NSU. Enough just can't be 
said about our local legislators down in 
Baton Rouge, Senator Don Kelly and 
Representative Jimmy Long who 
worked tirelessly on the issue. 

...How about that Folk Festival. It is 
just amazing how Dr. Don Hatley and 
Jim Johnson have built that thing up to 
what it is today. If you've been by 
either man's office in the last couple of 



weeks, it would be hard to get in to see 
them without tripping over envelopes, 
folders, letters, or some other Folk 
Festival paraphanelia. They've done 
for this festival what legislators Long 
and Kelly have done for the G 8 T 
School. And did you notice how many 
people were there and all of the dif- 
ferent crafts. Personally, I liked the 
duck carvings. Some of those were so 
real looking you half way expected 
them to reach their necks up and quack 
once or twice. 

...And while we're on the subject of 
people doing outstanding things for 
NSU, how about a plug for all you 
sports fans out there. NSU basketball 
star Wayne Waggoner was recently 
selected in the 6th round of the NBA 
draft. The NBA's Dallas Mavericks 



selected the 6-3 sharpshooter from 
Shreveport who was the Demons 
leading scorer and All-Conference the 
past two years 

Over on the astro-turf, three NSU 
football players have been selected pre- 
season All-America's in the SPOR- 
TING NEWS pre-season Division 1- 
AA Football Checklist. Reasons was 
named to the Kodak first team All- 
America squad last and Hebert was an 
honorable mention selection two years 
ago. Oatis set a school record for 
receiving yards last year. 

...Well, that's about it, hope you're 
summer was (is) as good as mine. Hope 
to see you all back in the fall, same 
time, (Tuesday afternoon) same place 
(your friendly neighborhood SAUCE 
box), same station (NSU). Have a good 
summer, and try not fail those finals. 



July 20, 1982 



Wester Lists Scholarships Available 



Page 3 



If you are an upperclassman or a 
transfer student and you want to apply 
for a scholarship, your chances of 
receiving one are slim, reports Director 
of Admissions Curtis Wester. . 

"There are not many scholarships 
for a continuing or transfer student," 
said Wester . Wester said a junior 
with a four point grade average who 
had never applied for a scholarship 
before would have more trouble than 
an incoming freshman who applied for 
a scholarship. 

"Most of the scholarships we deal 
with are for incoming freshmen. 
Unfortunately there are not very many, 
if any scholarships for out of state 
students," said Wester. Wester said 
that scholarships are used as a 
recruiting tool, with the idea that NSU 
can attract good students and 
hopefully those students will keep their 
scholarships for a few years. 

Wester said upperclassmen do have a 
chance to pick up a scholarship if a 
recipient with a four-year donation 
loses theirs for any reason. 

The office of Admisssons has 
recently developed a form that students 
ca fill out to apply for all scholarships, 
according to Wester . He added that in 
the past, students have had to apply for 
a specific scholarship, and there was no 
central list available. 

If you want to apply for a 
scholarship, Wester advises you take 
these steps: 

- Go to the Registrar's office and 
obtain a student copy of your tran- 
scripts. 

- Pick up an application and 
scholarship list from the office of 
Admissions. 

- Find a scholarship that relates to 
you, or that you are qualified for. 

- Fill out the application and turn it 
in to the Admissions office, with a 
copy of your transcripts. 

- Go to the college or department 
that is donating the scholarship, and 
advise them that you are applying for a 
scholarship. (The Admissions office 
will have this information, if you are 
not sure who the donor is). 



Below is a list of scholarships 
available to students, as compiled by 
the office of admissions. The list is 90 
to 95 percent complete, reports 
Wester . The deadline for applying for 
all scholarships has been set at March 
15 by the office of Admissions. The 
number, amount and requirements for 
each scholarship are given, if the donor 
supplied it to the office of admissions. 
If you are interested in a scholarship 
that has incomplete information, check 
with the admissions office for who to 
contact for the complete information. 

NSU Academic Scholarship; $1250 yr.; 
20 available; quaifications are B grade 
average, top 25 percent of class. 
Freshman Nursing Scholarship; $500 
yr.; 30 available* freshman nursing 
major, based on ACT and high school 
grades. 

Presidential Scholar Service Award; 
$600 yr. 40 available; ACT composite 
of 20 or more. 

NSU Cheerleader Scholarship; $600 
yr.; 10 available; talent' and abilities 
(try-outs), interview; length of 
scholarship one year. 
Presidents Leadership Program; $600 
yr.; 20 available; leadership ability, 
(freshman only); one year with op- 
portunity to convert to 30-hour student 
job. 

Cane River Belle Scholarship; $150 yr.; 
number not given; try-outs and per- 
sonal interviews; length not given. 
Sara Clapp Scholarship; $200 yr.; one 
available; Junior standing in 
Education; length one year. 
Leroy S. Miller Scholarship; $200-1200 
yr.; one to four available; length one 
year. 

Watson Award for Excellence in 
Music; amount varies; one available; 
Junior Music major, 3.0 GPA; length 
one year. 

H.D. Dear Piano Award; amount 
varies; no number given; contact music 
department. 

Wildlife Management Scholarship; 
$600 yr.; two available; Senior 
Wildlife, Zoology, Botany major; 
length one year or two semesters. 
Band, Choral, Orchestra; amount 



varies; audition, maintain 2. GPA 
NSU Alumni Scholarship; $400 yr.; 
four available; GPA, ACT, need; 
length fours years or graduation. 
City Bank Scholarship; $300 yr.; one 
available; Freshman business major, 
Natchitoches Parish graduate; length 
freshman year. 

Exchange Bank Scholarship; $300 yr.; 
one available; Freshman business 
major, Natchitoches Parish graduate; 
length freshman year. 

Newitt Memorial Scholarsip; $500 
yr.; number not given; Orleans Parish 
resident, upper 10 percent of class. 
Robert Easley Memorial; $300 yr; one 
available; Freshman in business, ACT, 
GPA, need; length freshman year only. 
A. A. Fredericks Memorial; $300 yr.; 
one avalable; major in agriculture, 
recommended by high school principal 
or agriculture teacher; length eight 
semesters 

Corinne Saucier Scolarship; $500 yr.; 
five available, resident of Avoyelles 
Parish, need; length four years or 
graduation. 

Robert Easley Memorial; $300 yr f ; one 
available; Freshman in business, ACT, 
GPA, need; length Freshman year 
only. 

A. A. Fredericks Memorial; $300 yr,; 
one available; major in agriculture, 
recommended by high school principal 
or agriculture teacher; length eight 
semesters. 

Corinne Saucier Scholarship; $500 yr.; 
five available; resient of Avoyelles 
Paris C need; length four years or 
graduation. 

Eugene P. Watson Memorial; $400 yr.; 
one available; Junior Library major, 3. 
GPA; length one year. 
NSU Entertainers Scholarship; $1000; 
talent try-out, maintain 2. overall 
GPA; length not given. 
Jewell P. Jackson Scholarship; $500 
yr., one available, need, good 
academically; length eight semesters. 
Freshman Rotary Scholarship; $300; 
Freshman, ACT, GPA, need; no 
length given. 

Alpha Mu Gamma Scholarship; 
amount varies; major or minor in 
foreign language, 3.5 GPA. 



Anna Hester Morton Scholarship; 
$400 yr.; one available; based on need, 
GPA; length one year. 
Live Oak Arabian Horse Scholarship; 
amount varies; one available; Equine 
science major, prefer out-of-state; 
length one year. 

Walter H. Couvillion Scholarship; 
$200 yr.; one available; Library 
Science major, ACT, need; length 
freshman year only. 
Annie Laurie Pujos Scholarship; $1000 
yr.; one available; Education major, 
need, primarily from Thibodeaux High 
School; length eight semesters. 
JoAnne Gail Marx Scholarship; $400 
yr.; one available; Upperclassman, 
need, 2.5 GPA; length one year or as 
needed. 

Tri-Sigma Scholarship; $100 yr.; one 
available; contact Shreveport 
Alumnae Chapter; one semester only. 
American Legion Post Number 10; 
amount varies; awarded to parish 
outstanding 4-H winner; length 
freshman year only. 
Esther Cooley Memorial Scholarship; 
$200 yr.; no number given; Home 
Economics major, GPA, ACT; no 
length given. 

R.O.T.C. Scholarship; amount varies; 

contact R.O.T.C. department. 

High School Honor Scholarships; $50 

yr.; no number given; nominated by 

high school principal. 

T.H. Harris Scholarship; amount 

varies; apply directly to T.H. Harris 

Foundation. 

NSU Rodeo Club Scholarship; amount 
varies; ability, GPA, personal in- 
terview; no length given. 
Gertrude Bott Saucier Scholarship; 
$800 yr.; established need analysis, 
high school transcript; no length given. 
Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge 
Scholarship; $1000 yr., major in 
Forestry, Wildlife, Zoology, 2.5 GPA. 
Nursing Scholarships; amount varies; 
contact admissions or College of 
Nursing. 

Out of State Fee Waiver Scholarship; 
$630 yr.; as many students as qualify, 3. 
GPA, upper 10 percent, 23 ACT, 
active in extra activities, must be 
approved by State Board of Trustees. 



Gold Nugget 

The Gold Room of Games 

Tuesday Night 

_____ I 

Special Offer: j 

2 free tokens : 
with this .coupon. J 



Ca$h For 
Your Book$ 

3 Day$ Only 

July 26, 27 & 28 at 

Univer$ity Bookstore 

9-4:30 Daily 



Page 4 



c 



B 



July 20, 1982 



ampusOriefs 



rZtZe™" LODA Opens 1982 Season 



Available 



The San Angelo Extravaganza, a 
weekend trip to the Northwestern State 
vs. Angelo State football game on 
September 11, is now open for 
reservations at the Northwestern State 
athletic department. 

There are two separate packages 
available for the trip, which is being 
sponsored by the NSU athletic 
department. 

Package No. 1 includes round trip 
air transportation, an arrival cocktail 
party, Friday evening buffet, the pre- 
game meal and pre-game meeting with 
the Demon team on Saturday, a ticket 
to the football game, the post-game 
meal and all taxes, tips and graduities. 

The price for Pack No. 1 is $230. per 
person for double occupancy and $250 
for single occupancy. The team and 
travel party will leave Friday, Sep- 
tember 10, will return Saturday night 
after the game and will stay at the 
Holiday Inn Holidome while in San 
Angelo. 

Package No. 2 is similar to the first 
package but does not include air 
transportation. The cost of the second 
package is $70. per person for double 
occupancy and $90. for single oc- 
cupancy. 

Persons interested in either of the 
two packages should contact Gordon 
Anderson al the NSU Fieldhouse for 
reservations or for additional in- 
formation. The telephone number 
l here is 318-357-5251. 

Because of limited space on the 
airplane a $100 deposit per person is 
requested as soon as possible. Those 
wishing to sign up for Package No. 2 
should include a $50 deposit per 
person. Reservations will be accepted 
on a firsi-comc, first-serve basis. 



NATCHITOCHES-The Louisiana 
Outdoor Drama Association will 
present "South Pacific," the first of 
two productions for the 1982 summer 
season, beginning Friday night at the 
Grand Ecore Amphitheatre. 

"South Pacific" will run five nights, 
July 16-17, and July 22-24. The second 
show of the season, "Li'l Abner," will 
begin a three-weekend run of July 30. 
All shows are scheduled for 8:30 p.m., 
and tickets are $4.50 for adults and 
$2.50 for children. 

Since its opening some 25 years ago, 
"South Pacific" has become a classic 
wartime romance. It is set in the South 
Pacific during World War II. 

"South Pacific," with the book by 
Josh Logan and music by Rodgers and 
Hammerstein, features such 
memorable showtunes as >"Some 
Enchanted Evening," "Bali Hai," 
"Bloody Mary," "There is Nothing 
Like a Dame," "I'm Gonna Wash 
That Man Right Outa My Hair" and 
"Younger than Springtime." 

A number of faculty members and 
students in Northwestern State 
University's School for the Creative 
and Performing Arts will be involved 
in the LODA productions as cast 
members and members of the 
production staff. 

Heading the cast for "South 
Pacific" are Jim Ford as Emile 
DeBeque, Debra Gray as Nellie 
Forbush, Lillian Taylor as Bloody 
Mary, Harold Ashcraft as Lt. Joe 
Cable and Ken Woodard as Luther 
Billis. 

Others featured in the cast include 
Paul Powell as Captain Brackett, Fred 
Carmichael as Commander Harbison, 



Xuan Rutter as Liat, Brooke Smith as 
Gnana and Seth Taylor as Jerome. 

Woody Hay will appear as Henri 
and the professor, Lauri Fisher and 
Heather Price play Bloody Mary's 
assistants, Jack Caputo has the role of door. 
Abner, and Chip Bailey will appear as 
Stewpot. 

Also featured in the cast will be 
Dennis Wilson as Quale, Ken Richards 
as O'Brien, Bob Burkhead as Mc- 
Caffrey, Howard Burkett as Steeves 
and Eddie Norris, Bob Allen and Bruce 
Young as other sailors. 



strip of the same name, are available at 
the Roque House on the riverbank in 
Natchitoches and at the Chamber of 
Commerce office on Front Street. 
Tickets will also be available at the 



Renovations 
To Begin 
On Natatorium 



Nurses for the show include Vanessa 
McGaskey, Brenda Goleman, Martha 
Taylor, Evie Posey, Susan Monday, 
Vicki Lewis, Sandy Parker, Mar'Sue 
Wilson, Sandy Mitchell, Pat Waddel 
and Cindy Watson. 

Walt Taylor and Conna Goutier are 
producers for the show, which is being 
directed by James Wilson. Sally 
Carmichael is the assistant director. 

Shelia Martin is the music director, 
and Barbara Hernandez is 
choreographer. Rick Mason designed 
the stage and scenery, and Steve 
Fletcher is sound director. Costumes 
were designed by Ester Pfifenroth. 

Based on the James Michener book. 
"Tales of the South Pacific," the 
widely-acclaimed film version of the 
show featured Rossano Brazzi as Emile 
and Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie. The story 
centers around the love affair between 
Emile and Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie. The 
story centers around the love affair 
between Emile and Nellie. 

Tickets for "South Pacific" and 
"Li'l Abner," a zany musical comedy 
based on the famous Al Capp comic 



Library To Sponsor Microcomputer Workshop 



Noriliwestern State University's 
Eugene P. Watson Memorial Library 
and the Louisiana Association of 
School Librarians will sponsor a 
workshop on microcomputers in 
education Tuesday, July 27, at NSU. 

Sid Agent of the Tandy Corporation 
in Dallas and Shirley McCandless, 
administrative officer of instructional 
computers for the State Department of 
Education, will be the consultants for 
the workshop. 

Scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 
in Room 240 of the NSU Student 
Union Building, the workshop is being 
coordinated by Watson Library Director 



Rebecca Lawrence, head of the 
university library's media division. 

Buchanan said the one-day 
workshop at Northwestern has been 
approved for four Professional Im- 
provement Program credits. 

The microcomputer workshop is 
designed to provide "hands-on" 
experience. Other areas of 
microcomputer interest to be included 
in the program are the status in 
Louisiana, utilization and selection of 
microcomputers. 

For additional information, call 318- 
357-4403 or write Dr. William 



Watson Memorial Library, Nor- 
thwestern State University, Nat- 
chitoches, La. 71457. 



1 

"\ 
I 

7 
T 



Mclnnis Brothers, Inc., of Minden 
has been awarded a $689,081 contract 
to completely renovate Nesom 
Natatorium, the indoor swimming and 
diving facility at Northwestern State 
University. 

Loran Lindsey, director of the 
physical plant at NSU, said renovation 
work began this week and is scheduled 
to be completed by March of 1983. 
This is the first major renovation to the 
natatorium since it was constructed in 
1938. 

The project will include making the 
swimming pool more accessible to 
handicapped persons, installing new 
pool service equipment and renovating 
the existing building. 

Lindsey said the natatorium's glass 
roof will be replaced, new lighting will 
be installed, and the pool and decking 
will be refinished with new ceramic tile 
and outdoor carpeting. 

Walls and ceilings in the pool area, 
which is 121 feet by 52 feet, will be 
refinished with ceramic tile, and new 
aluminum steps will be added to the 
pool. 

The basement of the 14,326-square- 
foot building will be renovated as an 
equipment and storage area, and new 
heating, air-conditioning and ven- 
tilation systems and Operable win- 
dows will be installed in the building. 

Two student dressing rooms and two 
faculty dressing areas will be com- 
pletely renovated along with three 
faculty offices in the natatorium. 



Dr. William C. Buchanan and Dr. Buchanan, Director, Eugene R. 

Potpourri Positions Open 



Two scholarship positions are open 
for qualified students interested in 
being part of the team preparing the 
1983 POTPOURRI, student yearbook. 

Ed Dupuis, editor, said recently that 
he is looking for a sports editor and a 
photographer. 

"We need to fill both positions 
within the next week if we can find the 
right persons," Dupuis said. 



He said interested students should 
call him at 357-5026 or the faculty 
adviser, Ezra Adams, at 357-4586 
immediately. Both Dupuis and Adams 
can be reached by writing to them at 
NSU Box 5245, Natchitoches. 



Each position carries a scholarship 
for the student chosen, Dupuis said. \ 



The 
Sub Machine 

582 Front Street 

Orders to Go 352-91 34 

Now Open 



Sandwiches 



Ice Cream 



Mon.-Fri. 11-9 
Sat. 11-7 
Sun. 12-6 



July 20, 1982 

Supplement 



Designed Especially For High School Students 



[)emon ^^onnection 



NSU Hosts Miss Drill Team Camp 







Dance Camp Instructors 



...step hop, step kick, turn 2, 3, 
snap... Can you quess what this is 
If you guessed girls learning a dance 
routine, you're absolutely correct. 

Ten high schools and junior high 
schools from throughout Louisiana, 
Arkansas, arid Texas attended the 
Northwestern Miss Drill Team 
World dance camp held July 11-15. 
Many routines, techniques, and 
drills Were learned during this five 
day session. 

Instructors of the camp were 
Jamie Wilkins of Peoria, Illinois; 
and Pam McElroy of Houston, 
Texas. 

Miss Wilkins attends Indiana 
University where she is a senior 
majoring in Marketing Management 
with a emphasis in Computer 
Technology. Jamie, the former 
Miss Drill Team World Illinois 

1979, is a member of the "Red 
Steppers". 

Miss McElroy attends the 
University of Houston. She is 
pursuing a major in Dance and 
Physical Education. Pam is the 
former Miss Drill ;Team USA of 

1980. She judges and teaches in- 
ternationlly as well as helps direct 
the Miss Drill Team USA Pageant 

Jamie and Pam have directed 
camps all over the United States. 
NSU instructors were: Dwanda 



Smith, Houma; Vaneesa 
McGaskey, Provencal; Brenda 
Goleman, Natchitoches; Stacey 
Baumgardner, Natchitoches, 
Monique Esquireux, New Iberia. 

On Sunday the squads gathered in 
Keyser Auditorium for their first 
session. They were given a schedule 
of the weeks activities and learned 
routines. Afterwards, cookies and 
punch were served. 

During the week, the squads 
watched a film on "Miss Drill Team 
USA". A pizza party was held after 
the film. 

Each school received a trophy. 
Oak Forest High School received 
the Teachers Award. This award 
went to the squad who showed the 
most enthusiasm, spirit, and per- 
formance. Some of the girls 
received ribbons for individual 
achievement. 

The highlight of the camp was the 
crowning of "Top of the World" 
girl. The winner was Dede Duncan, 
a 16-year-old senior from E.D. 
White High School. Dede is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry 
Duncan. "This was a great ex- 
perience for me," said Dede. "I've 
enjoyed the camp very much and 
had lots of fun," she continued. 

(Continued on Page 4 ) 



For Summer Orientation 



Inside View Welcomes Freshmen 



Every student who attended Inside 
View truly got a taste of college life. 
Inside View was the summer orien- 
tation program designed for incoming 
freshmen. It was sponsored by High 
School Relations. 

Ten college students, called Insiders 
were selected to be counselors. Their 
job was to make every freshman feel 
relaxed and welcome at NSU. 

From the moment of registration 
until the end of the farewell ceremony, 
each student was exposed to many 
different aspects of college life. 

The entire program began with the 
opening ceremony conducted by the 
ten Insiders. They set a very com- 
fortable atmosphere by dancing, and 
singing songs about NSU. After their 
presentation, Dr. Joseph Orze, 
President of NSU, welcomed the 
students to Northwestern. "Your class 
will be very special to me. We both 
will be starting off at the same time, 
and I'm looking forward to many great 
years here at NSU . " 

The students were then divided into 
ten separate groups, with an Insider 
leading each. During their stay, each 
freshman was required to take the 
English placement test. This test 
helped their advisers in preparing the 
students' schedules. 



A Parents' Program was provided 
for those parents wishing to attend. 
This was indeed a fine program where 
many parents learned a lot about 
Northwestern. They (parents) had a 
panel of people to answer any 
questions that they had concerning 
NSU. 

On the second day, the Insiders 
presented skits to inform the students 
of the various programs and services 
offered to them. The United Ministries 
of Higher Education provided cokes 
during a short break in the students' 
busy schedule. 

The Organizational Potpourri also 
took place on the second day. Its main 
purpose was to expose the freshmen to 
the many organizations at Nor- 
thwestern. Tables were decorated and 
set up around the Student Union 
Ballroom. Students were able to go 
from table to table and see what each 
organization offered. Many clubs had 
applications available, making this a 
great opportunity to get the freshmen 
involved. 

The highlight of Inside View was the 
Cabaret. At eight o'clock on the 
second night, students entered the 
candlelit nightclub-type atmosphere of 
s the ballroom. Excellent entertainment 
was provided by several NSU students. 



is 



'•s~» ♦»>:> 




Inside View Staffers 



Following the entertainment and 
singalong the lights were lowered and 
the dance began. 

On the final morning, students werw 
required to eat breakfast with their 
advisers. This"gave them a chance to 
get to know their advisers better. 



The main advantage of Inside View 
was, of course, early registration. On 
the third day, each student pre- 
registered for the fall semester. 

In only two and a half days, these 
freshmen met new people, experienced 
dorm life, made new friends, and 
basically got a positive overall view of 
NSU. 



Pacje2 



Degree in Photography 
Approved by Board of Trustees 



Photography at NSU has recently 
received two major boosts through the 
renovation of the Photo Lab and the 
Board of Trustees; approval for a 
bachelors degree in photography. 

According to Nolan Bailey, In- 
structor of Photography, the 
curriculum is set up to train students in 
the methods and techniques of 
professional photography. Courses to 
be offered will involve instruction in 
such areas as black and white, portrait, 
film making, color, photojuournalism, 
and color slide. 

To accommodate the expected in- 
crease in student use of the laboratory 
facilities, the Photo Lab's large 
printing room has been divided into a 
printing darkroom and a print 
washing/drying room. Bailey said this 
would allow a larger number of 



students to use the laboratory at the 
same time. Each student will also have 
more time individually, thus preparing 
their photos and slides more ef- 
ficeintly. 

Included in the Photo Lab 
renovation was the purchase of over 
$20,000 of photographic equipment 
for use in the basic classes. Students 
working in the lab will have access to 
six new enlargers, a print washer and 
dryer, a water chiller for processing 
film, seven Olympus cameras and 
lenses, eight Vivitar flash units, and 
four Yashica Mat cameras. 

Bailey said plans are being made to 
add portrait and commercial studios, 
as well as processing areas for color 
and black-and-white film. He expects 
the program to attract many interested 
students from throughout the state. 



Inside Viewers Participate 
in Intramural Half-Niter 



With names like Crown Royal, 
Budweiser, the Hell Raisers, and the 
Jama Holies, there has got to be a fun 
time. That is just what the new in- 
coming freshmen, participating in the 
Inside View program had Sunday 
night. 

The Intramural Department hosted 
the Inside Viewers with a Half-Niter. 
The Inside View teams participated in 



10 activities during the evening with the 
finale being scooter races. The 10 
teams competed against each other in 
such games as darts, football pass, 
horseshoes, frisbee throw, and home 
run derby. 

If the enthusiasm the freshmen 
showed that night is anything like what 
it will be in the fall, student par- 
ticipation should be on the rise. 





Beauty on NSU's Campus 

Award Winners Named 
During Basketball Camp 



Intramural Dance Contest 
is an All Night Affair 



Linda Grayson of Campti and 
Shantell Hardison of Natchitoches 
were the only double award winners at 
the Northwestern State University 
annual Lady Demon summer 
basketball camp. 

Grayson, a top player at Campti 
High, won the One-on-One champ- 
tionship in the NBA Division and 
teamed with Renee Hawthorne of 
Buckeye and Shannon McKinney of 
Harrihan to claim the Three-on-Three 
title. The NBA Division consisted of 
players to be in grades 11 and 12 while 
the ABA Divison consisted of players 
in grades seven through 10. 

Hardison, of Natchitoches Junior 
High, won the ABA One-on-One title 
and then joined Rachel Henry of Basile 
and Marilyn Paul of Buckeye to win 
the Three-on-Three competition. 
Hardison topped the week to being 
named as the Offensive Player of the 
Week in the ABA Division. 

Other awards in the ABA went to 
Laura Alford of Negreet for Defensive 
Player of the Week, Kim Kelly of 
Sulphur for the Hustle Award and 
Lanie Nolen of Hicks was honored as 
the ABA Most Valuable Player. 

In the NBA awards Kristy Harris of 
Natchitoches-Central High and Sherry 
McDonald of Pitkin were co-winners 
of the Offensive Player of the Week 
award. The Defensive Player of the 
Week was also a co-winner as Becky 
Jones of Rison, AR and Chrissa Hailey 
of Jena tied for the award. 

The Hustle Award in the NBA went 
to Julie Dimmitt of Sulphur and Annie 
Harris of Campti was named as the 
NBA Most Valuable Player. Dana 



Nolen of Hicks claimed the award for 
Best All-Around camper. 

The camp was attended by over 100 
basketball players and was run by NSU 
Lady Demon Coach Pat Pierson and 
assistant Coach James Smith. 






NSU Intramurals 
is popular 
Year Around. 




IS NSU THE PLACE FOR YOU? 

ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS FIRST! 



Q lieia (Ski & ralerniiy 

&la (Qmicron (Chapter 

On Campus On Greek Hill 
357-9250 



* FACTS ABOUT FRATERNITIES* 

Overall grade point average (GPA) for 
fraternity men is higher than for 
nonfraternity men. 

*65% of all fraternity men graduate 
from college, whereas only 33% of 
men not in fraternities graduate. 



DO YOU want a quality education without having to promise to give up your first 
born child in order to pay for it? 

DO YOU want to go to a school where classes are small and personal and you 
can actually visit with the professor when you want to? 

DO YOU want to go to a school where you are a name and not a number and 
where university correspondence is not addressed to an SS No.? 
DO YOU like trees and flowers more than concrete parking lots where the thrill 
of victory is finding a parking place?... And you are more often faced with the 
agony of defeat and a parking ticket? 

DO YOU want to go to a school with a fine athletic tradition (8-3 football season 
in 1 980 and an NCAA championship track team)? 

DO YOU want a front row seat for the greatest Christmas Spectauclar in the 
country? 

ARE extra curricular activities important to you? Do you want the opportunity to 

become involved in student activities, fraternities and intramurals? 

DO YOU want access to the finest student recreation complex at any university 

in the state of Louisiana (golf, tennis, swimming)? 

ARE YOU I looking for friendships that will last a lifetime? 

THETA CHI FRATERNITY believes that if you answered these questions 

"YES," then you belong here at NSU and that you belong in a fraternity. 

THETA CHI is one fraternity that will assure that you take full advantage of the 

opportunities at NSU. So come to NSU this fall and come to the THETA CHI 

HOUSE as well. 



'FRATERNITIES AT NORTHWESTERN* 

Each fraternity is different since each is based on different precepts 
and principles. Generally, however, a fraternity is a group of men 
joined together as brothers, working as a group, socially, 
academically, athletically, and as friends. Northwestern presently 
the home of several national fraternities, each with its own individual 
characteristics. 

Perhaps the greatest thing about the Northwestern campus is its 
size. Here you are an individual, not just a student number. In 
THETA CHI that individuality is enhanced as you become an integral 
part of a working (and playing) group. Although we are all brothers 
united in ideals and friendship, we are also individuals. This ex- 
perience is invaluable during and after your college days. 
Since its founding on April 1 0, 1 856, THETA CHI has grown until it 
has more than 155 chapters throughout the United States and 
Canada. Presently there are over 1 00,000 living THETA CHIS and 
our numbers increase by over 2,500 each year. Nationally THETA 
CHI is one of the most respected fraternities and has continually 
ranked in the top five. 

Fraternities seek new members in a college ritual called "rush." At 
Northwestern rush week lasts from Sunday, August 22, through 
Monday, August 30. During that time you will have the opportunity 
to visit all the fraternity houses at NSU and learn about each 
fraternity. THETA CHI encourages you to make the best of this time, 
for this is when you meet the brothers of each fraternity and they 
meet you. On Sunday, August 29, each fraternity will meet and 
decide to whom they wish to extend "bids." A bid is an invitation to 
become a pledge. We at THETA CHI believe that your decision to 
accept the bid of a fraternity should be based on a rational and 
careful comparision of each fraternity at NSU. We are proud of the 
fraternity system here and feel that each of the fraternities has many 
positive attributes, but we are also proud of our own fraternity. Look 
at the others and then look at THETA CHi. You be the judge. 
The decision you make that week will affect your life for the next four 
years and beyond. Your college years will be among your most 
treasured memories. We believe that you will want THETA CHI 
among them. 



THETA CHI 
RUSH SCHEDULE 

August 22-28 
SUNDAY 

Open House, Noon to 6:00. 

MONDAY 

Bus Tour of Fraternity Houses; 
Meet in Lobby of Rapides Dorm. 

TUESDAY 

South Sea Island Pig Roast at 
Theta Chi House, 6:30 to 
11:00. 

WEDNESDAY 

Howdy Dance at the Union. 

THURSDAY 

Dinner and Movies at the Theta 
Chi House, 6:30 to 1 1 :00. 

FRIDAY 

50's Party at the Theta Chi 
House, 7:00 to 1 1 :30. 

SATURDAY 

Swim Party at White Sands; 
Meet at Theta Chi House by 
1:00. 

SUNDAY 

R&R and BBQ at the Theta Chi 
House, Noon to 6:00. 



Page 4 

Greeks Help 'Liven-up' NSU College Life 




Greeks Enjoy Theme Party 



College is hard tedious work that can 
sometimes drag you down and make 
you wonder why you came to school. 
Sometimes you ask yourself why you 
just didn't fail your Senior year so you 
could stick around the "easy" stuff. 
Well, there is good news for you. NSU 
can give you the opportunity to party 
and mingle as much as you want by 
joining a Greek fraternity or sorority. 

There are live fraternities and four 
sororities at NSU that will give you the 
chance to meet as many people as you 
\ want and be as active as you want. The 
Greek chapters focus on individual 
educational achievement, spirtual and 
social development as well as a lot of 
fun and friendships that w.'l last a 
lifetime. 

Every fall at NSU the Greeks pla:< a 
special rush week so that incoming 
freshmen can learn about each 
organization and decide which group 
they would like to join. The frater- 
nities at NSU are Kappa Sigma, Kappa 
Alpha, Theta Chi, Sigma Tau Gamma 
and Tau Kappa Epsilon. The sororities 
include Delta Zeta, Phi Mu, Sigma 
Kappa and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

August 22-28 is considered Rush 
Week and various parties are planned 
at the Greek Houses for all Rushees. 
During the first night of Rush the 
fraternities have open house and all 
male freshmen are invited. During the 
week the fraternities have theme 

parties such as: Jungle Party, Casino 
Party, Toga Party and Red Beans and 

Dance Camp 

(Continued from Page 1) 



The winner of the Top of the 
World award is eligible to compete 
in the Miss Drill Team USA In- 
ternational Pageant to be held in 
Los Angeles, California. 

Vicki Parrish, director of the 
camp, said, "The trend for high 
school dance lines today is to in- 
corporate jazz dance techniques into 
precision movements. Whereas, ten 
years ago, dance lines were more 
concerned with precision 
movements of the arms." Ms. 
Parrish added, "Today they create 
movements wich include leaps, 
jumps, and splits, as well as the 
traditional high kicks." 

A senior from East St. John High 
School stated, "I like the styles of 
dances we learned. I also had a lot 
of fun." 

Ms. Parrish, coordinator and 
choreographer of Cane River Belles, 
said, "As a continuation of Nor- 
thwestern's services to high school 
students involved in the 'peparts' , 
we will once again host the Miss 
Drill Team Louisiana Pageant to be 
held December 1 1 , 1982 on the NSU 
campust. The winners of this will be 
able to attend the national com- 
petition held in Los Angeles, 
California in February 1983." She 
concluded, "Dancelines are not the 
only 'peparts' to compete. There 
will be categories for cheerleaders, 
twirlers, flag corps and rifles." 

All sessions of the camp was held 
in the Dance department HPER 
building. The squads were housed 
in Rapides dormitory. 



Rice Party. 

Likewise the sororities have open 
house the first night of rush. During 



Demon 
Connection 



Staff Members 



the rest of the week the girls are invited 
back to visit the various sorority 
houses and attend theme parties. 

Both groups are governed by special 
boards which help set regulations and 
rules for Rush as well as year round 
activities. Fraternties are represented 
on the Interfraternity council and 
soroities are represented on 
Panhellenic. 

Fraternities and sororities at NSU 
are very active in civic activites and 



raise money every year for variou 
charity groups. They sponsor manj 
worthwhile service projects and help 
with various hosting duties at NSU. 

Greeks are just a part of NSU 
organization life and it is not an ab- 
solute necessity to join one to have a 
good time but they can be a valuable 
dimension to college life that will help 
you form lasting friendships and good 
times that can never be replaced. 



Sara Blackwell 
Susanne Crawford 
Tammy Curry 
Jim McKellar 
Roger Reynolds 
Dwanda Smith 

Advisor 
Franklin Presson 



This publication is 
sponsored by Nor- 
thwestern State 
University in conjunction 
with High School 
Relations and the Mass 
Communication Depar- 
tment. 




1 



Fraternities Get into the "Spirit" 
of Things During Rush Week 
August 22-28 



July 20, 1982 



Page 5 



Treen Signs Bill for Gifted and Talented School 



NATCHITOCHES--Gov. Dave 
Treen has signed the bill passed by the 
House and Senate during this year's 
legislative session officially 
establishing a school for gifted and 
talented 11th and 12th grade students 
on the Northwestern State University 
campus. 

Legislative acts named the in- 
stitution the Louisiana School of 
Math, Science and the Arts, specified 
Northwestern as the location for the 
school and provided operating funds 
and allocations for renovation of 
facilities to house the unique school. 

The legislature appropriated a first- 
year operating budget of $439,800 for 
salaries, operating expenses, 
professional services and other "start- 
up" costs for the facility, which will 
open in the fall of 1983. 

This year's capital outlay budget 
includes $2.4 million in priority one 
and another $5 million in the priority 
two category for planning and 
renovation of three buildings on the 
Northwestern campus that will be used 
for the residential school. 

Classrooms, administrating offices 
and laboratories will be established in 
the former Natchitoches Central South 
Campus classroom building, a three- 
story, 69,000-square-foot structure 
that will accomodate a student body of 
750. The old Natchitoches Central 
gymnasium will also be renovated for 
intramural and physical education 
programs. 



Bossier and Prudhomme Hall 
dormitories at Northwestern will be 
renovated to house students at the 
school, which will have an enrollment 
of some 700 by the beginning of the 
1986-87 academic year. 

The legislature also established a 23- 
member boaid to govern the Louisiana 
School of Math, Science and the Arts, 
and 18 of the board positions have 
already been filled. Board members 
will be on the Northwestern campus 
Friday and Saturday to tour facilities, 
interview applicants for director of the 
school, develop budgets and establish 
fund-raising programs. 

Under the board structure, the 
governor has eight appointments, the 
superintendent of education has two, 
and 13 are appointed on the basis of 
their positions as elected officials and 
education leaders. 

The 18 members already appointed 
to the board are Jack Pellegrin, 
president of the Board of Elementary 
and Secondary Education; Kelly Nix, 
superintendent of education; Dr. 
William Arceneaux, commissioner of 
higher education; Dr. Pat Cooper, 
assistant superintendent for special 
education; Dr. John Dupree, assistant 
superintendent for academic 
programs; Sen. Don Kelly and Rep. 
Jimmy Long of Natchitoches; Sen. 
Cecil Picard of Maurice; Rep. Jesse 
Deen of Benton; Wendell Hall of St. 




Francisville, president of the Louisiana 
School Superintendents' Association; 
Kay Coffee of New Orleans, president 
of the Louisiana Association for 
Gifted and Talented; Dr. Robert Alost, 
dean of the College of Education at 
Northwestern; Mimi Sumrall, a legal 
researcher from Covington; Barbara 
Miller, supervisor of gifted and 
talented for Jefferson Parish schools; 
Ruth Castille, director of gifted and 
talented programs for the State 
Department of Education; Mattie 
Braden, a New Orleans classroom 
teacher; internationally-renowed 
pianist Van Cliburn and Natchitoches 
businessman Ben D. Johnson. 

Rep. Long, who has worked for 
establishment of the school for the past 
two years, said the board will 
"establish policies on certification and 
tenure for faculty and will deveiop a 
system for admission of students." 

NSU Education Dean Alost, also 
active in the planning and development 
of the school, said admission will be 
based on population, with students 
selected from all 66 public school 
system in Louisiana. "If a school 
system has two percent of the state's 
population, then it is hoped that the 
system will provide two percent of the 
students for the new school,*' ne Said. 

Admission will be based on SAT test 
scores, academic records, a battery of 
special examinations and interviews to 
be conducted in Natchitoches. Testing 
will be conducted at regional centers. 

Alost said it is anticipated that some 
300 students will be interviewed in the 
process of selecting the first 200 
students for the school. He said the 
school will "seek students from every 
section of Louisiana and from every 
strata of society." 

The Northwestern dean also ex- 
plained that the original proposed 
name of the school-The Louisiana 
School for Gifted and Talented 
Students--was changed in the 
legislature "to enhance the possibilities 
of receiving funding from private and 
public sources." 

He added, "It was felt that the name 
Louisiana School of Math, Science and 
the Arts might make it easier for the 



school to obtain grants from in- 
dustries, the arts and other sources." 

Fees, tuition, room and board and 
other costs to students enrolled in the 
School of Math, Science and the Arts 
will be paid by the state. Alost s^id the 
cost of operating the school, including 
salaries, tuition for students and other 
expenses, will be some $5 million 
annually. 

The school's staff will include a 
director and deputy director, coor- 
dinators for student life, performing 
arts, Curriculum, administration and 
external affairs and some 47 teachers. 
The faculty-student ratio will be 1 to 
15. 

Harvey, Mouton 
Named Captains 

NATCHITOCHES-Harlan Harvey 
of Natchitoches has been selected as 
captain and Melinda Mouton of 
Lafayette co-captain for Northwestern 
State University's 1982-83 cheerleader 
squad. 

Harvey will be serving for the second 
consecutive year as captain of NSU's 
cheerleader squad. In the fall, he will • 
begin his third year as a Northwestern 
cheerleader. 

A native of Jonesbobo, Harvey is a 
junior public relations major. He is 
the son of Julia K. Beal of Nat- 
chitoches and Harlan Harvey Sr. of 
Prince George, Va. Harvey is a 
graduate ot Jonesboro-Hodge High 
School, where he was a varsity 
cheerleader for two years. 

Miss Mouton, a sophomore interior 
design major at NSU, was a 
cheerleader at the University of 
Soulherwestern Louisiana in Lafayette 
as a freshman last year. The daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Dubley J. Mouton Jr. 

of Lafayette, she is a graduate of 
Comeaux High School, where she was 
a varsity cheerleader for four years. 

Darlene Brown, general home 
economics major from Oakdalc, is (lie 
only other NSU student who is 
returning this fall for a third year as a 
Northwestern cheerleader. 



Windy Day 



University Bookstore 



4 



Tee 
Shirt 
Sale 



July 26, 27, 28 
ALL IMPRINTED TEE'S 

V.20% Off 



ar 



Page 6 



July 20, 1982 



Lentini Advises Veterans On Insurance Plan 



Veterans who now hold a National 
Service Life Insurance renewable term 
policy should seriously consider 
converting it to a permanent type of 
plan, advises Anthony R. Lentini, 
Director of the New Orleans Veterans 
Administration Regional Office. 

Major reasons for converting a term 
policy to permanent, he said, are that 
each time it is renewed it costs more 
and, if the policy is discontinued, the 
veteran receives nothing. 

With a permanent-type plan, there 
are certain guranteed values which 
make the policy more valuable the 
longer it is held. For example, a 
$10,000, five-year renewable term 
policy taken out at age 40 would cost a 
veteran $2,928 over a period of 20 
years. Conversly, a whole life or 



permanent-type policy (ordinary life) 
kept for the same period of time 
would: Cost the veteran $6,676 but 
provide him with a cash or loan value 
of $3,834, or provide a paid-up in- 
surance policy for $5,751, or provide a 
paid-up insurance policy for $5,751, or 
provide for $10,000 in extended in- 
surance coverage for 13 years plus 165 
days in paid-up premiums. 

A veteran should not wait too long if 
he or she expects to convert term in- 
surance. That is because the premiums 
paid for a permanent-type plan 
| depends on age. So the longer the 
j veteran waits to convert term in- 
[ surance, the more expensive it becomes 
to do so. 

If you have a question concerning 
veterans benefits or need information 



SAGA Loses 



SAGA food corporation, NSU's 
official food contractor, will be 
replaced by Professional Food 
Managers (PFM) effective September 
of 1982, according to Mike Bailes, 
SAGA Food Service Director. 

SAGA, which has had the contract 
at NSU since 1968, has lost the con- 
tract on two previous occasions, and 
both times have regained the contract 
for NSU the . following spring, said 
Bales. 



"Everytime we have lost the con- 
tract, we have come back to take it up 
again, and we hope to do it again," 
concluded Bales. 



' Bales. 



"We are concerned that there was so 
much difference in the bids," said 
He stated that PFM bid some 
$59,000 lower than SAGA. Bales 
estimated that the contract would go 
back to bid next summer. 

Bales accounted for the large dif- 
ference of money PFM underbid only 
speculatively. "It was either because 
they didn't have all the facts to bid on, 



The University Student Publications 
Committee will meet Friday, July 23, 
1982, 3:00 p.m., in the N-Club Room, 
NSU Coliseum, according to Jim 
Johnson, Chairman. 

Applications for the position of 
Current Sauce Editor should be 
submitted directly to Jim Johnson in 
the News Bureau at the Coliseum by 
noon, Thursday, July 22, 1982. 

Applications should be accompanied 
by letters of intent, stating the 
student's reasons for wanting to be 
editor, experience, and examples of 
work done in the past, is possible. 



Folk Festival 

A craftsman displays his wares at the third annual Natchitoches Folk Festival, 
held at Prather Coliseum this weekend. The Festival attracted crowds from 
around the country to exhibit the arts, sounds and foods that are a part of the 
native Louisiana heritage. 



i or assistance, call the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Regional Office in New 
Orleans using the toll-free telephone 
line to get the answer. 

Toll-free telephone service is now 
available in all 50 states providing 
direct access to Veterans Ad- 
ministration Regional Offices, An- 
thony R. Lentini, Director of the New 
Orleans Regional Office, said today in 
reminding veterans and their depen- 
dents of the service which is available 
from 7:45 a.m. to 4.T5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

Because the service is so popular, 
Lentini said veterans should have at 
hand as much VA-related information 
about themselves as possible when 
making a call. 

Lentini pointed out that VA 



counselors can provide faster service 
when the veteran's claim number, 
military serial number or Social 
Security number is provided. 

The following toll-free number is 
provided for use by veterans and their 
dependents in the State of Louisiana in 
need of assistance from the Veterans 
Administration Regional Office in 
New Orleans: 1-800-462-9510. 

The telephone number can usually 
be found in the U.S. Government 
section of local telephone directories 
under "Veterans Administration- 
Benefits Information and Assistance," 
Lentini said. In cases where a U.S. 
Government listing is not contained, 
telephone operators can supply the 
number. 



r 1 




f KNWD 

concert ticket 
give away 



cheap trick J 

Governor Appears 
At Folk Festival 



Governor Dave Treen made an 
appearance at the third annual Nat- 
chitoches Folk Festival, which 
promises to break last year's at- 
tendance records. 

The festival attracted capacity 
crowds in Prather Coliseum this 
weekend. The authentic down home 
Lousiana cookin', the real old 
fashioned rock and roll, and various 
crafts to marvel over, all were 
exhibited in an attempt to preserve the 
culture of our Louisiana heritage. 

The governor added a little light- 
hearted humor to the festivities by 
asking world-renowned fire-fighter 
"Red" Adair to "come down to Baton 
Rouge and put out Some of those fires 
in the Legislature." 

"Red" Adair to "come down to Baton 
Rouge and put out some of those fires 
in the Legislature". The governor was 
on hand to dedicate the new gifted and 
talented school, and didn't miss the 
chance to do a little politickin' and kiss 
lots and lots of babies. 

Festival Assistant Director Jim 
Johnson did not have the exact figures, 
but said, "It was much larger that last 
year, I know that it was a super show". 
Johnson said the attendance figures 
should be in by mid-week. 

Of all the exhibits to see, Rick Bryan 
of Pineville with his carved duck 
decoys, and George Allen with his 
authentic deerhide tanning were amone 



the best. But whether your fancy was 
taken by the weavers, or the 
stonegrinders who ground corn into 
meal, the age old arts of Louisiana 
were preserved, and what better place 
than in the oldest city in the Mississippi 
Valley. 

Whatever your favorite sight or 
sound was, the appreciation definitely 
should go to those who gave their, time 
and efforts to make the festival a 
success. 

One couple said they drove six hours 
to get to the festival. When asked if 
they were selling any of their! 
exquisitely carved ducks, they ex-' 
plained that if they sold the ducks, they 
would never have any to show at the 
many festivals they participate in. 
"They pay some of our expenses, but 
we really end up losing money when we 
do these. It's just that you hate to tell 
these people no when they ask you to 
come", said the woman. 

From Arkansas Slim and his 
Louisiana Honkytonk music to the 
Acadian Playboys, the cultures of 
Louisiana were tied up in one air- 
conditioned Coliseum for all who had 
the price of admission, or in the case of 
students, just a little time to spend. 
Whether the cultures were preserved of 
not, the Natchitoches Folk Festival 
drew large crowds, and those crowds 
brought with them the dollars that 
permit a fourth and fifth Folk Festival. 



July 20, 1982 



Page 7 



orts 



Rogers 



Mavericks Sign Waggoner 



Review 

After a one week layoff, this editor 
has got some more scoop for the 
readers. As you remember this 
summer Northwestern lost its track 
coach to its biggest rival, Louisiana 
Tech. The reasons are too numerous 
to even begin to mention. 

Now that Coach Dyes has left NSU 
for Ruston, so has one of the Demons 
All-Americans. Northwestern's best 
shot putter John, Campbell has now 
decided that life at Tech will be much 
better for him. Campbell told the 
papers that his reasons for leaving 
Northwestern is to follow his coach. 

In losing Campbell, the Demons 
have lost one of the best shotputters in 
the nation. The Demons, have more 
than likely also lost Campbell's little 
brother Andy, who is one of the best 
high school field men in the sport. One 
reason Campbell came to Nor- 
thwestern was because of Coach Dyes, 
who has a reputation of being one of 
the best track coaches in the nation. 
Now it looks like Northwestern has not 
only lost a fine track coach, but also a 
good recuiter in Jerry Dyes and a great 
shot putter in John Campbell. (See 
related story in Sauce) 



NATCHITOCHES, LA-Northwe- 
stern standout Wayne Waggoner was 
selected June 29 by the Dallas 
Mavericks in the 6th round of the 
National Basketball Association draft. 

Waggoner, a 6-3, 170 pound guard, 
was the leading scorer for the Demons 
last season wth a 17.6 average. He also 
led the team in free throw shooting 
percentage by hitting 86.5 percent from 
the line. For his efforts last season, he 
was ranked in the top five in the Trans 
America Conference in four statistical 
categories and was ranked 16th in the 
nation in free throw shooting. • 

Waggoner, a prep standout at 
Logansport High, was a two-season 



starter at Centenary College in 
Shreveport before joining the Nor- 
thwestern team in 1980. In his two- 
season career with the Demons, he 
combined for 165 assists and 939 total 
points. His career field goal per- 
centage was .54 percent and he shot 
85.4 percent from the charity stripe. 
He had a career total of 142 rebounds 
while at Northwestern. 

Waggoner was a starter in every 
game the Demons played the last two 
season. He was named to the first 
team all-conference team last year after 
earning second team honors as a 
junior. Waggoner led the team in 
scoring and free throw shooting the 
past two years. 



A business major from Logansport, 
Waggoner said the move to Dallas will 
be a good one for him. "I just wanted 
a chance to play," he admitted. "It 
looks like a pretty good situation for 
me going to Dallas-I'd rather be going 
there than Los Angeles or Philadelphia 
or somewhere like that because it 
would be harder for me to beat our 
someone for a position." 

Waggoner, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Bernard Waggoner of Logansport, has 
been staying with his sister in 
Shreveport and working out this 
summer while waiting for the draft. 
He is not sure when he will be called to 
report to the Mavericks. 



First Baseman, Pitcher Sign With NSU 



A power-hitting first baseman from 
Glen Oaks Junior College in Michigan 
and a pitcher from Harper Junior 
College in Illinois are the latest signees 
to ink with Northwestern State 
baseball Coach Herbie Smith. 

Robbie Moreno is a first baseman 
who played at Glen Oaks Junior 
College in Centerville, Michigan. 



Campbell Heads to Tech 



. Northwestern State All-American 
shot putter John Campbell has been 
granted a release by NSU President 
Dr. Joseph Orze and will move to 
Louisiana Tech and join former 
Demon track and field coach Jerry 
Dyes. 

Campbell requested a release from 
his scholarship commitment to 
Northwestern around his plans to 
transfer to Tech, where he will have 
two years of collegiate eligibility after 
sitting out the 1983 season. 



Dyes accepted the Tech job this 
summer after serving as NSU's track 
coach for 12 seasons. 

Campbell qualified for All- 
America honors by taking fifth place 
in the NCAA outdoor championships 
at Provo, Utah, last month with a 
school record throw of 65-8, missing 
the state collegiate record by less than 
five inches. The Bossier City-Airline 
product also took ninth place in the 
national indoor meet. 



Lady Demon All Stars 



Moreno last season was second in the 
nation in junior colleges with 12 home 
runs. Moreno carried a batting 
average of .390 this past season and 
collected 36 runs batted in. 

In his second year at Glen Oaks 
Moreno also had seven doubles while 
being named to the all-conference 
team. Moreno claimed the team 
batting title for the second straight year 
and was the Glen Oaks MVP for two 
seasons. In his first season Moreno hit 
.402 with seven homers and 34 RBls. 

As a prep player at North Liberty 
High School, Moreno lettered three 
years in baseball and two years in 
basketball. Moreno was an all- 
conference choice in his senior season. 

Moreno is 6-0, 250-pounds bats 
and throws right handed. He is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Moreno of 
North Liberty, IN. 

The latest pitcher to sign with the 
Demons is John Kolwalski, a native of 
Des Plaines, Illinois who attended 
Harper Junior College in Palatine, IL 



for the past two years. The 6-0, 180- 
pound right hander attended Forest 
View High School in Des Plaines. 

Kolwalski compiled an 18-6 record 
in his two years at Harper JC with an 
earned run average of 2.50. Kolwalski 
was named to the all-conference and 
all-district team in each of the past two 
years. 

As a prep Kolwalski had a 10-8 
record during his final season and was 
named to the Mid-Surbaban League 
all-conference team. He also led the 
league in strikeouts with 85 strikeouts 
in 65 innings. Kolwalski also par- 
ticipated in wrestling while at Forest 
View High. 

Kolwalski is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Kolwalski of Des Plaines. 

The number of Demon recruits now 
stands at six. Those to sign earlier were 
Warren Bean and Billy Stevenson of 
Bossier City, David Reynolds of 
Huntsville, TX and Doyle Potts of 
Cumby.TX. 



LA. —Northwestern State University 
will be well represented at the annual 
state all-star games tobe held in 
Lafayette on Saturday, July 3 1 . 

Northwestern will have three future 
Lady Demons in the girls all-star game 
that starts at 1:30 on July 31 in 
Southwestern Louisiana's Blackham 
Coliseum. The boys all-star contest, 
which takes place at 3:00 p.m., in 
Cajun Statium, will have four players 
who have signed to play for the Demon 
football team. 

The four football players who have 
signed with Northwestern will all 
compete for the West team in the all- 
star contest. They include Robert 
Moore, a running back and defensive 
back from Captain Shreve High in 
Shreveport; Freddie Smith, a 
linebacker and fullback from 
Haughton; Odessa Turner, a tight end 
and defensive back from Wossman 
High in Monroe and Earnest Crit- 
tendon, a linebacker and end from 
Haynesville High. 



Lady Demon Coach Pat Pierson has 
felt all along that her staff had a good 
recruiting year and the all-star rosters 
show that to be correct. 

Tandra Lewis, a 5-6 guard from 
Zachery High School, and Val 
Williams, a 6-0 forward from Grant 
High will both compete for the East 
team in the girls all-star contest and 
Regina White, a 6-3 center from 
Springhill High, will play for the West. 

In addition, guard Lonnie Banks (5- 
6) of P.G.T. Beauregard High, is an 
alternate for the East team and Teressa 
Thomas from Trinity Heights in 
Shreveport earlier competed in the 
LISA all-star contest. 

In the boys all-star game the Demons 
will have two future players on the 
West squad and one on the East team. 
DeShon Jenkins, a 6-2 guard from 
Jena High, and Donald Mays, a 6-6 
forward from Logansport will compete 
for the West. Northwestern will be 
represented on the East team by Brian 
Jolivette, an all-state guard from Holy 
Rosary High in Lafayette. 



Did you 
hear about the 




Jamboree of Bargains! 



407 Bienville 



Hours 8 - 6 Mon.-Sat. 
Phone 352-3141 



■52* 



Page 8 



July 20. 1982 




Pre-Season All- Americans 

Three Players Chosen 



Catches Like this have made Victor Oatis a pre-season choice for 
1-AA Ail-American. Other Demon stars chosen are Quarterback 
Bobby Herbert and 1981 All-American Gary Reasons. 



Intramurals 

3-on-3 Semi-Finals 



Intramural 3-on-3 basketball has 
come down to the final moments. In 
men's action To-Quick was the un- 
disputed winner by being undefeated 
throughout the tournament. In the 
final game To-Quick played the Lakers 
and true to their form they beat the 
Lakers 42-40. It was a close match-up 
and both teams played well. Ronald 
Mayweather popped the net for 16 
points and Melvin Youngblood netted 
14 for the winners. Don Hill hit 12 for 
the losers. 

In action leading up to the finals To- 
Quick met the Lakers and whipped 
them 60-48. Ronald Mayweather was 
high point man for To-Quick with 20. 
Don Hill and Tank Berry hit 22 and 20 
points respectively for the Lakers. Los 
Amigos and the Lakers played with the 
Lakers coming out on top 57-36. Don 



Hill had a hot night for the Lakers 
netting 33 points. Berto Vasquez was 
high point for Los Amigos with 18. 

In women's action UnKappa Fifth 
will play the Wild and Crazy Bunch for 
the championship. During the 
tournament Odyssey met UnKappa 
Fifth and UnKappa while Melanie 
Younger netted 16 for the Odyssey. 

UnKappa Fifth met the Wild and 
Crazy Bunch in a classic match-up. In 
the close contest UnKappa Fifth 
slipped past the Wild and Crazy Bunch 
44-42. Jenny Johnson and Tootie Cary 
hit 18 and 16 points respectively for the 
Crazy Bunch. 

In the semi-finals match the Wild 
and Crazy Bunch whipped the Odyssey 
in overtime 36-30. Pat Pierson hit 18 
points in the losing cause while Tootie 
Cary had 16 and Cheryl Newman hit 14 
points for the Crazy Bunch. 



TAAC To Lose Playoff Bid 



The Trans America Athletic 
Conference was among four leagues 
that would have to give up their 
automatic qualification for the 48- 
tcam NCAA tournament under a new 
format unveiled in Mission, Kan., by 
the Division 1 Basketball Committee 
Tuesda\ . 

The Southwestern Athletic 
Conference would also lose its 
automatic berth, and instead of an 
automatic bid as both the TAAC and 
SWAC had for the past two years, the 
champions of those two conferences 
would have to play each other [or the 
right to enter the main tournament 
draw. 

Under the new plan, the TAAC 
and SWAC champs would meet in a 
doublcheader at a neutral site that 
would also include a game beiwwen 
the ECAC North victor and the 



Midcastern Athletic Conference 
representative. 

Other conferences included in the 
nre-!ournev elimination round would 
be the ECAC Metro South, the 
Midwestern City Conference, the Ivy 
League and the East Coast Con- 
ference. 

The winners will join 20 other 
conference champions or post-season 
tournament champs as automatic 
entrants in the tournament. The 
other half of the field will be made up 
of at-largc entries. 

"We'd have preferred to have the 
automatic bid," said TAAC Com- 
missioner Bob Vanatta, "but all we 
want in this conference is the right to 
play in the NCAA Division I 
championship. This does not take 
that away. We still have that op- 
portunity. 



Northwestern State had three 
football players named to The Sporting 
News' pre-season Division I-AA Ail- 
American Football Checklist which 
appeared in the most recent edition of 
the national publication. 

Those Demons named were wide 
receiver Victor Oatis, quarterback 
Bobby Hebert and linebacker Gary 
Reasons. 

Reasons, a 6-4, 230-pound junior, 
was named to the 1-AA Kodak first 
team Ail-American sqaud last year 
after leading the Demon defense in 
tackles. Reasons is a native of 
Crowley, Tex., and has been a starter 
for NSU since midway through his 
freshman season. 

Oatis led Demon receivers a year ago 
with a school record 687 yards on 26 
receptions, an average of 26.4 yards 
per catch. Oatis' longest catch was for 
a 94-yards touchdown against Angelo 
State, and the senior speedster had five 
touchdowns last year. 



Hebert was an honorable mention 
Ail-American as asophomorewhen he 
passed for over 1,800 yards and gain 
2,099 yards in total offense. Last 
season Hebert was injured on the 
second play of the fifth game and 
missed the rest of the season with a 
knee injury. 

The pre-season checklist listed eight 
wide receivers, five quarterbacks and 
nine linebackers among its 60 players. 
Three of the five quarterbacks named 
were from Louisiana as Northeast's 
John Holman and Stephan Starring of 
McNeese State joined Hebert on the 
list. 

Other players from Louisiana 
schools listed on the team include 
offensive lineman Ronald Motton of 
Nicholls State, running back Buford 
Jordan and defensive back Leonard 
Smith of McNeese State and defensive 
lineman Robert Smith and wide receive 
Trumaine Johnson of Grambling. 



Frey, Thomas Receive Scholarship 



Northwestern State University has 
received a $300 scholarship from the 
Copenhagen-Skoal College Rodeo 
Scholarship Program administered 
each year in conjunction with the 
National Intercollegiate Rodeo 
Association. 

The scholarship was awarded to 
NSU in the names of Brian Thomas of 
Natchitoches and Mark Frey of 
Morganza, Northwestern students who 
recently won the second go-round of 
team roping at the NIRA's College 
National Finals Rodeo in Bozeman, 
Mont. 

Walt Garrison, western marketing 
representative for Copenhagen-Skoal, 
said the scholarship is to be used ex- 



clusively for the education of a par- 
ticipant in the intercollegiate rodeo 
program at Northwestern. 

More than $125,000 is awarded to 
college students each year through the 
Copenhagen-Skoal College Rodeo 
Scholarship Award Program. 
Established in 1974 to help young 
people receive a higher education, the 
program has awarded almost half a 
million dollars to thousands of 
students who prticipate in in- 
tercollegiate rodeo. 

The scholarships are given out on 
both regional and national levels. Over 
$93,000 is presented to regional 
winners, and more than $32,000 is 
awarded to winners at the College 
National Finals Rodeo. 



1982 Football Schedule 


Sept. 4 


NSU vs Mississippi College 
Natchitoches 


7:00 pm 


Sept. 11 


NSU vs Angelo State 
San Angelo, Texas 


7:30 pm 


Sept. 8 


NSU vs Stephen F. Austin 
Nacogdoches, Texas 


7:30 pm 


Sept. 25 


NSU vs Abilene Christian 
Natchitoches (Homecoming) 


7:00 pm 


Oct. 2 


NSU vs East Texas State 
Commerce, Texas 


7:30 pm 


Oct. 9 


NSU vs McNeese State 
Lake Charles 


7:30 pm 


Oct. 16 


NSU vs Alcorn 
Natchitoches 


7:00 pm 


Oct. 23 


NSlJvsLa. Tech 
Shreveport (State Fair) 


7:00 pm 


Oct. 30 


OPEN DATE 




Nov. 6 


NSU vs Nicholls State 
Natchitoches 


7:00 pm 


Nov. 13 


NSU vs Southeastern 
Natchitoches 


7:00 pm 


Nov. 20 


NSU vs Northeast 
Monroe 


7:00 pm 




urrent 




auce 




Vol. No. LXX No. 4 



Northwestern State University 

Natchitoches, Louisiana September 14, 1982 Page 1 




DUCKS CATCH A GLIMPSE OF THE ACTION 
A flock of Chaplin's Lake ducks temporarily yield the right of way to 
students of the P.E. 017 class, the canoeing class. These ducks have become 
almost as synonymous with NSU as the Demon. 



SGA Plans Semester Events 



The outlook is optimistic 
for Northwestern's Student 
Government Association this 
year. According to SGA 
President Joe Stamey, the 
SGA has been making big 
plans for upcoming events 
including Homecoming, State 
Fair Week and the 
Distinguished Lecture Series. 

Although the State Fair 
activities are tentative as of 
now, various events have been 
slated for Homecoming Week, 
September 20-25. 

These events include Fun 
Runs of one mile and of 5000 
meters (3.1 miles) on Monday 
of Homecoming Week. Slated 
for Tuesday September 21 is 
the Miller Tug-Of-War which 
will be held behind Iberville 
Cafeteria. On Wednesday, 
there will be a "Meet the 
Team" and Homecoming 
party at the NSU Recreation 
Complex from 8-11 p.m. 
featuring the NSU En- 
tertainers. Thursday is 
designated as "Spirit Day" 



and all students are urged to 
wear Northwestern t-shirts. 
Plans are being made with 
area merchants to give 

discounts on Thursday to 
students wearing NSU tees 
who present their university 
identification. Friday will see 
Northwestern's annual 
Homecoming Parade. This 
year, the parade will begin on 
the river bank at 6:00 p.m. and 
will wind up in front of 
Prather Coliseum where a pep 
ralley and street dance are 
planned. 

Two guests are scheduled to 
appear this semester in the 
SGA's Distinguished Lecture 
Series. They include Pulitzer 
Prize - winning author 
Jonathan Kozel on October 13 
and Dr. Arthur Laffe whose 
"Laffer's Curve" was the 
basis for Ronald Reag n's 
economic policy on November 
16. 

Stamey stated that there had 
been numerous applications 



from NSU students, especially 
freshmen, expressing interests 
in SGA committees. "These 
committees are each chaired 
by an SGA senator" and 
NSU students may join as 
many committees as they like 
and may do so at any time, 
Stamey said. Applications are 
available at the SGA office in 
the Student Union. 

Student government officers 
have been elected at both 
Shreveport nursing campuses, 
according to Stamey. ADOS 
officers are: Bridget Evans, 
president; Richard Treadway, 
vice-president; Mary Hef- 
fington, secretary; and Carol 
Anderson, commissioner of 
elections. Officers at 
Warrington are: Sharon 
Chaney, president; John 
Russell, vice-president; Nancy 
Hensley, secretary; Pauline 
Soileau, treasurer; and Andrea 
Baumgardner, commissioner 
of elections. 



Hix Appointed Dean 
College of Business 



Dr. John L. Hix, marketing 
professor in Northwestern's 
Department of Business 
Administration and 
Economics since 1968, has 
been appointed interim dean 
of. the NSU College of 
Business. 

For the past 12 years, Hix 
has also served as director of 
research for the College of 
Business and as director of the 
Masters of Business Ad- 
ministration degree program 
which is offered through the 
Department of Accounting 
and the Department of 
Business Administration and 
Economics. 

Northwestern President Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze announced 
Hix's appointment this week 
following approval by the 
Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities. Hix succeeds Dr. 
David Townsend, who retired 
this summer as NSU's Dean of 
Business. 

Hix became director of 
graduate studies in business 
administration in 1970. Since 
he assumed the position, the 
Masters ' of Business Ad- 
ministration degree program 
at NSU has experienced ex- 
ceptional growth. 

More than 80 graduate 
students are enrolled in 



Northwestern's MBA 
program, which the university 
offers at three different 
locations. The complete MBA 
sequence program offered by 
Northwestern is available at 
Fort Polk, Louisiana College 
in Pineville and at NSU in 
Natchitoches primarily as an 
evening schedule for business 
people. 

Although his field of ex- 
pertise is marketing, Hix also 
has extensive experience as a 
management consultant and 
researcher. For six years, he 
was one of the management 
consultants for the First-line 
Supervisors Seminar sponsored 
by Centenary College in 
Shreveport. He was also a 
major consultant for the 18- 
month supervisory techniques 
training program conducted 
for Riley-Beaird, Inc., em- 
ployees in Shreveport. 

The NSU professor has 
presented supervisory 
seminars for the Veterans 
Administration Hospital in 
Pineville and for management 
personnel at Fort Polk. 

Author of several 
publications on management, 
Hix is one of the investigators 
in a new research project to 
determine non-financial 
rewards in supervision and 
motivation. 



Name of Check Forger 
to Be Disclosed 



A federal judge has ordered 
the U.S. Department of 
Health and Human Services to 
disclose to Northwestern the 
name of an individual holding 
Social Security number 437- 
25-0517. 

That number was used in 
cashing an apparently forged 
check at the university in 
Natchitoches. 

U.S. District Judge Frank 
Polozola earlier ordered the 
government agency to provide 
the information or show cause 
why it wouldn't. 

The government responded 



that it would "if so ordered by 
this court." Polozola issued 
an order Monday. 

He said that under the 
Privacy Act a government 
agency may disclose in- 
formation for bona fide law 
enforcement purposes or if 
ordered by the court. 

Polozola gave the govern- 
ment 15 days to tell a law 
enforcement officer or official 
of the state or Northwestern, 
upon proper identification, 
the name of the individual 
holding the Social Security 
number. 



Homecoming Elections Wednesday 



■ 



Current Sauce, Page 2. Sentemher 14. 1982 



Dr. Joseph Orze Enters First Year As President of NSU 



By Pat Skidmore 
Co-Focus Editor 

Dr. Joseph J. Orze, Nor- 
thwestern's 15th president, 
officially took office on June 
1, 1982. He had previously 
served as president of 
Worecester State College in 
Massachusettes since 1975. 

A native of Exeter, PA, 
Orze holds bachelor and 
masters degrees from yracuse 
University and a doctorate in 
higher education from George 
Peabody College. Some of his 
accomplishments include his 
having served as a professor 
dean, department chairman 
and treasurer at universities in 
New York, Tennessee, 
Connecticut and 
Massachusettes as well as 
having delivered major ad- 
dresses at various programs 
across the nation and being the 
author of several articles for 
professional and scholarly 
journals. He also has an 
active part in community 
affairs and other 
organizations. 

In an interview conducted 
for the SAUCE, Orze said that 
he likes NSU and the Nat- 
chitoches community very 
much and that he has really 
enjoyed talking with the 
students he has met; he then 
stated, "1 also like the fact 
that students are so concerned 
about the institution." 

Interestingly enough, 
Northwestern's professor/st- 
udent ratio is the lowest in 
Louisiana. Orze commented, 
"Fortuntely, the state 
provides us money to operate 
in the way we do." 

Feeling that people would 
probably be surprised about 
the number of scholarships 



available to upperclassmen as 
well as freshmen (who may 
have earned several upon high 
school graduation), he em- 
phasized the fact that 
"schools, in most instances, 
play a big part in giving out 
scholarships" and mentioned 
that some local organizations 
also award deserving students. 
The NSU Foundation, located 
in Caldwell Hall (1st floor), is 
a good place to secure in- 
formation pertinent to this, he 
said. 

Judging from present 
enrollment figures, Orze 
anticipates that the number of 
full-time undergraduates will 
be much higher than in recent 
years. There has been a real 
population growth on off- 
campus sites in the last few 
years, says Orze, because our 
extensions are so convenient 
for people and this accounts 
for much of the large number 
of part-time students. The 
NSU-Shreveport carnpus, for 
example, had such a record 
enrollment that "we approved 
an evening division (of 
classes).... we can handle more 
people this way," states Orze. 
He further mentioned that 
adjunct professors were hired 
on all of the NSU campuses, 
too. 

Orze said that a strong 
athletics program is an asset at 
any school because they are 
such a vital "part of the 
university situation" and 
certainly a ' most visible 
aspect" but he stresses the 
academic aspect too believing 
that Northwestern is an 
outstanding academic in- 
stitution. 

One of Orze's long-term 
goals is "a major 
reorganization of the 




Joe Stamey (right) of Natchitoches, president of the 
Student Government Associaton at Northwestern is 
sworn in as the new student representative on the 
Board of Trustees for Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities. Board president Wiley H. Sharp Jr. of 
Hammond watches as the oath to Stamey is ad- 
minstered by Leonard Kleinpeter, First Assistant 
Secretary of State for Louisiana. As one of the 18 
voting members of the management board, Stamey 
will represnt he students and SGA officials of the 
nine colleges and universities under the jurisdiction of 
the Board of Trustees. The senior accounting major 
at NSU began his one-year term this summer. 



university's organizational 
structure, both academically 
and administratively," and 
said that it will take time, thus 
the change would be a gradual 
one. He has encouraged input 
from university personnel. 



Orze also said, smiling, 
"I'm very pleased to be here, 
and I look forward to working 
with everyone and getting to 
know them in the process." 
He then added, "I would like 
to see the university attain the 
excellence it can have that 
would place it among the best 
in Louisiana, the south, and 
the nation." 



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Same Old Faces 
In La. Congress 



September 14, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 3 



Tornado Destroys 12 Homes in Concordia 



By The Associated Press 

(From wire reports) 

Louisiana's congressional 
delegation will have a familiar 
look next term: the same six 
democrats and two 
republicans. And, as usual, 
there will be a Long-eighth 
district representative, Gillis 
Long--and a Boggs-- 
Congresswoman Lindy Boggs 
in the second district. The six 
incumbents on Saturday's 
open primary ballot easily won 
re-election, five of them by 
margins of 3 to 1 or better. 
The exception was Long, who 
survived a scare from a 
conservative two-term state 
senator, Ned Randolph, to 
gain his seventh term. Win- 
ning re-election and avoiding 
November run-offs were, in 
addition to Long and the 66- 
year old Mrs. Boggs, 
Republicans Henson Moore 
and Bob Livingston and 
Democrats John Breaux and 
Jerry Huckaby. Two 
democratic incumbents, Billy 



Tauzin and Buddy Roemer, 
drew no opponents and were 
re-elected without appearing 
on the ballot. 

In the Alexandria mayor's 
race, incumbent Carroll 
Lanier faces another runoff 
against the man he ousted in 
1973, John Snyder, after a 
virtual deadlock in Saturday 
night's primary race. 

Snyder collected 4763 votes 
or 32.5 percent, to Lanier's 
4660 votes or 31.8 percent, in 
unofficial returns, Snyder, a 
59-year old promotions 
consultant, attempted to 
regain his office four years 
ago, when the 55-year old 
Lanier beat him again in a 
runoff. Three other can- 
didates trailed the two front- 
runners. 

Sixty-three-year old Champ 
Baker had 17 percent and 44- 
year old Charles Bollinger got 
14 percent. Charles Ray 
Sweazie, the only black in the 
race, had four percent. 



Hinckly: Leave The 
Insanity Plea Alone 



By The Associated Press 

The man who shot President 
Reagan says America should 
"leave the insanity defense 
alone." In a letter to 
"Newsweek" magazine, John 
W. Hinckly Jr., writes that 
abolishing the defense would 
be "a travesty of justice." 
Hinckly was found innocent 
last June of shooting Reagan 



by reason of insanity. 

In his regular Saturday 
morning radio chat, Reagan 
said he was proposing changes 
in the laws that allow insanity 
to be used as a defense. But 
Hinckly writes that the laws 
shouldn't be changed, and 
that society should "show 
some compassion for its 
disturbed outcasts." 



Any commuter student 
wishing to help the SUGB in 
the afternoons showing 
movies, etc., come by Room 
214 of the Student Union and 
speak to Camile Hawthorne. 



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By The Associated Press 

A tornado destroyed 12 
homes and torrential rains 
forced the evacuation of 
several hundred residents 
Sunday, as the remnants of 
tropical storm Chris howled 
across northeast Louisiana. 

Officials speculate that 
inland damage will exceed the 
damage along the coast, where 
the storm hit Saturday. No 
injuries were reported in either 
the tornado that demolished a 
series of homes between 
Clayton and Ferriday or the 
deluge that filled the streets of 
Delhi and Tallulah. 



Concordia Parish Sheriff 
John Patrick says the tornado 
touched down along U.S. 84 
shortly before 1:00 a.m. and 
paralleled the highway for 
about a mile, demolishing a 
dozen houses. He says in most 
cases, the wind just lifted the 
roof right off the house. In 
Delhi, water flowed several 
feet deep along downtown 
streets after more than nine 
inches of rain fell Saturday 
morning. Mayor Mike 
Thompson estimates losses in 
the millions of dollars, and 
says most businessmen in the 



upland city did not carry flood 
insurance. About 400 Delhi 
residents were evacuated. 

Water was draining from 
the streets by mid-afternoon, 
and Thompson says most 
residents probably would be 
able to return home before 
evening. 

By afternoon, the severe 
thunderstorms accompanying 
the dying storm had moved 
into northwest Mississippi, 
where officials posted flood 
warnings. 



Zappa Heirs Follow Daddy 



By The Associated Press 

Moon Zappa isn't one of 
the pretty boys. She's a 

14-year-old girl— with her first 
hit. It's called "Valley Girl"-- 
and, admittedly, it has a lot to 
do with Moon's father, Frank 
Zappa. 

Frank created some 
background music-and then 
got Moon to record a 
monologue in what you might 
call "Teenspeak." 

A few samples are in order: 
The next time you wany to say 
that something is cool or hip, 
try "Tubular." Or if 
something's gross or 
disgusting, you might say it 
was "Grody." And be sure to 
throw in the word "Totally" 
whenever you're in need of 
some verbal filler. 



Those marvelous elocutions 
are what help Moon Zappa 
describe such important 
teenage events as a trip to the 
shopping mall-a "Tubular" 
experience-or having to do 
the dishes — definitely 
"Grody." 

Moon says that she herself is 
not a Valley Girl. "Valley" 
refers to the San Fernando 
Valley near Los Angeles-and 
the Zappas live in Laurel 
Canyon. Anyway, she says 
the whole thing was her 
Father's idea. 

So, by the way, is her name. 
In full, it' Moon Unit Zappa. 
Explains Miss Zappa: "Unit 
is probably because I'm the 
first unit in the Zappa family, 
kidwise." 



...Just thought we'd do a 

little name dropping... 

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unnci * 



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Namewise, it could have 
been worse. Before his 
daughter was born, Frank 
gave his pregnant wife a choice 
between "Moon Unit" and 
"Motorhead." She made the 
decision. But now Moon and 
her brother Dweezil may be 
getting some revenge. They're 
recording a song called "My 
Mother Is A Space Cadet." 



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ORGANIZATIONAL 

CARDS DUE 
OCTOBER 1 FROM 
EVERY CHARTER 
ON CAMPUS 
If the organization did not 
receive a renewal card, 
check with your sponsor 
or come by Student 
Union Room 214. 
Camille Hawthorne 
Coordinator of 
Orgaimations 
& Student Activities 



POSTING 
REGULATIONS 
FOR THE 
STUDENT UNION 

All signs posted in the 
Student Union Building 
must be approved in 
Student Union Room 
214 before placement. 
Place advertisements 
only on bulletin boards 
Those items posted on 
painted surfaces, glass, 
etc or not approved for 
posting will be taken 
down. Thank you for 
taking care of our 
building. 



Opinion 

The Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the! 
author's. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
University, its administration, the students or even the rest of 
the Current Sauce staff. The Current Sauce invites letters to the 
editor, which must be signed, as well as guest editorials, which 
must also be signed. Address all correspondence to Current 
Sauce, Room 225 Keyser Hall. 

Current Sauce, Page 4, September 14, 1982 



But Maybe He Should Have 



Reagan Hasn't Sold Out 



Tomorrow is the big election day for the 1982 Homecoming 
Court. It sure seems redundent to say this, but everyone, 
PLEASE make an effort to vote. Tomorrow 16 girls names will 
appear on a ballot, and it is up to you to make sure which of 
these Northwestern ladies will represent us at our own 
Homecoming game. 

And while we are on the subject of this particular election, it 
seems that there are a few rather unfortunate circumstances that 
do need to be pointed out about this selection (not election, the 
selection). 

It seems rather unfortunate, but to some, this is not an 
election of honor, it is an election of neccessity. Let me explain. 

It seems that a small number of girls, every time an election of 
this sort rolls around, feel as though they must campaign, albeit 
secretly of course, but campaign nevertheless for a position on 
one of the courts. Before I go any farther, let me say that this is a 
small number, and should not be indicative of the whole court. 
But, this small percentage of girls feels compelled to "trade", 
"exchange", or manipulate enough votes so that they are put on 
the ballot. The "deals" that are made are sometimes un- 
believabley humiliating, at least from an outside viewpoint, but 
then again, in this case, what's a little foot kissing (to put it 
mildy) when something as big as college court is concerned. 

Let us interject one more thing. Let's don't put any of the 
blame on the SGA or their system. Their system of open 
nominations and then a secret election is as sound as can be. No 
argument there. The problem lies with the two or three girls who 
each year slither around, trying to find that elusive "fifth" 
nomination that puts their names on the ballot. 

When you go to the polls Wednesday, do yourself and the vast 
majority of the nominees a favor. Vote for the girls who best 
represent NSU and not those that put on the best campaign. To 
be nominated and then elected to the Homecoming Court should 
be an honor, not a reward for a good two weeks of hard 
politicking. And aother thing, when you step into that booth, 
remember the girls who have been friendly and warm ever since 
you have known them and who have not put on any special 
charms in the last week and a half to try to win your vote. 

In closing, I'd like to direct this comment to the vast majority 
of girls who were put on the ballot and who didn't solicit the 
nominations. It is indeed an honor for you to have been 
nominated for the Homecoming Court. You know that you 
haven't made any deals for any votes, and so do most everyone 
else. And I hope, just like everyone else, that it is you girls who 
really consider it an honor, not a social neccessity, will win the 
election and be counted as members of Northwestern State 
University's 1982 Homecoming Court. 



Editor Advertising Manager 

Joe Cunningham Jr. Alison Breazeale 



Co-News Editor 
Barbie Hall 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Editor 
Susan Arthur 



Co-News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Dianna Grafton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saviors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatlev 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Currenl Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern Stale 
University in Natchitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter al 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. t«70. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester. with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224, Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is J57-S4Se. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce, 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns arc 
solely ihose of the writer and do not 
necessarily represenl ihe viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, siaff. or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to (he editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern' 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publicaiion. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and musi not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous 

Currenl Sauce reserves the right to edit Ihe 
letter lor journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce, NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 




John Hess 

John Hess is a syndicted 
columnist of the United 
Feature Syndicate 

"President Reagan is 
seeking to raise taxes in order 
to cut spending further." — 
White House Cheif of Staff 
James A. Baker 1/1. 

I know it's sinful of me but 
I'm getting a charge out of 
polities such as I haven't 
enjoyed in decades. 

Ronald Reagan whooping it 
up for the biggest tax hike — 
a.k.a. revenue increase — in 
history and promising to whup 
those Republican jackasses in 
Washington. 

Lyn Nofziger, Reagan's 
Chuck Colson, petitioning 
him not to do it, then swit- 
ching sides and threatening 
those renegades with "hard- 
ball" punishment at the 
polls... 

Anne Gorsuch taking space 
in The New York Times to tell 
how she's turned into a 
defender of the environment... 

And the radicals of the 
Right accusing them all of 
selling out to the Eastern 
liberal establishment... 

I love it. 

Reagan has, of course, not 



sold out at all. He just had the 
hard luck of winning an 
election and carrying out his 
radical program. 

In his first year, he pushed 
through tax cuts of $750 
billion and increases in 
military spending of $1.5 
trillion for the remainder of 
his term. He and his fellow 
supply-siders said the tax cuts 
would set off a boom that 
would balance the budget. 

After the euphoria of those 
early months, sophisticated 
conservatives began tiptoeing 
toward the exit. First out were 
Northern boll weevils like Sen. 
Moynihan and Mayor Kick of 
New York. Then a trickle of 
publicists of the New right like 
Kevin Phillips and Rudolph 
Penner of the American 
Enterprise pegged 
Reaganomics as a bust. 
Lately, it's become a rout. 

George Will admitted that, 
if not the rats, at least the 
hamsters were deserting the 
ship. Whatever they are, they 
are not lemmings. Survival, 
not suicide, is their game. 

Recent issues of The 
Conservative Digest and the 
neo-conservative Policy 
Review suggest to me that the 
radicals want to put distance 
between them and Reagan so 
as not to be caught in the 
whirlpool as the ship goes 
down. 

This may be intelligent, but 
it's hardly fair. Reagan has 
been a true heir to the 
Goldwater wing of the party. 
Barring a few compromises 
such as any politician must 
make in a still democratic 
state, such as fulfilling his 
promise to lift the grain 



President Orze Comments 



In the past week or so 
several people have com- 
mented to me that Fall was in 
the air. Although I could feel 
no change in the air or the 
weather in general, I have felt 
the excitement of Fall since the 
last week in August when the 
semester started. The students 
and all the activity that is 
associated with them is what 
put the feeling of Fall in the air 
for me. 

The University is once again 
a teeming vibrant ecological 
system. The campus en- 
vironment awakened to life 
and action by the return of the 
students. Students are the 
raison d'etre of the University, 
its reason for being. Without 
students there is is no 
university; only a campus 
exists, a collection of buildings 
on an expanse of land peopled 
by faculty, administrators and 



staff without a reason for 
being there without students 
to teach, to counsel, to 
mentor, to work with, to 
serve. 

Northwestern State 
University prides itself on 
being a friendly and caring 
institution. It needs to 
continually strive to make 
what is a motto into an ever 
stronger reality. Friendliness 
is a pervasive quality, and 
when you give a smile you 
always get at least one back. 

1 am pleased to be a part of 
Northwestern State University 
and to experience my first Fall 
on campus. Let us work 
together to make this the start 
of a new and vital future for 
the University. I look forward 
to that opportunity. 

Best wishes for a great year. 
Eniov yourselves! 



embargo, he has carried out 
the plan, in spades. 

He has been as hard-nosed 
as anybody but a total 
madman could wish toward 
the Russians, the Third World 
and our allies; he has deleted 
human rights as a factor in 
foreign policy and stalled 
progress toward arms control. 
The trouble is, the world has 
not -responded as it was 
supposed to. 

He has lathered the rich, 
Watted the environment and 
made war on the welfare state. 

Trouble is, the economy 
hasn't responded as it was 
supposed to, and the country 
is resisting further assaults on 
the old, the sick and the poor. 

In truth, the thunder from 
the right has been more of a 
screech. To call Republicans 
liberals because they once 
supported George Bush is to 
abuse the vocabulary. 

It may indeed be silly to 
raise taxes during a recesion, 
but that is a Keynesian 
argument, not a supply-side 
one. 

(It's not my argument, 
either. The only solution to 
the deficit lies in halting a 
runaway military budget. 
Besides, the new bill com- 
plicates the tax code further, 
instead of simplifying it. But 
that's another story.) 

Never mind. The radicals 
want to break with Reagan, 
and this is as good a handle as 
any. 

Me, I'm like the legendary 
mountain woman watching 
her husband chasing a bear, or 
vice versa, around a tree: Got 
it, husband; go it, bear. It's a 
lovely fight. 




mttfttMitttmmMimmM*: 



Guest Editorial 



September 14, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 5 



By Julio A. Aquirre 

Mr. Aguirre is a graduating 

senior majoring in Political 

Science 

Summer in New York 

On May 16, I left NSU for 
the "exciting" life in New 
York city, of course, it was to 
be "exciting" along with some 
studies done there. During the 
Spring Semester 82, I was 
"tired" of the 'quietness" 
that surrounds this beautiful 
city of Natchitoches. What 
was then left for this NSU 
student? Nothing else but to 
go to New York city and enroll 
in one of the many university 
it offers. 

I always have been attracted 
to the studies of Political 
Science with special emphasis 
in International Relations. 
Since the United Nations 
Headquarters is in New York 
City, I was on my way to enjoy 
the many sessions that are 
open to the public. Especially, 
the United Nations Security 
Council on the Falklands 
Islands War. As you may 
recall that was one of the main 
international conflicts at that 
time. Later, of course, came 
along the audacity of 
Menachen Begin and Ariel 
Sharon (Prime Minister and 
Minister of Defense of Israel 
respectively): The invasion in 
Lebanon. The invasion of 
Israel into Lebanon im- 
mediately made the Falklands 
Islands War a relic of the past. 

At the United Nations one 
sees an ego contest that reveals 
the dichotomy of human 
nature: Representatives from 
different nations become 
personal friends, yet each 
longs for the defeat of the 
other. 

The "Big Apple," as New 
Yorkers call their city, not 
only has the United Nations 
Headquarters, but the "Big 
Apple" offers from the 
greatest things to the not so 
great. I did not enjoy the 
latter, and there was plenty of 
it. 

As soon as I had arrived, I 
attempted to enroll at 
Columbia University. "No 
problem" said the ad- 
ministrator at the Registrar's 
Office at Columbia 
University, since I had per- 
mission from the Dean of my 
school. But when I found out 
that in order to take six 
"units" (I'd have to pay 
$218.00 per unit), it was going 



to be $1,308.00. "Oh no," i" 
said, "with that much, I can 
certainly study one regular 
semester at NSU. And that 
includes a nice soft bed in 
Rapides Hall and three robust 
(I said robust, not tasty) meals 
every day of the week at the 
Ibeville Dining Hall. 

So, I tried Fordham 
University. Perhaps, I 
though, it is less expensive. It 
was. Still, it wasn't within my 
budget. Per unit cost at 
Fordham University was 
$120.00. "Oh no," I said 
again, "with that much, I can 
study a Summer Session at 
NSU, including room and 
board." 

I continued my adventure in 
the "jungles" of that 
beautiful city of New York. 
Meanwhile, I had received so 
many letters from Winnfield, 
from the person I care so 
much. One of those letters 
suggested that I should have 
gotten a job. But since it was 
supposed be a studying 
vacation, why spoil it? 

Finally, I arrived at the City 
University of New York. This 
university charges $60,00 per 
unit. '"Hey, that is only 
$360.00, I am here to stay 
madam." I said to the lady at 
the Registrar's Office. Well, I 
came to New York City and I 
have conquered it, I thought. 

To find an apartment in 
New York City is an ordeal. I 
came close to a nervous 
breakdown, when they told me 
the prices for renting an 
"apartment" that one could 
possibly have found in the 
entire universe. 

By now, all my thoughts 
were back at NSU. How 
lovely NSU is I began to 
realize. How I missed the 
friends I had left behind. 
Most of all, I missed so much, 
the person whom I love. 

My final exams were on 
Monday , r August 2, Tuesday, 
the very next day, at six 
o'clock in the morning, I was 
at La Guardia Airport. I was 
rushing back to Natchitoches 
to see this beautiful NSU and, 
to see the girl who means a lot 
to me. 

Of all the places tht I have 
been, to me, the most special 
place has become Nat- 
chitoches. Since I love the old, 
I love Natchitoches. To live in 
Natchitoches is to live 
graciously and pleasantly. I 
can proudly say: "NSU is the 
place for you," and me too. 



Letters 



August 30, 1982 

The Student Government Association was 
called to order by Stacy Soileau at 6:00 p.m. 
Troy Davidson said the prayer and Eileen 
Haynes led the pledge. Absent were: Scott 
Repp, Ernie Cole, David Dcville, Don Stacy, 
Ed Wartdte, Kristi Heyd, Noel Nicolle. 
Peyton Cunningham and David Saviors. 
OFFICER REPORTS 

Joe Stamey announced the Parliamentary 
Procedure class will be held on Wed. at 2:00. 
At that time, there will be a different time 
announced for the class. 

Joe said that he met with the Warrington- 
ADOS representatives in Shrcveport where 
they told him their major concern was their 
continued problem with parking on campus. 

Joe also asked for some recommendations 
for Homecoming and State Fair chairmen. He 
reminded the senators of the next SGA 
meeting, Monday, Sept. 6, at 6:00. He told the 
senate to start having their committee 
meetinss. 



SGA Minutes 



Stacy Soileau thanked the senators for the 
good attendance at the Fal) workshop. Absent 
from the workshop were: Ernie Cole, David 
Dcville, Ed Wartelle, Dean Napoli, Kristi 
Heyd, Noel Nicolle, Peyton Cunnington and 
David Saylors. 

Stacy also asked the senators for some ' 
suggestins for Parlimentarian. 

Larry Hall told the senators that nobody is 
to charge anything to the SGA without Joe, 
Larry, or Allison's permission. He also an- 
nounced that SGA ended up the summer in 
good financial standing. Larry also announced 
that the SGA budget committee will begin 
reviewing the budgets of the dther student fee 
receiving organizations. 

Harlan Harvey announced that Sept. 15, 
1982 will be the dale for the Homecoming 
Elections. Notices of intention for senator are 
now available in the SGA office. He also said 
that Sept. 29 will be the Senator elections, with 
the runoff elections Oct . 6. 



Dear Current Sauce 

NSU worries about 
financial trouble when it's 
sitting on a gold mine. I know 
of a ro ch farm that buys 
roaches at a reasonable price. 
"Profit", for lab study. How 
many times have you come in 
from going out and turned the 
light on in your dorm room 
and wondered if the bed was 
still there. I had the pleasure 
of staying in Natchitoches 
dorm this summer. Now I 
know why I live in Rapides. It 

Dear Editor, 

I always enjoy driving 
through the NSU campus 
whenever I am in Nat- 
chitoches. The campus is 
pretty and, for the most part, 
the architectual style and 
landscaping go well with each 
other and with North 
Louisiana in general. One 
glaring inconsistency has 
bothered me year after year, 
however, and that is the 
Library and its front lawn. 
The boxy concrete building is 
relieved only by a square 
awkward fountain that never 
has water and ugly concrete 
benches that no one ever sits 
on. Wouldn't the area facing 
College. Ave. be much nicer if 
it were planted with pines, 
dogwoods, and crepe myrtles? 
This would make a worthwhile 
project for someone with 
instant and obvious results. 

Jayle Nesom 
NSU Alumne 



Editor Current Sauce 

The Sisters of Sigma Kappa 
would like to express our 
appreciation to the people of 
the City of Natchitoches, the 
NSU Cheerleaders, the 
Student Government 
Association, and the Students 
of Northwesten for hosting 
such an exciting pep rally on 
Front Street before the NSU- 
Mississippi College football 
game Saturday, September 4, 
1982. We would like to en- 
courage all NSU students to go 
out and support the Demons. 
We would also like to say 
"good luck" to Coach A.L. 
Williams and the Demons for 
a successful football season. 
Sigma Kappa says "Fork 'em 
Demons!" 

Sincerely, The Sisters 
. of Sigma Kappa Sorority 



NEW BUSINESS 

Perry Anderson moved to open nominations 
for Homecoming Court. Don Stacy seconded. 
Motion passed. 

Jack Welch moved to close nominations. 
Troy Davidson seconded. Motion passed. 
Nominated were: Allison Arthur, Laurie 
Weaver, and Deanna Grau. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Christine A van: announced the Delta Zeta 
Welcome Back Dance Wed. at 8 p.m. 

Joe Stamey reminded the senators about the 
Pep Rally, Sat. at 12:00 noon on Front Street. 

Allison Arthur announced the KICK OFF 
Party at LODA on Thursday at 6:00 p.m. 

Harlan announced thai the Homecoming 
nominations close on Fri. September 10. 

Don Stacy moved to adjourn. Troy 
Davidson seconded. Motion passed. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Allison Arthur Secretary 



might be a rat hole, but I don t 
have to bolt or tie down all of 
my belongings so rooches 
don't walk away with it. 
"C.S." the office with the 
initials of many names is back 
on campus with full force. 
You'd think it was Christmas 
the way they were handing out 
the little orange greeting cards. 
It's a pleasure getting tickets 
for parking in student parking 
lots. This might help you 
offer whoever, turn your map 
right side up, its easier to read 
where the student and staff 
zones are. Do you want me to 
continue? On a roll. Boy and 
we thought Saga was bad. I 
come to realize that SAGA 
was like eating at the Hilton 
compared to PFM (serving 
America's Finest Students) 
which won't be for long. 
Don't they say good nutrition 
leads to keener thoughts. 



Have you started to notice the 
Dha's around campus. If 
we're not careful it can break 
out into epidemic proportion. 
Does PFM have a contract 
with businesses in town, 
around lunch and supper. 
That's on their parking lot, 
you see alot of NSU stickers. 
The town doesn't mind. 
Come on Linda and everyone 
in charge (name unknown) we 
pay the same as last semester, 
let's see some of the same 
quality that SAGA got us 
accustomed to. It wasn't like 
home, but no whereas near a 
now, Kal-Can even looks 
good. If not my food will end 
up on the floor where it 
belongs. 

Hi, Housing it's mission 
impossible thanks for the 
Baby Blue Room. 

NSU is my Home 
Curt Br oudreaux 



News From the 
Placement Office 

Do you have a few extra minutes? We have several hand-out 
items that could possibly provide the ideas or incentive you need 
to prepare yourself for a job search. Seniors (90 hours and 
above) need to drop by and pick up a College Placement An- 
nual, read our literature and listen to our tapes. 
A NEW FACE 

We have Martha Kittrell, (graduate student) who is director of 
our part-time service. If you are in need of part-time work to aid 
in financing educational expenses, come visit with her and fill 
out an application. Available jobs range from three hours to 
forty hours a week, from one day to seven days a week and she 
wants to aid in matching your needs and interests with the right 
job. 

Be sure to come tjy periodically and read our bulletin boards 
(located on both second floor and third floor, Student Union) 
for information on full-time, as well as part-time jobs and job 
opporutnities. Small bulletin boards are located throughout the 
campus. 

EMPLOYER VISIT 

Our first on-campus recruiter will be Mary Dell Neill with 
Louisiana Machinery, she will be on campus September 29, 
1982. You may schedule an interview time by dropping by the 
Placement Office. 
DON'T MISS... 

Resume Writing Workshop Interview Workshop 

September 14, 15 September 21 , 22 

Room 320 Room 320 

3:00-4:00 3:00-4:30 



Job Search Workshop 
September 28, 29 
Room 320 
3:00-4:30 



Government Employment 
Federal, State Workshop 
October 5, 6 
3:00-4:30 



December Graduates - If you are looking for a job and want to 
start today, our publication, JOBS has a listing of positions 
throughout Louisiana. Drop by the Placement Office and pick 
up a copy. 



Wednesday August 25 Homecoming Court Nominations 

open and Class Senator Filings open 
Friday September 10 Homecoming Court Nomiations Close 
Wednesday September 15 Homecoming Elections 

Thursday September 16 Nominations for State Fair Court Open 



Friday September 17 
Wednesday September 29 

Wednesday October 6 

Monday October 1 1 
Monday October 25 
Wednesday November 3 
^e^ngda^JovejTibei^^ 



Class Senator Filings Close 
Class Senator Elections 
State Fair Nominations Close 
Class Senator Run Off Elections 
State Fair Elections 
Mr. /Miss. NSU Nominations Open 
Mr. /Miss. NSU Nominations Close 
Mr. /Miss NSU Elections 
Mr. /Miss NSU Run off Elections 



Current Sauce, Page 6, September 14, 1982 





Beverly 
Armstrong 



Allison 
Arthur 



Canda ce 
Boyd 



Any student wishing to have his/her 
address and telephone number not 
printed in the Fall Semester 1982 
Student Telephone Directory must go 
by the office of the Director of Student 
Services (306 Student Union) by not 
later than September 24 and so in- 
form that office. 



COLLEGE 
REP WANTED 

To distribute "Student Rate" 
subscription cards on 
campus. Good income, no 
selling involved. For in- 
formation and application 
write to: CAMPUS SERVICE, 
1745 W. Glendale Ave., 
Phoenix, Az. 85021. 






Darlene 
Brown 



Linda 
Cooksey 





Cindy 
Duke 



Margaret 
Golson 





Deanna 
Grau 



Alicia 
Hay nes 



Lunch Special 

Monday thru Friday 
1 1 am till 1 :30 pm 
and 

Tuesday evening 5 pm to 9 pm 



! 2.39 



7" Single Ingredient Thin 
'N Crispy Pizza 
1 2 oz. Soft Drink Alitor 

Additional ingredients 
1 0* each 

Salad Bar s 1 .25 



117 Hwyl South 
357-8559 
CALL US 




September 14, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 7 




mmw 

Lisa 
Larrimer 





Laurie 
Weaver 





Marti 
Williamson 



Sundays at 5 p.m. KNWD 
will have Rolling Stones 
Magazine, a continuous 
history of Rock-n-Roll. 

Sundays at 7 p.m. they will 
7th Day. On 7th Day they will 
play 7 albums in their entirety. 

Tuesdays at 2 p.m. they will 
play 2 albums in the entirety. 

Two Van Halen tickets will 
be given away each day from 
Sept. 22-24 by KNWD. They 
will also be giving away free 
albums. 

Wednesday at 9 p.m. they 
will have Retro Rock. Retro 
Rock is a live recorded 
program. 





Kayla 
Murphy 



D w an da 
Smith 



Pauline 
Soileau 




liis ?»< 



Marcy 
Thrash 



PEOPLES BANK 

Student Checking Accounts 





If you're a full time high school, 
technical, or college student, you're 
eligible for a Peoples Bank Student 
Checking Account. 

The service charge is only $1.00 per 
month and there is no minimum balance 
requirement. 

Checks may be purchased 
at the regular price. 
Open your Peoples Bank 
Student Checking Account today 
at either location of Peoples Bank. 
Just another way 
Peoples Bank is helping you. 



PEOPLES 

PLUNK 

IB MM Wk MEMBER FDIC 

& TRUST CO NATCHITOCHES, LA. 



Each depositor insured to $100,000 



Current Sauce, Page 8, September 14, 1982 



Blue Key 



Larry Hall has been named 
to head tutoring for Blue Key 
Honor Fraternity. Hall's 
name was announced Wed- 
nesday Sept. 8 at Blue Key's 
first meeting of the fall 
semester. Persons desiring 
tutoring should contact 
Special Services or a Blue Key 
member. Special Services is 
located in Caldwell Hall on the 
second floor. 

The Blue Key blotter has 
been completed and will be 
distributed in the dorms soon. 

Blue Key nominated Cindy 
Duke, Deana Grau, and Marty 
Williamson to the 
Homecoming Court. Blue 
Key wishes these girls good 
luck. 

Blue Key will also assist with 
the Potpourri Editors banquet 
Friday September 25. 

Blue Key's new officers for 
1982-83 are: 
Lytt Allen-President 
Stan Powell-Vice-President 
Mike Vienne-Treasurer 
Jack Welch-Secretary 
Larry Hall-Director of 
Tutoring 

Thanks to Blue Key's new 
sweetheart Cindy Duke for the 
baked cookies at the meeting. 
Special thanks to Mrs. Fred 
Bosarge for the cupcakes also. 



Pan-Hellenic 



The Northwestern State 
University Pan-Hellenic 
Council is made up of the 
three black sororities on 
campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, 
Delta Sigma Theta, Zeta Phi 
Beta. 

The purpose of Pan- 
Hellenic is to promote unity 
and friendship among the 
black sororities. Serving the 
community is one of its main 
objectives. 

The officers for 1982-83 
Pan-Hellenic Council are: 
president-Ramona Murphy; 
vice-president-Tami Lilly; 
secretary-Gwendolyn Kimble; 
treasurer-Marion Johnson; 
parliamentarian-DeEtra Scott. 



PRSSA 



r 



Canoe 
Shed 
Hours 

Monday 3-4:30 
Tuesday 1-5:00 
Wednesday 3-4:30 
Thursday 1-5:00 



1 



"The Best Little 
Frame Shop in Natchitoches" 

Sincerely Yours 

Dixie Plaza Shopping Center 
(Next door to Connie's Hallmar'^op) 
352-1 699 9-5 Mon.-Sat. 4> 



^ 1 Year 

Anniversary 
save sale 

Sept. 14 thru 30 

at 

The Shoe Den 

Dixie Plaza Shopping Center 
357-9593 

15% OH 

all fall shoes from 

Candies, Connies, Shoes-n-Stuff, 
Footnotes, Naughty but Nice, and Town 
and Country. Select group of shoes only 
$ 10. 

Register for Prizes - 

$100 Gift Certificate, 35 mm camera, 
microwave or color TV, all expense paid 
vacation, or $5000 cash. 



NSU Chapter, Public 
elations Student Society of 
America, will meet Wed- 
nesday, September 15, 1982, 
in Room 23-1, Kyser Hall, at 
4:00 p.m. 

Public relations majors and 
students from all other majors 
are invited to attend. 
Membership is open to in- 
terested students and/Or those 
who will take or have taken a 
course in public relations. 

Faculty Adviser is Franklin 
Presson, Room 225-E, Kyser 
Hall, phone Ext. 5339. 

Health and PE 

The Health and Physical 
Education Department has 
announced that Special 
Examinations will be offered 
September 20, at 9:00 a.m. 
and 4:00 p.m. Before the tests 
are taken the proper forms 
must be filled out. The forms 
are available at the Registrar's 
Office. 



Toastmasters 

A new Toastmasters club is 
being at NSU. Both faculty 
and students are invited to join 
the organization. 

Toastmasters International 
is a non-profit group of 
Toastmasters clubs 
throughout the world. 

A Toastmasters club is an 
organized group, meeting 
regularly, which provides its 
members a professionally- 
designed program to improve 
their abilities in com- 
munication and to develop 
their leadership and executive 
potential. 

Members have -the op- 
portunity to deliver prepared 
speeches and impromptu 
talks, learn conference and 
committee leadership, un- 
derstand parlimentary 
procedure and then be 
evaluated by fellow Toast- 



Club Organized 

masters. 

A Toastmaster develops and 
improves leadership ability, 
methods of planning and 
conducting meetings, effective 
listening techniques, every 
aspect of oral communication 
methods, and other skills so 
necessary today. 

Toastmasters will met your 
needs for better com- 
munication in business 
meetings, community affairs, 
job inteviews, panel 
discussions and school 
courses. 



The first meeting is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. on 
Tuesday, September 21, in the 
Queen's Room in the Student 
Union Building. For more 
information about the local 
club please call Jack Graves in 
Leesville at 239-0308 collect. 



Listed below are the days 
and times organizations have 
been assigned to take their 
group pictures for the 1983 
POTPOURRI. Pictures will 
be taken in the Student Union 
Ballroom. Please have your 
club in the lobby of the Union 
20 minutes before your 
scheduled time. If there are 
any questions see me in room 
227 of Keyser or call 357-5026. 

Thank you, 
Janice Williams 
Organization Editor 
POTPOURRI 

SEPTEMBER 14, 1982 

GROUP 

6:30 Purple Jackets 

6:35 Blue Key 

6:40 Alpha Lambda Delta 

6:45 SLAE 

6:50 Geology Club 

6:55 BSU 

7:00 Psi Chi 

7:05 Phi Eta Sigma 

7:10 Phi Kappa Phi 

7:15 Alpha Beta Alpha 

7:20 Alpha Eta Rho 

7:25 Alpha Mu Gamma 

7:30 Alpha Psi Omega 

7:35 Beta Beta Beta 

7:40 Beta Gamma Psi 

7 :45 Iota Lambda Sigma 

7:50 Kappa Delta Pi 

7:55 Phi Alpha Theta 

8:00 Sigma Alpha Iota 

8:05 Sigma Delta Chi 

8:10 Sigma Delta Pi 

8:15 Society f or the Advancement 

of Management 

8:20 Student Personnel Association 

g : 25 University Players 

8:30 Church of Christ 

8:35 Chi Alpha 

8:40 Deseret Club 

8:45 Women's FCA 

8:50 FCS 

8-55 Holy Cross 

9.00 UMHE 

9:05 Delta Psi Kappa 

9:10 Pi Omega Pi 

9:20 Alpha Kappa Delta 

9:25 Air National Student Club 

9:30 Karate Club 

9:35 Penecostal Students 



SEPTEMBER 15, 1982 
GROUP 



TIME 

6:30 

6:35 

6:40 

6:45 

6:50 

6:55 

7:00 

7:05 
7:10 

7:15 
7:20 
7:25 
7:30 
7:35 
7:40 

7:45 
7:50 

8:00 
8:05 

8:10 

8:15 

8:20 

8:25 

8:30 

8:35 

8:45 
8:50 
8:55 

9:00 
9:05 
9:10 
9:15 
9:20 



Association for Student Artist 
Collegiate 4-H Club 
Chess Club 
Espit De Corps 
Cosmopolitan Club 
Equine Science Club 
Forestry and Wildlife Con- 
servation Club 
Industrial Education Club 
Institute of Electrial Elec- 
tronic Engineers 
Kappa Omicron Phi 
Micro-Biochem Club 
Split/Image 
Agriculture Club 
Alpha Angeles 

American Home Ec. 
Association 
Anthropology Club 
American Chemical Society 
Argus 

Wesley Foundation 
National Association of 
Collegiate Secretaries 
Omega Pearls 
Outings Club 
Periaktoi 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 

Psycology Club 

Public Relations Student 

Society of America 

Rodeo Team 

Sigma Sweets 

National Association for Kids 
Under Six 

Black Knights Drill Team 
Inter-Faternity Council 
KNWD 

MuAlpha Theta 
ADA 



Organizations 



September 14, 1982, Current Sauce. Pagev 



is 
or. 



Sig Tau 

"TAKING IT TO THE 
LIMIT" is the name of a new 
public relations plan being 
implemented by Sigma Tau 
Gamma. The plan approved 
by the fraternity sets increased 
goals for RUSH, campus 
involvement, and more 
community service projects as 
the three main goas of the 
fraternity. 

Sig Ti\i as added nine new 
pledges this fall: 

Ted Schouten, New Len- 
nox, 111.; Shannon Stracener, 
DeRidder; Carl Morgan, 
Keithville; Kevin Halborson, 
Moss Bluff; Paul Mitchell, 
Moss Bluff; Scott Fled, Los 
Angeles, California; Chris 
Coucet, Opelousas; Byron 
Carpenter, Sulphur; and Marc 
Bennett, Pollock. 

These nine new pledges 
bring Sigma Tau Gamma's 
membeship up from six last 
fall to 25 new members this 
fall. 

Sig Tau's new officers are 
Jeff Albrecht, president; Jack 
Welch III vice-president of 
membership; Jimmy Hartline, 
vice-president of management; 
Jeff Fonda, vice-president of 
records; Jim Hollier, vice- 
president of education; 
Donald Bihm, director of 
intramurals. 

Sig Tau would like to thank 
the following people who 
helped us with rush; Diane 
Jones, Jill Bordelon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Albrecht, our 
advisor Dr. Pippen, Mrs. 
Delphen and our other friends 
who space will not permit us to 
mention for helping us with 
out fall rush. Thanks. 

Cards Needed 

Camille Hawthorne, 
Coordinator of Organizations 
and Student Activities, 
requests the organiztional 
cards from every charter 
organization on campus which 
are due Oct. 1. If your 
organization did not receive a 
renewal card, check your 
sponsor or come by Student 
Union Room 214. 

Bienvenu to 
Present Workshop 

Dr. Millard Bienvenu will 
Present a workship on Sept. 21 
from - 4-6 p.m. in the Student 
Union Room 320, titled A 
Techniques in Leadership 
Effectiveness." The workshop 
I s designed for self- 
•mprovement for campus 
leaders. 

Interested students can sign 
"P in the Student Union, 
Room 214. For more in- 
formation call Dr. Bienvenu at 
357-6511. 



Sigma Kappa 

Delta Mu chapter of Sigma 
Kappa sorority announces 
their pledges for the Fall of 
1982. They are: Monica 
Aucoin, Rosemary Brent. 
Lola Boone, Shannon Conner, 
Celeste Covington, Ann 
Fleming, Brenda Foster, 
Debbie Gardner, Tammy 
Gremillion, Judi Humphries, 
Terri LeDoux, Marjoree 
Mike, Robin Miley, Tina 
Miquez, Noelle Orze, Gina 
Rousseau, Beth Sandiford, 
Kim Tollett, and Jodi Werfel. 
Congratulations to all these 
girls! 

Sigma Kappa had a bar-be- 
que at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Jim Johnson after rush 
week. All who attended had a 
great time. 

Thursday, September 2, the 
sorority had a Bring Your 
Own "B" party at the house. 
A week later, on September 9, 
a Chimney Chat and weiner 
roast was held on the hill. 

Sigma Kappa is looking 
forward to working with the 
other sororities and frater- 
nities here at NSU toward an 
exciting and productive 
semester. 



Wesley 



Hello Demons and welcome 
back to another semester. We 
would like to invite all of you 
to spend some time with us. 
Remember we have prayer 
breakfast every Tuesday 
morning at seven, supper at six 
on Wednesday evenings, and 
worship at six on Sunday 
evenings. Also, we are 
scheduleing a Homecoming 
dance for September 25th. 

The new officers for this 
year are as follows: president- 
Linda Stuchlik, vice-president- 
Sulvia del Carmen, secretary- 
treasurer-Connie Stuchlik, 
publicity chairman-Karen 
Veillon, historian-Melanie 
Daigle, worship leader- 
Jacquetta Navarre, and 
program director-Janice 
Williams. Congratulations 
and good luck to all! 



Kappa Alpha 

The Brother's of Kappa 
Alpha wish to welcome 
everyone back for the Fall 
semester, and we hope you 
enjoyed your summer. 

At the end of last semester 
we held our "Old South" Ball 
and as usual it was a huge 
success. For entertainment we 
had a very popular group from 
Baton Rouge named 
"Sneaux." We also elected a 
new Rose Court, and Rose. 
Our Rose is Mary Thrash. 
The court is as follows, Cindy 
Stracner, Shawn Sampite, and 
Kayla Murphy. We would like 
to cngratulate them over 
again, and thank them for the 
great job they did during rush. 

The Kappa Alpha's are also 
looking forward to a suc- 
cessful rush. And a properous 
semester botn for us and NSU. 

We would like to welcome 
Dr. Orze to NSU and we 
extend an open invitation to 
him and his family to feel free 
to visit us on the hill at 
anytime. 



SLAE 



Student Louisiana Association 
of Educators 

Are you interested in a 
professional organization for 
educcation majors? If you 
are, come and join us at the 
next Student La. Association 
of Educators meeting on 
September 7, at 6:00 p.m. in 
the lobby of the Teacher 
Education Center. 



SUGB 

The Student Union Governing 
Board will sponsor ten movies 
to be shown in Keyser 
Auditorium this semester. 

The movies include: The 
Rose on September 16 and 17, 
Southern Comfort on Sep- 
tember 23 and 24, Up In 
Smoke on September 31 and 
October 1, Watership Down 
on October 6, The Warriors 
on October 14 and 15, Prom 
Night on October 28 and 29, 
Star Wars, on November 4 
and 5, Arthur November 1 1 
and 12, Ordinary People, on 
November 18 and 19, and 
'Tribute' on December 2 and 
3. 

All these movies will start at 
7:30, with the exception of 
Watership Down, which will 
be announced at a later time. 



FCS 

Last Tuesday's meeting of 
FCS was a tremendous suc- 
cess. Stan Powell lead the 
meeting, starting off with the 
"Gorilla Cheer" for 
newcomers. After the fun and 
games, Stan talked about the 
five things God looks for in 
Christians. 

We hope every FCS meeting 
will be as successful as this one 
was and we extend a warm 
welcome to anyone interested 
in becoming a member. 

The next meeting will be 
picture taking time, so come 
ready to smile. We meet every 
Tuesday night in the Home 
Economics Building Living 
Room at 8:00. 



AKA 

Theta Chi Chapter of the 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 
held its annual Fall Rush on 
August 30,1982. This fall the 
theme was "An Ivies Dream 
and A Sorans Treasure." 

Scheduled events for future 
prospects included a dance 
September 2, 1982 Showcase, 
a social gathering and a dance 
September 9, 1982 at Jacko's. 

Monday, August 30-Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Social 
Tuesday, August 31 -Delta 
Sigma Theta Social 
Wednesday, September 1-Zeta 
Phi Beta Social 

Thursday, September 2-Movie 
Friday, September 3-Movie 
Saturday, September 4-NSU 
Demon Football 

A Sickle Cell drive which 
was held on September 1 1 
from 8 a.m. -4 p.m. started off 
as the first service project for 
Pan Hellenic. It was spon- 
sored in connection with the 
Riverside Chateau Guest 
Center. 

KE 

The Theta Mu Chapter of 
the Kappa Sigma Fraternity 
returns in full force after an 
excellant 1981-82 school year. 
The Sigs return as Intramural 
Champs for the eighth year in 
a row. 

We are very proud to 
anounce our officers for the 
following school year, they 
are: President Scott Sledge; 
Vice President Jack McCain, 
Master of Ceremonies Scott 
Repp; Treasurer Jeff "Too 
Tall" Lechman secretary Mike 
Monroy. The Guards are 
Kevin Detillier and Ashton 
Longlinais. Pledge Trainers 
are Jay Vail and Don Stacey. 

We are very proud to an- 
nounce out New Dream 
Court. These beautiful young 
ladies are: Dream Girl 
Connies Johnson, Dream 
Court Melanie Cam bell, Diane 
Boddie, Alison Arthur, 
Allison Breazeale, Mary 
Bittick. 

Best wishes goes to Brother 
Joe Stamey as he tackles on 
another term as S.G.A. 
President. 

We would also like to 
publish the names of the three 
young ladies who were 
nominated for the 
Homecoming Court . They are 
Alison Arthur, Laurie Weaver 
and Brenda Wynberg. 

We would also like to 
welcome back Alumni 
Brothers Randy Bonnette, 
Kurt Simpson, and Dennis 
McClung who, back to pursue 
their graduate studies. 

We welcome our young men 
into our Brotherhod. They are 
David Deville, Buzz Dranguet, 
Russell Bienvenu and Vincent 
Nicholson. 



Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta Chapter of 
the Delta Zeta Sorority held its 
first formal meeting of the fall 
Aug. 30, 1982. In this meeting 
several committee ap- 
pointments were made. 
Debbie Keene was elected first 
vice president in charge of 
pledge training. Janie Byrge 
was elected Scholarship 
chariman. Aleisha Williams 
was elected Standards 
chairman, and Christine 
Avant was elected Public 
Relations chairman. We are 
hoping to make this an ex- 
cellent year of us and all hope 
it will be for all here at N.S.U. 



Special Services 



Northwestern's Department 
of Special Services is the 
college program desgined to 
help you make it through 
those dog days of schooling. 
We proved the specialized help 
to meet your individual needs. 

If you are having trouble in 
class, we provide tutoring 
services which are absolutely 
free. We also offer help with 
Academic, Personal, 
Financial, and Career 
problems, as well as offering 
free counseling for the han- 
dicapped. 

Special Services also offers 
free counseling for Vocational 
Rehabilitation and Financial 
Assistance. So see, there's not 
alot we don't have to offer. 
Come see us now. We're in 
Room 201 Caldwell Hall and 
our phone number is 5425. 



Argus 



Susan Haga, the new editor 
of Argus, the NSU multi- 
media magazine, has an- 
nounced plans for the Fall 
1982 Contest. Two new 
categories are being added: 
Freshman essay and Freshman 
artwork. Entrants may be 
from the first or second class 
of a beginning course. Other 
categories are; Poetry, Short 
story, One-act play, Essay, 
Artwork, Black & White 
photography and the Argus 
cover. 

Guidelines and cover sheets 
are available from the Argus 
office in room 316-A, Third 
floor Kyser Hall. Winners will 
be published in the Argus and 
recognized at an awards 
ceremeony. All entries will be 
considered for publication in 
the Argus. The deadline for 
the Fall contest is November 
22, 1982. 



U- jii.i 1 1 i ii i i iiiiiii ii iiii 111 iiiiiiiiiiiii| i >i* w itil«IMii> i iii<iliilli>»iii>iiiiriiiiUiii n i ri n r rriirinn>HMnrr 



Current Sauce, Page 10, September 14, 1982 



Sports 



Demons Ease By Choctaws 



The Demons opened up 
their 1982 football season with 
a 24-20 comeback win over the 
Mississippi College Choctaws. 
In the win Northwestern did 
not look that impressive. 

Possibly the only bright 
spots for the Demons, if there 
were any, was shown by 
tailback Leroy Ellis, the 
receiving unit and the Demon 
defensive secondary. 

Northwestern rolled up 342 
total yards while Mississippi 
College had a total of 289 
yards. The Demon passing 
attack was again in tune, with 
quarterback Stan Powell 
throwing for 259 yards on 38 
attempts with 20 completions 
and no interceptions. Powell 
also threw touchdown passes 
of one yard and the game 
winner of 13 yards to Victor 
Oatis with only 59 seconds left 
in the contest. 

Dale Quickel was for 3 for 3 
in extra point conversions and 

1 for 3 on field goal attempts. 
Mississippi College 
placekicker Jim Turcotte was 

2 for 4 on field goal attempts. 

Johnson Named 
Track Coach 

Leon Johnson, has been 
named Northwestern State's 
new track coach for the up- 
coming track season. 

Johnson has been track and 
field coach at DeRidder High 
School since 1974. He guided 
the DeRidder track team to the 
state 3-A title this season and 
was named state Coach of the 
Year. While at DeRidder, 
Johnson twice coached cross 
country teams to second place 
finishes in the state meet 

From 1965 through 1974, 
Johnson coached at Opelousas 
High School. During that 
time, Opelousas finished as 
champion or runner-up in the 
Quad-A state championship 
from 1 970 to 1 974, and in 1 97 1 
and 1972 won the state titles. 

'We feel very fortunate to 
get a person that is familiar 
with our system,' said Nor- 
thwestern State Athletic 
Director A. L. Williams. 
'Leon is an enthusiastic person 
totally dedicated to athletics, 
we know he will do a very fine 
job for us.' 

At Northwestern Johnson 
will take over a track program 
that has placed in the top 20 in 
the nation at the Division I 
national championships each 
of the past two years, in- 
cluding an 11th place finish in 
1981 when the Demons 
claimed the national title in the 
400-meter relay. 



The Choctaws were lead 
offensively by running back 
Darrell Posey, who scored the 
only two Choctaw touch- 
downs. Posey also lead the 
Choctaws in rushing with 82 
yards and receiving with 51 
yards on 4 catches. 

Northwestern's defense 
looked good in spots, but 
lacked the consistency that 
the Demons need for a good 
season. David Grappe lead all 
tacklers with 10, while Red 
Richardsn had six tackles and 
one interception. The 
Choctaws did a good job 
holding NSU's number one 
receiver Victor Oatis to only 3 
catches for 53 yards and one 
touchdown. Victor's 
touchdown catch was the 
winning touchdown for the 



Demons. 

The touchdown was set up 
by a clutch fourth down catch 
by wide receiver Jerry 
Wheeler, who had 3 catches 
for 59 yards. Another clutch 
catch was made by underrated 
wide receiver Terry Jo Ramsey 
from Winnfield. Ramsey's 
catch came on a third down 
play to keep the Demon drive 
alive. 

Northwestern's Head Coach 
A. L. Williams was pleased to 
have the win under his belt, 
but he was not pleased with 
the overall play of the 
Demons. Northwestern must 
get better defensively and 
offensively moving the ball or 
this could be a long season for 
the out going Head Coach and 
all Demons fans. 



Thinclads Meet SLU 



The Northwestern cross 
country team, under new head 
Coach Leon Johnson, will 
open its 1982 season Friday 
afternoon at Southeastern 
Louisiana. 

The Demons have eight 
meets on the 1982 slate, in- 
cluding the Trans America 
conference championship, 
which will be hosted by 
Northwestern. The NSU 
squad will also host a high 
school meet to be run in 
Natchitoches on September 
25. 

After the opening meet at 
Southeastern the Demons will 
take part in the McNeese 
Invitational and the Louisiana 
Tech Invitational before 
hosting their first meet on 
Saturday, Oct. 2 when 
Centenary and Stephen F. 
Austin both visit. 

The Demons have finished 
second in the conference 
championships in each of the 
past two years and the 
champion in each of those 
years, Northeast Louisiana, is 
no longer a member of the 
league. 

Also for the first the 
Demons will run their home 
meets at the NSU recreation 
complex and will run a 
distance of 10,000 kilometers 
in all events except one. 

"The recreation course 
gives us a nice place to run and 
will be good for meets," noted 
Johnson. "It is pretty much 
wide open where spectators 
can view almost the entire 
race." 

As far as the schedule for 
this Fall, Johnson admits it is 
an ambitious one. "We do 
have a strong schedule," 
admitted Johnson. "Three or 
four of the meets will have 
outstanding competition. But 



Employment 
Help Wanted - Fall '82 

Special Services Needs English 
Math and Reading Tutors For The 
Fall 1982 Session. 
Contact: Special Services 
201 Caldwell Hall 
Call: 357-5435 

Employment 

******************* 



we are in those meets for the 
experience and the com- 
petition. We are aiming at the 
conference title and will work 
to reach our peak for the 
conference meet." 

There are two returning 
runners on the team from last 
Fall and the eight-man squad 
is composed of four freshmen, 
three sophomores and one 
junior. The returning runners 
are sophomore Andy Nelson 
and junior Brian Barrios. 

Demons Face 
SFA 

Northwestern's Demons 
will be on the road again this 
week after a disappointing29- 
16 loss to San Angelo State. 
Northwestern travels to play 
the Stephen F. Austin 
Lumberjacks. 

The Demons and Lum- 
berjacks will be playing for 
Chief Caddo. Stephen F. 
Austin should be hungry for a 
victory over the Demons, 
because they have not beat the 
Demons since 1975, that is a 
six year dry spell for the 
Lumberjacks. The Axemen 
are coming off a loss to 
Lamar, which could have 
easily been won, with a couple 
of good breaks. Northwestern 
is coming off a disappointing 
27-16 loss to San Angelo State. 

In the Demons loss the 
defense looked good, but the 
offense. is still sputtering. If 
the Demons are to win this 
week, they must have a good 
performance from all in- 
volved. For those students, 
that are not doing anything 
this weekend, why don't we all 
go over to Stephen F. Austin 
and support the Demons. 



Th © Nfc 

Sub-Machine * 

Sandwich Shop 

582 Front St. (Next to the Don Theatre) 

Orders to go 352-91 34 

Mon.-Thurs., 11-9 
Fri. and Sat. 11-12 pm 
Sun. 4-9 



Buy One Sandwich 
Receive a Second at 



1 /2 



price 



With this coupon. 

Must present coupon for puchase. 



Cane River 
Liquor 

Says 
Welcome Back 
NSU Students 

We Have All Your 
Party Needs 

•Liquor • Keg Beer 
•Wine •Frozen Drinks 

Cane River Mall 
(Next to Winn Dixie) 352-1 01 2 



This 

Week's 

Games 



SFA vs. NSU 



LSU vs. 
Oregon St. 



Tulane 
vs. Rice 



Notre Dame 
vs. Michigan 



Arkansas 
vs. Navy 



Arizona vs. 
Washington 



Ole Miss vs. 
Alabama 



Florida St. vs. 
Pittsburgh 



Auburn vs, 
Southern Miss 



Frostburg vs. 
Salisbury 



Season 
Record 




Roger 
Reynolds 



28-14 



LSU 
28-21 



Tulane 
21-14 



Notre Dame 
17-14 



Arkansas 
28-7 



Washington 
35-10 



Alabama 
38-14 



Pittsburg 
21-17 



USM 
28-14 



Frostburg 
14-10 



0-0 




John 
Cunningham 



NSU 
31-17 



LSU 
21-14 



Tulane 
17-10 



Michigan 
24-21 



Arkansas 
35-10 



Washington 
28-14 



Alabama 
31-10 



Pittsburg 
27-21 



USM 
21-17 



Salisbury 
7-6 



0-0 




Alison 
Breazeale 



NSU 
17-7 



LSU 
17-10 



Tulane 
24-10 



Michigan 
27-14 



Arkansas 
21-7 



Washington 
28-14 



Alabama 
35-14 



Fla. St. 
21-7 



USM 
35-10 



Frostburg 
42-24 



0-0 




Joe 
Cunningham 



NSU 
37-14 



LSU 
31-28 



Tulane 
31-0 



Notre Dame 
10-7 



Arkansas 
31-14 



Wahsington 
31-10 



Alabama 
67-0 



Pittsburg 
24-23 



Aubrun 
28-14 



Frostburg 
42-37 



0-0 




Augie 
McClendon 



NSU 
28-14 



LSU 
21-7 



Tulane 
35-7 



Michigan 
21-14 



Arkansas 
21-7 



Washington 
28-10 



Alabama 
28-7 



Pittsburg 
21-14 



USM 
24-7 



Salisbury 
3-2 



0-0 




NSU 
28-24 



LSU 
30-7 



Tulane 
21-20 



Michigan 
24-14 



Arkansas 
42-3 



Washington 
24-21 



Alabama 
35-20 



Pittsburgh 
21-0 



Auburn 
17-14 



Salisbury 
42-2 



0-0 




Buzz 
Dranguet 



NSU 
24-7 



LSU 
14-0 



Tulane 
36-24 



Notre Dame 
14-10 



Arkansas 
36-7 



Arizona 
17-7 



Alabama 
21-20 



Pittsburgh 
21-14 



USM 
7-6 



Salisbury 
14-10 



0-0 



Strike May Be 
Averted 



(Minneapolis)--NFL Co- 
mmissioner Pete Rozelle says 
he thinks there is a good 
chance a strike by the players 
can be averted. 

Rozelle believes owners 
have made some "solid 
movement" in their latest 
offer to the Player's 
Association. As Rozelle put 
it, "it demonstrates the 
sharing principal. It told the 
players they are entitled to 
more money." 

The commissioner, 
however, says he supports the 
owners' refusal to meet the 
Players Association demand 
for 55 percent of the team's 
gross revenue. And Rozelle 
says he'd like to see both sides 
cooperate to reach a fair 
settlement. 

NFL GLANCE 

Amertcon Conferenco 





W 


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pa 


Miomi 







1 


1 000 


IS 


71 


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1 








1 000 


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13 


Buffalo 


1 








1 000 


14 


♦ 


N Y Jell 





1 





000 


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45 


Baltimore 




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1 





000 


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1 








1 000 


77 


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1 ooo 


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1 





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Denver 










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East 












Washington 


1 


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1 000 


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1 000 


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000 


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West 


1 


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73 



P.P. Staff Undergoes Massive Redisorganization 



In one of the major news 
stories that took place over the 
summer while most of you 
were gone, the Current Sauce 
Porker Picker staff went 
through an almost total re- 
disorganization. 

Three regulars are gone off 
of last year's panel, and only 
one starter returns from a 
panel that hit a new high in all- 
time lows last year. For the 
first time in recent memory of 
the P.P. staff, a graduating 
senior of the P.P. staff ac- 
tually graduated with a grade 
point average. 

David Stamey, the Highman 
Trophy winner of two years 
ago was kicked out into the 
real world following a third 
Place finish last year. After 
almost an eternity laboring 
under the books at this in- 
stitution, Stamey finally got 
out when it was discovered 
that he had actually earned all 
°f his hours over three years 
ago. Unfortunately, faulty 
advising by then Sports Editor 
Bob Sjoberg, who had advised 
him that he still had 48 
semester hours left, had 
detained the former P.P. star. 



As for Sjoberg, he 
mysteriousy disappeared from 
town on a lonely, misty, and 
very cold night last February. 
He hasn't been heard from 
since, but frankly, no one 
cares. 

Dr. Ray Baumgardner, who 
became the first faculty 
selector in P.P. history to win 
the Highman Trophy (an- 
nually awarded for the overall 
best record in the regular 
season plus the bowl games) 
was given his uncondtional 
release by Sjoberg, just a week 
before he disappeared. 
Rumor has it that Bob is now a 
pickled specimen in the 
Biology department. 

The only returning member 
of the forum this year is Joe 
Cunningham. Why that is, is 
anybody's guess, but inside 
source's reveal that Cun- 
ningham is the only one with a 
master schedule of football 
games of various powers like 
Salisbury and Frostburg St. 

Joining Cunningham on the 
staff this year will be former 
Barnum and Bailey midget 
and most recently, the man 
who starred as E.T., Roger 



"Dodger" Reynolds. 
Reynolds' assumed the 
position of Sport's Editor this 
year almost by default when 
Sjoberg failed to show up this 
August. 

Taking over the second spot 
this year will be John Cun- 
ningham, (no relation to 
Roger Reynolds) who was a 
high school All-America for 
the Natchitoches-Central 
Chieftain newspaper football 
predictions staff. 

The fourth member of this 
year's staff, is Alison 
Breazeale. Alison is the only 
two time guest selector and she 
has compiled a remarkable 14- 
6 record. After her 8-2 week 
last year, the 21 year old 
blonde co-ed from Nat- 
chitoches demanded a regular 
spot on the P.P. staff. After a 
brief contract hassle, Alison 
was placed on the staff at a 
record salary level of $3.95 per 
week, making her the highest 
paid P.P. member in the 
history of organized 
predictons. 

Late last night, it was an- 
nounced that the three male 
members of the staff would 



stage a walkout at the end of 
the third week of the season if 
their contractual demands 
weren't met. Fred Garvey (no' 
relation to Ron Cey), acting as 
the legal council to the 
displeased triumvirate, stated 
that the prognosticators 
demaded at least 55 percent of 
the total gross of the P.P. 
staff's revenues. 

It was at this point that 
Perry Mason (no relation to 
Marcia Mason), stepped in 
and announced that the P.P. 
Panel was actually losing 
money, and this year, its 
members would probably have 
to pay that loss out of their 
own pockets. 

The three gentlemen 
members of the P.P. staff 
have temporarily called off 
their threatened walkout and 
have planned a car wash in- 
stead at the Discount Package 
Liquor and Spirits store on the 
strip. All proceeds will go 
directly to the P.P. Pension 
fund. 

In other P.P. news, this 
week, the first three guests of 
the new season have shown 
their manv talents to the P.P. 



Sundov's Gomes 
Oetroit 17. Chicago 10 
Cincinnati 77. Houston i 
Buffalo 14. Konsos Citv 9 
St Louis 31. New Orleans 7 
Minnesota 11. Tampa Bov 10 
Philadelphia 37. Washington J4. OT 
Green Bav 3S. Los Angeles Rams 73 
Atlanta 14, New York Giants 14 
New England 74. Boltimore 13 
Miami 45. New York Jets 7« 
Cleveland 31, Seattle 7 
San Diego 33. Denver 3 
Los Angeles Roiders 73, San f-roncisco 17 

Tonight's Schedule 
Pittsburgh ot Dongs. B p.m. 



staff. However, not a single 
one of those talents happened 
to be predicting football 
games. 

Augie McClendon, the man 
responsible for bringing us 
such renowned concerts as 
Hall and Oates and 
Christopher Cross, not to 
mention Texas Tradition 
(soon to be in the Rock Hall of 
Fame), showed that taste has 
nothing to do with football. 

Buzz Dranguet, (no relation 
to the Phi Mu Dranguets, 
according to him), joins Augie 
on the panel this week. Buzz is 
a two year member of Kappa 
Sigma soro-, I mean frater- 
nity. Oh well, into each life a 
little rain must fall. 

The third member of the 
guest panel is Lytton Allen (no 
relation to George Allen, Mel 
Allen, Dick Allen, Allen 
Allen, or Allan Parsons). Lytt 
is a distinguished and famous 
tennis star in his adopted 
hometown of Chilipepper, 
M e x i c o . . 



Current Sauce, Page 12, September 14, 1982 



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auce 



Vol, LXX No. 6 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




September 28, 1982 



Obstacles Nearly Overcome In Bike Path Plan 



Northwestern's Recreation 
Complex on the Highway 1 
Bypass may soon become 
more accessible to NSU 
students without automobiles 
who do not wish to walk or 
bicycle to the complex on the 
streets. 

During the past few months, 
the idea of a pathyway had 
been discussed by numerous 
students leaders but problems 
arose concerning the path's 
location which would pass 
through the NSU Agriculture 
Department's dairy pasture. 
The Agriculture Department 
had argued that students 
trekking through the pasture 
to the complex had already 
been seen bothering the 
livestock and allowing a 
bicycle path through the 
pasture would only endanger 
the students. 



SGA Senator-at-Large 
Perry Anderson organized a 
committee consisting of Dr. 
Jack Pace of NSU's 
Agriculture Department, Dean 
of Students Fred Bosarge, L 
Gene Knee ht - NSU C oor- 
dinator of Plant Maintenance 
Janice Duggan-Chariman of 
the SUGB's Research and 
Development Committee. The 
committee met several times 
and discussed the pathway. 

The Agriculture Depart- 
ment's ultimate proposal 
accepted by the committee 
called for a fence separating 
the Vi mile pathway from the 
pasture, gates linking these 
pastures for maintenance 
purposes, and cattle-gaps at 
either end of the pathway. 

A motion by Anderson was 
passed during the September 
13 meeting of the SGA. The 



motion stated that for in- 
creased student enjoyment of 
the Recreation Complex and 
for student safety, Nor- 
thwestern should allocate 
$3,000 towards the path's 



construction. The proposal 
also received favorable reviews 
by the Student Union 
Governing Board. 

According to Anderson, the 



cost of materials needed for 
the project - "posts, wire, 
gates, etc," -Labor costs are 
not included. 

The proposal will go to 



$3,000 pricetag includes the President Orze for approval. 




Local Bank Establishes 
NSU Scholarship Fund 




The Northwestern State 
University Foundation has 
received a $10,000 con- 
tribution from the Peoples 
Bank and Trust Company of 
Natchitoches to establish a 
scholarship fund that will 
benefit academicaly-talented 
high school students from 
Natchitoches Parish. 

Bill Cross, director of 
development and alumni 
affairs at Northwestern, said 
the interest the NSU Foun- 
dation will earn from investing 
the bank's contributions will 
be used to provide a $1,000 
scholarship for a Natchitoches 
Parish student to enroll at the 
university as a freshman. 

Cross said the Peoples Bank 
and Trust Company 
Scholarships will be given 
primarily to Natchitoches 
Parish students pursuing 
degrees in the College of 
Business. 

It may also be 
awarded to students in other 
areas of academic interest. 

He said scholarship ap- 
plications must be submitted 
by March 15 each year. A 
faculty committee from the 
College of Business at NSU 
will select the recipient, and a 



representative of People's 
Bank and Trust Company will 
present the scholarship to the 
student during the high 
school's spring com- 
mencement or academic 
awards programs. 

"Substantial outside 
support like the contribution 
we have received from the 
Peoples Bank and Trust 
Company of Natchitoches 
helps Northwestern maintain a 
margin of excellence in its 
academic programs," said 
Cross. 

He added, "This new 
scholarship fund will help 
attract quality high school 
resources to maintain its 
position of scholastic ex- 
cellence." 

Herzog Deblieux, chairman 
of the board of directors for 
the Peoples Bank and Trust 
Company, said the con- 
tribution represents an ex- 
tension of services the bank 
provides Northwestern and the 
people of Natchitoches Parish. 

"We established this 
scholarship fund," said 
DeBlieux," for the purpose of 
encouraging young Nat- 
chitoches Parish students to go 
to Northwestern and to work 
toward obtaining university 
degrees." 



And watch out for Sharks! Scattered debris, a few puddles and this sign are 
all that's on the pool floor of Nesom Natatorium which is currently being 
renovated. Photo by Allen M. Ford 

Office Of Development And Alumni 
Affairs Sponsors Trip To McNeese 



The Office of Development 
and Alumni Affairs at 
Northwestern is sponsoring a 
charter bus trip to Lake 
Charles on Saturday, Oct. 9, 
for the football game between 
the NSU Demons and the 
McNeese State University 
Cowboys. 

The cost of the tip is $34 per 
person, which includes bus 
transportation, dinner in 
Sulphur as the guest of Gen. 
and Mrs. Erbon Wise and a 
reserved seat ticket for the 
7:30 p.m. football game. 

Ray Carney, director events 
at Northwestern, said the 
charter bus will leave the 
parking lot of Prather 
Coliseum on the NSU campus 
at 1 p.m. and will return 
following the game. 

Reservations for the charter 
bus trip are being accepted on 
a first-come, first-served basis. 
All reservations must be made 
by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5. 
Checks are payable to the 
NSU Alumni Association. 



For reservations and other Development and Alumni 

information on the charter bus Affairs, Northwestern Stale 

trip, call (318) 357-4414 or University, Naichilochcs, La. 

write Ray Carney , Office of 71457. 

Ronnie Milsap to Appear 
At Christmas Festival 



A contract signed this 
summer will bring popular 
singing star Ronnie Milsap to 
Northwestern on December 4. 
The concert, sponsored by 
NSU's Student Union 
Governing Board will 
highlight Natchitoches's 
Annual Christmas Festival 



According to Robert 
Wilson, Director of the 
Student Union, 
are 

all the details 
should be finalized in the 

next couple ol weeks. 



ckel ■. 
not del mile as ol yel. 



Pamela Thompson, Stacy 
Ford Receives Scholarships 



Two Northwestern students 
majoring in home economics- 
related fields, have received 
scholarships through the NSU 



Foundation's Esther Cooley 
Memorial Scholarship F und. 
Pamela Dawn Thompson, 
Continued on Page 5 



Current Sauce, Page 2, September 28, 19X2 

Bossier Students NFL Strike May Cause Withdrawal Symptoms 

Sent Home 



The principal of Circenacrcs 
junior Migh school in Bossier 
Louisiana, ordered nearly 100 
.ludents to go home because 
they showed up at school 
wearing bizarre facial 
makeup, multicolored I air 
and punk rock clothes. 

Principal Oscar Killen sent 
the kids home because he did 
not realize their weird gelups 
were for a loot ball Pep Rally. 

Killen says it was "A mixup 
in communications" --- A 
teacher okayed the strange 
dress but didn't tell the 
principal... v ho sent the 
students home because they 
were dressed in a manner— 
"Not conducive to an 
educational environment." 

One to Be 
Inaugurated 
on November 5 



The inauguration of Dr. 
Joseph Otze as NSU's fif- 
teenth president will highlight 
the 1982-83 academic year. 
The inauguration has been 
scheduled for 10 a.m., Iriday, 
November 5, 1982. 

In commenting on the event 
Ms. Maxine Southerland, 
chairman of the Investiture 
Committee, said, "We have 
tried to involve all of the NSU 
people, and, of course, people 
from the community. The 
success of this important event 
depends on the participation 
of people from the town and 
the university." 

Ciuesi speakers at the 
inauration will include Dr. 
VYillim Junkins, Dr. William 
Arceneaux, Mr. Raymond 
Arthur, Dr. M a x i n e 
Southerland, Mr. Joseph 
Sumiey, Dr. Allen Ostar, and 
\li . Wiley Sharp. 

A large number of special 
events have been scheduled 
around the inauguration. A 
reception for NSU faculty will 
be held on Thursday evening 
from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the 
Vamado Drawing Room. 
Preceding the inauguration on 
I riday morning at 8 a.m. there 
will be a special mass for Dr. 
Orze and his family in the 
Immaculate Conception 
Church. 

family Day has been 
scheduled for Saturday, 
November 6, and Dr. Orz.e's 
Investiture will end with a 
football game on Saturday 
evening. A special art exhibit 
will run throughout the 
weekend. 

Although all of the events 
have been planned, some 
specific locations will be 
identified later. 



A psychologist says the 
more zealous pro football fans 
being forced to go "Cold 
Turkey" from their pigskin 
habit due to the strike by 
players in the national football 
leagure may show distinct 
withdrawal symptoms. 

Douglas Bernscin, associate 
head of the Depart men! of 
Psychology at the University of 
Illinois, says pro football 
addicts may suffer mild 
stress... and their spouses 
might find them difficul to 
live with. 

Bernstein says some fans 



may become slightly 
disoriented or irritated 
without their weekly diet of 
professional games. 



"everybody got along okay" 
during last year's baseball 
strike... and he predicts 



football fans will be just as 
sturdy as their baseball 
counterparts. 



The problem, he said, is the 
more that people are used to 
doing something in a regular 
way and the more they look 
forward to doing it, the more 
disturbing it may be to have 
that something taken away. 

But Bernstein says he's 
confident most pro football 
fans have the capacity to 
adapt. He observed that 



Whose Brains? 



Police in Champaign, 
Illinois, say they don't know 
who is the lawful owner of 22 
human brains found at a 
University of Illinois fraternity 
house. 

One fraternity member at 
the acacia house said he found 
them on top of clothes dryers 
in a ripped white plastic bag. 



Police detective Gary 
Wright says the brains, em- 
balmed in formaldehyde, were 
probably stolen from a 
cadaver room. He described 
"obviously we can't return 
these to their original owners 
but we are looking for the' 
rightful owners." 




This calculator thinks business. 
TheTI Student Business Analyst. 



It there's one thing undergrad 
business students have always 
needed, this is it: an affordable, 
business-oriented calculator. 
The Student Business Analyst. 
Its built-in business formulas 
let you perform complicated 
finance, accounting and 
statistical functions— the ones 
that usually require a lot of 
time and a stack of reference 
books, like present and future 
value calculations, amortiza- 
tions and balloon payments. 



It all means you spend less 
time calculating, and more 
time learning. One keystroke 
takes the place of manv. 
The calculator is just part 




of the package. You also get 
a book that follows most 
business courses: the Business 
Analyst Guidebook. Business 
professors helped us write it, 
to help you get the most out 
of calculator and classroom. 
A powerful combination. 

Think business. [""><- 
With the Student \JLC 
Business Analyst. 'vj 

Texas 
Instruments 



September 28, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 3 



Ms. Bebe - More Than A Secretary 



Paul Rath To Be Featured In 
Annual Outdoor Pops Concert 




"I'm a switchboard operator, 
a typist, and an information 
outlet. Then, of course, I'm 
also a secretary", says Bebe 
Adkins, secretary to Nor- 
thwestern's president, Dr. 
Joseph Orze. 



Ms. Adkins has been 
through two presidential 
transitions at NSU. Prior to 
becoming Dr. Orze's 
secretary, she worked under 
:he administration of former 
president Rene Bienvenu from 
1978 to 1982. "I worked with 
Dr. Bienvenu when he was 
Dean of the College of Science 
and Technology from 1969 
until 1978. Then I moved to 
the President's Office." 

She calls these transitions 
periods "very busy times. In a 
way, it's exciting. Change is 
always welcome - sometimes 
we need it. And with a twinkle 
in her eye, she admits that she 
"hopes there isn't another 
transition anytime soon." 

Acting as a sort of "buffer 
for the president", she 
"soothes angry nerves, steers 
phone calls, people, and pieces 
of paper that really should go 
somewhere else" to the proper 
places. "You have to know 



the structure so you can get it 
to the right places." 

"I get bawled out a lot," 
she adds. "It used to bother 
me, but now 1 find it 
amusing." Consistency and 
equal treatment to all, she 
claims, are her keys to a 
smoothly running office. 

And what does she consider 
the most enjoyable part of her 
occupation? "Oh, to watch 
good things happening - seeing 
the changes that bring them 
about." 



Natchitoches--The Nat- 
chitoches-Northwestern Sy- 
mphony Orchestra's 11th 
annual outdoor pops concert 
Tuesday, Oct. 5, on the NSU 
campus will feature Paul Rath 
of the university's vocal music 
faculty as piano soloist. 

Rath, who toured three 
years with the internationally- 
acclaimed Norman Luboff 
Choir as baritone solist before 
coming to NSU this fall, has 
played the piano for 20 years 
and has extensive experience 



Drama Department to Present Play 



"El Grande de Coca Cola" 
is a zany musical centering on 
a Honduran family who puts 
on shows to raise money. 
NSU actors will help evolve 
their own unique script based 
on their various talents and 
abilities. 



A 



ii 




Offer good 
till September 30th 



Featured productions for 
the spring semester arc 
"Who's Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf?" written by Edward 
Albee and directed by Ray 
Schexnaider and "Music 
Man". Who's Afraid of 
Virginia Woolf?" will run 
from March I4-I9 and "Music 
Man" will be presented April 
21-23. 



as an accompanist. 

He will be at the piano when 
the local orchestra, conducted 
by Dr. J. Robert Smith, 
performs selections from the 
Academy Award-winning 
movie, "Chariots of Fire." 
The film score by Vangelis 
also won an Academy Award 
this past year. 

"Chariots of Fire" is one of 
several major pictures and 
famous Broadway shows 
whose musical themes will be 
performed during the free 
outdoor pops concert. It 
begins at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Esplanade Theatre, the 
outdoor performance area at 
Northwestern's new A. A. 
Fredericks Center for the 
Creative and Performing Arts. 

Well-known ;unes by 
Gershwin and music from 
such hit movies as "Star 
Wars" are also included in the 
program. The public is 
requested to bring lawn chairs 
or blankets, because seating is 
not provided at the univer- 
sity's outdoor theatre. 



Collegiate Crossword 



ACROSS 37 Type of music 

38 Doesn't eat 
1 Movie mogul Marcus 39 The Sunflower State 
40 Part of APB, to 

pol ice 
1.1 All -too common t 

excuse (2 wds. ) 
43 Short opera solo 

47 Grotto 

48 Part of the hand 

50 Made do 

51 Prevents 

52 Alte 

53 U.S. caricaturist 



5 Heroic tale 
9 Song syllable 
12 The state of being 
undamaged 

15 Pal 

16 Its capital is 
Dacca 

17 Nobel chemist 

18 The art of putting 
on plays 



19 Pearson and Maddox 

21 Vegas 

22 Drink to excess 

23 Hiss 

26 I ta 1 ian pa i nter 

27 Screenwriter Anita 



54 farm storage place 



DOWN 



foe: 



sly 



28 Devilishly 

31 Decline 

32 Devices for 
refining flour 

33 Teachers organi- 
zation 

34 Shore protectors 
(2 wds. ) 

36 Machine part 



1 Conservatives' 
for short 

2 Go length 

(ramble) 

3 Famous volcano 

4 Moves jerk i ly 

5 Hollywood populace 

6 Sheriff Taylor 

7 "Golly" 

8 as an eel 

9 Size of some 
want-ads (2 wds . ) 



10 Regretful one 

11 Vanderbilt and 
Lowel 1 

13 Acquit 

14 "The Lord is My 

15 Veal 

20 Extends across 

22 Turkic tribesmen 

23 Mr. Guinness 

24 Spanish for wolf 

25 Retrace (3 wds. ) 

26 Disproof 
28 Ends, as a 

broadcast ( 2 wds . ) 
VI Like r*l fx Unger 
30 Head inventory 
32 Hurt or cheated 
,35 Glided 
36 Lead minera 1 s 
38 Coquette 

40 Take (pause) 

41 finished a cake 

42 footbal 1 trick 

43 "Rock of " 

44 AnHehones 

45 Work wi th soi I 

46 Too 

49 New Deal urqani- 
/at ion 



1 


2 


3 




■ 


5 


6 


7 


8 




5 


10 


11 


12 








13 










14 












IS 




















1 










12 














H 














m 




■ 22 






















■ 














27 






_. 




28 
















29 


30 


31 




























34 






35 








































. * 












1 


1 


39 














mm 


























4 J 




47 










48 




49 


























51 




















5£ 








53" 








■ 


M 









© l.dwurd In 1 ins 



Co I 1 en ! .it ■• f"'A" 



Opinion 

The Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the 
author's. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
University, its administration, the students or even the rest of 
the Current Sauce staff. The Current Sauce invites letters to the 
editor, which must be signed, as well as guest editorials, which 
must also be signed. Address all correspondence to Current 
Sauce, Room 225 Keyser Hall. 

Current Sauce, Page 4, September 28, 1982 



The Mob Is Losing Its Class 



Dear litlitor: 

1 was, somewhat surprised 
to sec in lasi weeks paper a 
picture of "Ncpiunc." I do 
believe Hull the photographer 
should have substituted :i 



Letter 



picture ofUrajius instead. 

Eric, B. Ma ron 
l'.S. As to whether or not 
(here are rings arqund.tjratnts 
is none of my business. 



Kdilor 
.loc ( 'iinninghiihi Jr. 

( 'it-News I dilor 
Hjirhi Hull 

C o-l oi lis I dilor 
Itciilrke Duhnoii 

Asst. News I dilor 
Susan Arthur 

M:ill Reporter 
Msirvsi Mitxev 



Advertising Manager 
Mison Brra/ealv 

( o-\e»s I .dilor 
Lisa \V i Hi. i in- 

Sporls Kdilor 
Koyer Re> nolds 

Asst. News I- dilor 
INanna (.ration 

Athisor 
I- rank I'rosson 



Business Manager 
David Saviors 

(o-Kouis Kdilor 
I'al Skidmore 

Assl. Sporls Kdilor 
John Oinninnham 

Assl. Koins Kdilor 
I esa HalU'v 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce it the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Pom Officer under the act of 
March \. 1179 

Current Sauce ts published every Tuesday 
morning in the tall and spring semester with 
(he exception of holidavs and testing periods, 
and biweekly during the summer cession. It is 
printed at ihe Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South. Natchitoches. Louisiana 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224, Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357 54 $6 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearl), 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSL . Natchitoches. Louisiana 71457 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily lepreseni the viewpoint of the 
admmisiration. taculiv. staff, or student bodv 
ot Northwestern 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student bods of Northwestern 
I etters must be -igned and be no more than 
SO0 words to be considered for publication 
They mav be on anv subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous 

Current Saus'e reverses the right to edit (he 
letter tor journalistic style and available space 

Send postal form number 35 7 9 to Current 
Sauce. NSL'. Naichuoches. I ouisiana. 7145''. 




Picking The Right One 

Once again, wc here at good ole NSU are blessed with election 
lime. It seems that just about every time you look around, there's 
another election: 

This time it's for class Senators lor the SGA. Now there's 
nothing new about voting lor class senators. It's been done for a 
long time. But whoever first thought it up must have been ahead 
of his time. 

Through the years here at Northwestern, our Senate has un- 
dertaken that same responsibility, albeit, sometimes not suc- 
cessfully, but generally very well. 

I personally think that in the last three years, (that's as long as 
I've been at NSU) (hat the SGA has made great strides forward. 
Now, it's time for a fresh infuse of new meat to get in and try to 
make NSU the place for you. 

I constantly wonder though, if our candidates are running for 
the SCiA because of a genuine concern for their fellow man, and 
NSU, or lor their resumes. Sometimes it's hard to toll, sometimes 
it's easy to tell. Sonic! lines of course, it \s both. 

Now, for the cynics and paranoids, I don't have anyone 
specifically in mind when I say that, it's just that sometimes you 
wonder. 

When you vote tomorrow, and please do vote, take into 
consideration who you think will work lor you. Take into 
consideration the person's experience, espcially if he or she has 
worked in the Senate before. You have your favorites and I have 
mine, I wish that I could tell you who to vote for, but it would be 
a little unethical in a small college newspaper. 

Hut please, look for the people with experience, the people that 
you know are going to go out and bust their hiney's for your sake 
and mine. We desperately need some more people like that in the 
SGA. We already have some real good hard working Senators, 
we iiist need a lew more. 



John Hess is a syndicted 
columnist of the United 
Feature Syndicate 

Dear Godfather: 

Wherever you are, you 
ought to know that you are 
missed. La Cosa Nostra is in 
terrible shape. 

I don't mean all these 
shootings; you were used to 
that. And I don't mean that 
the money is running low; 
between Atlantic City and Las 
Vegas and coke and the legit 
businesses, the cash flow has 
never been bigger. 

What I mean is the loss of 
class. 

All of us who have seen the 
movies think of your 
organization as an aristocracy 
of crime: grand estates, big 
limos, flashy women, fine 
clothes, kids in Ivy League 
colleges, a code of blood 
brotherhood - that sort of 
thing. 

And what are we hearing 
now? FBI wiretaps of a lot of 
goons who can hardly talk 
straight, and are always 



ratting on one another or 
rubbing one another out over 
some sleazy swindle. 

You would have been 
humiliated to hear the lawyer 
for a thug described as your 
heir to the New York-New 
Jersey organization. This was 
at the trial for murder and 
dope-dealing of five 
Bonannos, rivals to the 
Colombo family. 

"This case is demeaning," 
the lawyer told the jury. "...It 
is even demeaning to the 
Colombo family to her that 
Bootsie, Benny, Nicky, Boots 
and Fish are the Bonanno 
family. Five little fishies. 

"If Marlon Brando had 
known that these five people 
were supposed to be the 
Bonanno family, he never 
would have accepted the title 
role. Take my word." 

The jury did not buy that, 
but it's perfectly true. A 
sleazier bunch of hoods you 
never did see. 

You may take some comfort 
to know that some of the 
members have indirectly been 
involved with the White 
House. That is, they con- 
tributed to the Reagan 
campaign fund that Ray 
Donovan was collecting from 
guys in the construction game. 

He did so well that he was 
named Secretary of Labor, 
can you beat it? Still, the 
glamour went out of that when 
a lot of people said he'd hung 
out with members of your old 
organization. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Editor, 

In reply to the article on 
'Why the Hypocrisy ?" I'd like 
to say this: 

1 don't think the Federal 
Government is making an 
issue out of being black, they 
are merely trying to open up 
more jobs for the minorities. 

What's so stupid about the 
title of Vicki's job? Recruiting 
"other race" stud-nts is an 
important position and what a 
better way to get minorities 
here than to have another 
minority speaking about 
NSU's good points. 

1 wasn't aware that Vicki's 
job allowed her to hire people. 
If it does, I think that Vicki is 
intelligent enough to hire the 
most qualified person for the 
job whatever their color. 

Unemployment is high for 
everyone not just minorities. 
If the government is making 
more jobs available to 
minorities I think that's great. 

I don't think the govern- 
ment is insulting Vicki's in- 
telligence because she got this 
job. In order to get a position 
such as recruiting minorities to 
NSU one would have to be 
intelligent enough to find new 
creatvie ways to get the 
students here. 



If people, no matter what 
race, take pride in what they 
do and enjoy their work the 
title of their job is unim- 
portant. 

Jacqueline Calandro 

(Editor's Note) Apparently 
you misunderstood the point 
of the editorial. The point is 
that the Federal Government 
has been trying to preach 
racial equality (which they 
should do) for such a long 
time, that it now seems like a 
step backwards when they tell 
V icki that she can only recruit 
non-white students, and the 
white students will be recruited 
by white people. If all people 
are the same regardless of 
race, color, or religion, then 
let's start acting like it. 

Vicki is a good recruiter. 
She deserves a job with High 
School Relations. The only 
point I was trying to make, is 
that the government on the 
one hand busses kids an extra 
25 miles out of their way for 
racial equality and at the 
same time, they give a black 
person a job and tell them just 
to recruit black people and 
other minorities and leave the 
recruiting of white kids to the 
white people. That my dear, is 
the hy procrisy. 



They had to name a special 
prosecutor, Leon Silverman. I 
watched him give his "final 
report" - he hoped - in his 
fancy Wall Street offices, and 
you never saw a more 
disillusioned man. 

He said he found some 
evidence of crime and "a 
disturbing number" of 
allegations, but "insufficient 
credible evidence" to indict 
Donovan. That was enough 
for Reagan to say, "You bet, 
that case is closed." 

But the reluctan: Silverman 
soon had to reopen the case, 
on new evidence. His mood 
could not have been improved 
when a second witness was 
bumped off. 

The first one had been this 
dumb hood who had 
volunteered to take a lie 
detector test, and flunked 
when he said he didn't know 
Donovan. The second was a 
guy who was mentioned in the 
Silverman report as having 
collaboraged with the FBI. 

Silverman closed the in- 
vestigation again, before there 
was any further bloodshed. 

The funny thing is that the 
two murders may have had 
nothing to do with the 
Donovan investigation. But as 
you know, Don Corleone, if 
you lie down with dogs, you 
get up with fleas. 

This might be a good moral 
for the White House. Still, if 
they barred anybody from any 
industry that had a link to 
crime, who could they hire? 
According to U.S. News and 
World Report, nobody from 
the top corporations. 

That's their problem. 
Yours is that these goings-on 
are giving organized crime a 
bad name. Next thing you 
know, people will begin to 
believe that those writers made 
it all up - that La Cosa Nostra 
is a bunch of rotten hoods 
with no class. 

As that lawyer said, this is 
demeaning. 

Respectfully yours, 
John L. Hess 



Opinion Poll 



In an effort to better serve the 
needs of Northwestern students, 
the SUGB asks that you please 
participate in this opinion poll 

Would you be willing to pay a 
few dollars extra with your NSU 
ID to purchase tickets for a 
bigger name concert here on 
campus? 

This is only an opinion poll- not 
a vote However future actions 
by the SUGB can be affected by 
your participation 

Please drop this by SUGB 
office, or in Iberville in a specially 
marked box or in a box in the 
Student Union 



Yes 



No 



SGA Class Senator Nominees 




Michael Prudhomme 

With the arrival of Dr. Orze 
as president of NSU, I see a 
new role for student govern- 
ment -- a much more active 
and responsible position of 
truly being a representative of 
the student population. I have 
entered this race with a desire 
to be a true representative 
having a voice in student 
affairs. Too long has our SGA 
been an idol status symbol and 
in the end accomplishing little. 
Look at the time spent talking 
in previous years about 
Chaplin Lake when I believe 
there were much more serious 
problems confronting us as a 
student body, such as how 
student funds and university 
monies have been used to 
support various programs. As 
the out-going president of my 
fraternity, 1 believe that I have 
both the time and experience 
to put forth an effective effort 
to reflect the opinions and 
needs of our campus. 1 would 
appreciate your vote of 
confidence for junior senator 
at election time. Michael 
Prudhomme 

Scholarships 

Continued from Page 1 

an early childhood education 
major from Coushatta, was 
awarded the $400 Esther 
Cooley Freshman Scholarship, 
and the $200 Esther Cooley 
Sophomore Scholarship has 
been presented to vocational 
home economics education 
major Stacy Shaw Ford of 
Natchitoches. 

The scholarship fund was 
established by alumni and 
friends in memory of Miss 
Cooley. She served as head of 
Northwestern's Home 
Economics Department from 
1926 to 1949, when she 
became a specialist in con- 
sumer education for the 
Louisiana Agriculutral Ex- 
tension Service at Louisiana 
State University. 



RESEARCH PAPERS 



Improve your grades' Rush $1 00 for the 
current, 306 page, research catalog 11.278 
papers on file, all academic subjects 
Research Assistance 11322 Idaho Aw. . 
»206W. Los Angeles. CA 90025 (213) 
477-8226 



ll 

Don Stacy 



Hi! My name is Don Stacy. 
I am a senior and have at- 
tended NSU for the past three 
years. I am running for the 
office of senior class senator 
and would appreciate your 
vote. 

While at NSU I have held 
the position of freshman class 
senator, junior class senator, 
member of the election 
committee and am currently 
chairman of the Distinguished 
Lectures Committee. Please 
vote for me this Wednesday; if 
elected, I will serve you to the 
best of my ability. Don Stacy 



The Theta Chi Pledge Class 

Will sponsor a 50 c draft party at the 
Home Plate (Keg) on Thursday, 
September 30. There will be music 
provided by a deejay. The party will 
start at 8:00 and go until whenever. 
Admission is $ 1 at the door. 



Win A 
Honda Express II 

Kappa Sigma will raffle off one Oct. 1 6 
at the NSU - Alcorn St. game. Get 
your ticket from any Kappa Sigma 
member. 



RIVER 



LIQUOR) 

Your Party Supply 
Headquarters 

•Wines •KegBeer 
•Liquors •Frozen Drinks 

Special This Week: 

Coors Light 

2.75 6-pak 10.75 case 



Attention Students 



Below are the new standards 
for "good standing and 
satisfactory progress" ef- 
fective Fall 1982 for continued 
receipt of financial assistance 
at NSU. 

A student must have an 
overall 2.00 GPA in the four 
major subjects (English, 
Math, Social Science, and 
Social Studies) in order to be 
in "Good Academic Stan- 
ding" to qualify for financial 
assistance as a Freshman. To 
continue receiving financial 
assistance a student must 
make satisfactory academic 
progress. This calls for a 
student to maintain a 1 .5 CPA 
the first year in college. The 
second year a student must 
maintain a 1.75 GPA. After 
the second year the student 
must maintain a 2.00 GPA to 
continue receiving financial 
assistance. If a student fails to 
maintain the required GPA (in 



order to continue receiving 
financial assistance), he or she 
will not receive financial 
assistance for the following 
semester. The student must 
make a 2.00 GPA and enroll in 
the same number of hour- as 
the previous semestei in order 
to make satisfactory progress 
and receive financial 
assistance the following 
semester. 
Transfer Students 

Transfer students are 
requited to comply with the 
a bo ve si a n d a r d s o f 
satisfactory progress in order 
lo receive financial assistance 
at NSU. 

Time Limits on Financial Aid 
Eligibility 

A student may receive 
financial aid for a maximum 
of five years (10 semester) in 
order to complete a four year 
degree program. 



¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



Cane River Mall 
(Next to Winn Dixie) 



352-1012 



* 



Where Something Special Happens +c 



Eve 



Night 

ck Nite 

$1.00 




free 



^ou can 
Cox & 



cortec or 



* 

Starting soon the Great * 
Pretender Contest. * 

Hwy. 1 South 352-4793 £ 

******************* 



crinX^lOO. 
Blue BHyou. 
Thurs. -Lacies Nite 1 
All lacies whether 

unesclprtec acmitteft free with 
1st chink free. Ronnie Cox & 

Blue ^^DUr^~^ f" x 

Fri.- SathTh4re'$ always a 

party orMhd whekencs with 

super bamid j 

Playing khisl &m. from Baton 

Rouge the group, "Shine". 



Current Sauce, Page 6, September 28. 1982 

1982 SGA Class Senator Nominees 







Judith Covington 

I, Judith Covington, a 
freshman microbiology major, 
am running for freshman 
senator. I've lived m Nat- 
chitoches for sixteen years and 
have had the chance to set 
Northwestern grow;. I havt 
really enjoyed this and wouk 
like to take part in the future 
growth of Northwestern. I've 
previously served on a student 
council and other councils in 
different organi/alions and 
held offices in these. I really 
enjoy meeting new people and 
will make myself available to 
talk to anyone about the 
activities of the SGA. I would 
really appreciate your vote 
and, if elected, I will do my 
best for you. Judith 
Covington 



Lynn Nicolle 

Hello, I'm Lynn Nicolle. I 
would like to take just a small 
segment of your time to ex- 
plain my qualifications and 
reasons for running for 
Freshman Senator. 

I graduated from the Baton 
Rouge Magnet High School. I 
participated in the Presidential 
Classroom in Washington, 
D.C. I was a member of the 
198 1 -82 State Champion Cross 
Country and Track team, an 
was the slide show Committee 
Chairman. 

1 feel that I have a soiid 
foundation with dealing with 
people. NSU will continue to 
grow with the support of the 
students. I would like to 
personally know the students 
and the only way is to become 
involved. Lynn Nicolle 



Dean Napoli 

This is a short message 
concerning the upcoming 
S.G.A. election. I am running 
for the office of senior 
senator, a position of which I 
think I posess the experience 
to hold. I have put forth a 
great deal of effort in the past 
year for the students. I was 
very much involved in the 
discussion and passage of 
several bills, including the cost 
of parking fines. 1 feel that 
alot was accomplished in the 
past year in S.G.A. and would 
like to continue working in 
this organization. Dean R. 
Napoli 



Todd Eppler 

1 want to be the Freshman 
Class S.G.A. Senator becaus I 
feel I am the best candidate for 
the position. I have experience 
in leadership, I enjoy working 
in and learning about 
government. These are a few 
of the reasons I feel I can do 
the best job for the Freshman 
Class. If you elect me 
Freshman S.G.A. Senator, I 
promise to represent you to 
the best of my ability and to 
always have an open mind to 
your suggestions for the 
betterment of NSU. I would 
greatly appreciate your vote. 
Thank you. Todd Eppler 



ATTENTION 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Renewal Cards are DUE October 
1982 in Student Union Room 214. 
not turned in Organizations will 



1, 
If 

be 



considered inactive and 
Organizational rights. 



lose all NSU 



Lunch Special 

Monday thru Friday 
1 1 am till 1 :30 prn 
and 

Tuesday evening 5 prn to 9 pm 



7" Single Ingredient Thin 

'N Crispy Pizza 

1 2 oz. Soft Drink A " f °r 



$ 2.39 




Additional ingredients 
1 C each 

Salad Bar s 1 .25 



Julia's 
is Back! 

Daily Luncheon Special 
1 1 :00-3:00 

FINE MEXICAN 

AND AMERICAN FOOD 

1 /2 mile past Hickory Village 
on Hwy. 6 West 
11-9 Tues.-Thurs. 
11-10 Fri.& Sat. 
357-1446 

KNVVI) PROGRAMMING 



117 Hwy 1 South 
357-8559 
CALL US 



Wednesday 9/29- 6:0<)p 
Sundries - Hosted by Neil 
Cameron and Bill Roberts 
Talk program with Listener 
Phone Calls. 

9:00p Retro Rock - With 
Jimi Hendrix and Johnny 
J W inter recorded li\e. 

1 1 :00p - Concert Dream - 
one hour of the pretenders. 
Thursday 9/30 - Regular 
sic programming 
day 10/1 - Regular music- 
programming 
Saturday 10/2 - S:00p - BBC 
i^Rock Hour with he Flock of 
[•Seagulls recorded live. 

Sunday 10/3 - l:00p - 



! Tin 
» music 



Contempory Christian music 
program 

3:00p - The Jazz con- 
nection. 

6:00p - The rolling stone 
magazine continous history of 
rock and roll with The 
Cireatest Rock Festivals 

7:00p - Seventh Day - Seven 
albums played in their en- 
tirety . 

Monday - 10/4 - 9:00p - 
Concert Dream - One hour of 
Foreigner 

ll:00p - International music 
program 

Tuesday 10/5 - Two in a 
row all dav. 




Mark Thigpen 

1, Mark Thigpen, would like 
to announce my candidacy for 
SGA Senior Class Senator. I 
am a 1979 graduate of 
Mansfield High School and 
presently majoring in Physical 
Education. 

Elect me your Senior Class 
Senator and I will make it my 
duty to find out how you, the 
senior students, feel about 
certain issues. In order to 
make your time at NSU a 
more enjoyable one, I will also 
work with the other senators 
toward solutions to the 
problems facing not only the 
seniors, but the entire student 
body. 

If you want somebody 
different with a new opinion, 
willing to work, and not afraid 
to speak out for what he 
believes, then use your vote to 
help me help you. Your 
support will be greatly ap- 




Noelle Orze 



My name is Noelle Orze and 
I am recent resident of Nat- 
chitoches, previously living in 
Worcester, Massachusetts. I 
have found that the students 
here at Northwestern are very 
enthusiastic about their 
university. It makes me feel 
very proud to be a part of a 
school that has so much going 
for it. If elected freshman 
:lass senator, I will help to 
sromote Northwestern State 
University as a growing and 
prosperous university for 
incoming freshmen by 
representing my freshman 
class on the Student Govern- 
ment Association. Noelle 
Orze 



September 28, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 7 

1982 SGA Class Senator Nominees 




\ iq 

Susan Johnson 

My name is Susan Johnson 
and I would like to announce 
my candidacy for the office of 
Junior Class Senator. I 
consider myslf to be a diligent 
worker and I possess a great 
interest in the many facets of 
campus life and business here 
at Northwestern. I would like 
the chance to represent the 
students here through the 
Student Government and 
would appreciate your vote of 
confidence in the upcoming 
election. Susan Johnson 




John Norrid 

i, John Norrid, would like 
to announce my candidacy for 
the office of Freshman Class 
Senator. 1 feel that this office 
is very important in that I will 
be expected to rpresent my 
class and serve their needs. I 
can promise you that I will do 
my best in maintaining the 
office to which I hope to be 
elected. Please consider me as 
your vote will be appreciated. 
Thanks! John Norrid 




Alyson Rein 

My name is Alyson Rein 
and I am running for S.G.A. 
Sophomore Senator. In the 
past, 1 have served in several 
leadership positions which I 
feel will help me if elected. 1 
am very interested in NSU and 
1 will do my best to com- 
municate with you and help 
you with any problems you 
may have. Your vote will be 
appreciated. Alyson Rein 




Robert Haynes 

Hi! Jim Robert Haynes, and 
I am running for freshman 
class senator. I have a lot of 
new ideas 1 would like to put 
in good use and 1 think being 
in the SGA is the best way to 
express them. I have the ex- 
perience to be your freshman 
senator and know how to 
express your opinions for you. 
When you go to vote, think of 
me, someone who will take 
your problems and opinions to 
the top for you. Jim Robert 
Haynes 



Dudley Hall 

I, Dudley Hall, am seeking 
'he office of junior class 
senator, for the primary 
reason to further uphold the 
slogan "SGA: Students 
Making Things Happen". On 
first coming to Northwestern, 
I always had the desire to 
become a part of the mediator 
between the students and the 
a dministration, otherwise 
known as the SGA. My past 
Position as president of the 
business club, the Society for 
'he Advancement of 
Management, I feel will 
benefit me greatly in the area 
°f representing the junior 
c| ass. JUNIORS, I am ready 
10 meet this challenge and 
Waiting to become 
"NOBODY'S MAN BUT 
YOURS". DudlevHall 




Kimberlee Brent 

Have you ever been in a crowd 
of people with everyone trying 
to talk at once Maybe they're 
all saying the same thing, but 
noone can be understood. One 
voice, representing a group 
can speak much more ef- 
fectively. 

The Student Government 
Association -- the link between 
student body and ad- 
ministration - was created to 
govern and serve the students 
of Northwestern. Without 
student input SGA is useless. 
They want to hear your 
opinions and ideas. They want 
to hear your voice. 

I'd like to be the voice for 
the sophomore class. I think 
student government is im- 
portant and I am willing, if 
elected, to put everything I can 
into representing my class 
well. Kimeberlee Brent 




Lesa Hatley 

I want to define and help 
solve problems which face 
OUR freshman class. If 
elected I will use the advice of 
professionals at NSU to 
develop a questionnaire to 
find out what you, the NSU 
freshmen, think about food 
service, classroom instruction, 
recreational opportunities, 
registration procedures and 
the many other issues which 
affect our lives here. After 
finding out what you think, I 
will publish the results of the 
survey and communicate your 
wishes clearly and forcefully 
to the SGA, the faculty senate, 
and the administration. Let's 
make our four years at 
Northwestern happy and 
valuable. Lesa Hatley 



Susanne Crawford 

Hi! 1 am Susanne 
Crawford, a candidate for 
senior class senator. I am a 
broadcast journalism major 
and have previously served as 
Senator-at-Large. I have 
served on a number of SGA 
committees, including Student 
Services, State Fair, 
Homecoming, Spirit and 
Library. In my years at NSU, I 
have been interested in 
satisfying the needs and 
desires of the students in 
making NSU a better place to 
live and learn. I believe my 
experience in SGA has shown 
me how to best represent the 
students' needs. So when you 
vole, remember Susanne 
Crawford for senior class 
senator. Susanne ( "raw ford 



Vote 



Wednesday 




Donna Jo Kelly 

Running for sophomore 
senator means a great deal to 
me because 1 want to represent 
my class in the SGA. 

The one year I have spent al 
NSU has acquainted me with a 
great many people. With the 
your help, I feel we 
(sophomores) can have a 
strong voice in government. 
Having served as officer in 
various clubs in high school, I 
believe I have the adequate 
experience. I will be a senator 
lo work with and lor my 
sophomore class. 

When and IF 1 am elected 1 
will do my best to serve you. 
Donna Jo Kelly 




V *1 
\ I 

Christine Avaiit 

I, Christine Avanl, a 
sophomore in Lnglish 
Lducation, am running lor 
sophomore class senator. I 
feel my qualifications are 
twofold. First, I have the time 
lo devote to SGA since I've 
attended every meeting except 
one for (his last year as 
committee member and 
chairperson. Second, since 
familiar with Parliamentary 
Procedure, I will be able to 
concuct myself properly 
within the meetings with 
confidence and pride in my 
class and school. Other 
organizations offices I hold 
include SLAE - historian, 
Delta Zeta Sorority - house 
chairman, Panhelienic 
Delegate and Public Relations 
Chairman, Panhelienic 
Publicity Chairman and (he 
Argus Publicity Editorship. 



Current Sauce, Page 8, September 28, 1982 

PRSSA 



Organizations 



The NSU Chapter of Public 
Relations Student Society of 
America invites all majors to a 
meeting that will be held 
Thurs. Sept. 30 1982, in room 
213, Kyscr Hall at 6:00 p.m. 
Membership in PRSSA offers 
you the opportunity to meet 
potential, future employers. 
Through our varied activities 
and internship program, you 
arc introduced to the working 
world by top-notch 
professionals who can help you 
decide and select the type of 
business environment in which 
you want to work—the type of 
job that's just right for you! 
lor example, on Saturday 
October 16, a seminar wili be 
presented for students in- 
terested in the field of Public 
Relations and Business. John 
Mc( onncll, vice-president of 
the New York Stock Exchange 
and Tim Williams . account 
supervisor with Ogilvie and 
Mather will be on hand lo 
answer any questions that you 
may have. This seminar will 
be a golden opportunity to 
meet potential future em- 
ployers. To find out more 
about this seminar attend the 
next meeting, which will be 
Thurs. Sept. 30 1982 in room 
213 Kyscr Hall at 6:00 p.m. 
I lope to see you there! ! ! 



Omega 

Omega 



Psi Phi 



Kappa Sigma 

The Brothers of the Theta 
Mu chapter of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity are off to a 
busy year. 

On October 16, the Sig Dogs 
will raffle off a Honda Ex- 
press II valued at $500.00. 
Tickets can be purchased from 
any of our brothers or pledges. 

Congratulations to Alison 
Arthur who was chosen to be 
on the 1982 Homecoming 
Court. Ms. Arthur is also on 
the Kappa Sigma Dream 
Court and was Kappa Sigma's 
Dream Girl last year. 

The 1982 Fall Pledge Class 
is as follows: President Jon C 
Mouser; vice President Larry 
Todd Eppler; Secretary Chip 
Bernard, Jr.; Treasurer 
Harold Stacy Scroggins; 
Guard Douglas Wayne 
Williamson; Coleman Miller 
Martin, Ralph Henry Ingram, 
Fredrick Clarence " Butch" 
Brosett, Shawn Wyble, 
William Jerry Arledge, 
Gregory Charles Shoalmire. 
James Todd Klotzbach 
Denny Ray Bass, Davie 
Owens Webb, Jeffrey Lin 
Starne, John Harden Cun- 
ningham, Jeary Wayne Van 
Hosscn Jr., William David 
Garcia Jr., Hall Harlon, 
Jimmy Hadden, and Ted 
Gardiner. The tradition of 
excellence continues. 

Phi Mu 



brothers wilt 
continue with their high 
standards "I ill out in- 
volvement. A tew of the 
events scheduled lor this 
semes! < j includes: October 16 
Party at Holiday Inn after the 
Alcorn game. Community 
C lean-Up Drive, Sponsorship Darla l air L on 
of Thomas Day Care Center, Hughes ' Alice 



Sickle Cell Drive, Can Food Donna 
Drive, Visit to Nursing homes', anC | 



Kappa lota Chapter of Phi 
Vlu Fraternity is proud to 
announce its 1982 Fall Pledge 
class: Kara Andrews, Allyson 
Barron, Donna Box, Angela 
Champion, Shiela Cole, 
Judith Covington, Molly 
Dranguct, Monique Esquriex, 
Gates, Renee 
Johnson, 



Visit to Jail, Parties at Bayou 
.lacko's. Achievement Week 
Program, Founders Day 
Display . and various other 
projects. 

The officers elected for the 
1982-83 school year are as 
follows: Basileus-Charles 
Green, V ice- Basileus- Johnny 
Martin, Keeper of Record and 
Seals- Reginald WiUia m s , 
Keeper o Fii ance Tantalus 
Smith, Dean of Pledges-Peter 
Francisco, Asst. Dean of 
Pledges-.lariot Curry. and 
Keepr of Peace-Floyd F. 
James . 



Kay, Krisiinc 
McCausl' 



ill , 



Leone, 
Lynn 



Nicolle, Delia Roberts, 
Cannnic Salter, Kin Scoggins, 
and Janice Wheal. 
Congratulations new Phis. 
We are nroud of you. 

The officers for this year 
are: President, Alicia Haynes; 
Vice-President, K a r e n 
Schallhorn; Treasurer, Anne 
Hill; C o r i e s pond i n g 
Secretary. Xuan Rutter; 
Recording Secretary, Tammy 
Lal leur: Phi Director, Sheila 
Stewart. Rush Director, Cindy 
Duke; Parliamentarian, 
Marcy Thrash; Panhellenic 
Delegate, Brcnda Colli ns . 



I Ik- Studeitl i .o*ei nmeiii \v*VMIhJfl «.»'• 
illrJ it* (iiiU'i In SliK ; > soile.iu .tl t> |vm. 
k.lU.l \lltf|»ll> v.| | J the |M.|\ei .uul 1 lliVIl 
IfowttS led tlu- plcdiv IVn M.u\ moved 
iou- the H}fiMU> fu*iM the Sepiemki I* 
'itiii!. liol» IVatcc MV**tuk\l NliMto.li 
\ed AI'M-ut »eie: Allison \nhut. \l.uv 
Itnikk. IXixaI IVwIIc. Ill Wacidk. Se*l 
oik*. I'oli'ii I uuniiich.nn. and 
Kw. 

01 1 1 1 1 k k i pott is 

lot' SlillUO Weill lj|t'l iHtf Ili'tlKVlMllUlC 

ocm- and ciKiMit.ict.\l eu'tone io p.uiieip.iic 
IK- iiniled the scn.noi** to the hnnwh 
in Ja% . 



SGA Minutes 



SVufagu anjftetutecd the winner* ffj>m 

Ktllt". Mk'kx lovviiictui «lll hC .tl 
l incelinc. 

\ H.ifl nchl (Aifi i he htkfeei .uul »iud it 



the "h 

I lit' fKS 

1 .III 
look* tiv.il . 

H. it I, in lliinei viul ih. u the --ciuum 
cUvhoii- will Iv Wednesd.i* Sepienibci 2 K> He 
c\pi;iiiied i he pi oeeduic Uw the elee»ie>nv 

I Van Ho^ncc viul iliai l>i souilicil.ind 

.tppl 0\ ft! »»f i lu* si i \ e.O,llv 

ku-n Mewl. Student I iff. talked .thorn the 
MooJ ill ivf .uul Jw ».ud *-he -em .i leiiet to .ill 

Ol C.IUI.'.II lOtl" .ihi'tll II 

linJcei Ia.iiis. \l>(>^. mid ili.u ihere «.i- 
no liuk Iiiulinc a pl.iee loi the State I. in 



Blue Key 



Need help with a class? 
Accounting and Biology 
getting you down? Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity, 
again this year, is tutoring 
students who are having 
difficulty with a class. If you 
need assistance contact a Blue 
Key member, Special Services, 
or Larry Hall. Hall can be 
contacted at 357-4106. 

Blue Key members Stan 
Powell, Tantalas Smith, Steve 
Brandow, and Lytt Allen 
helped with the Potpourri 
banquet on Friday night of 
Homecoming. 

Kim Kimble, Amy Nell 
Padgett, and Vera LaCour are 
Blue Key's nominees for State 
Fair Court. Blue Key wishes 
these young ladies good luck. 

Cindy Duke, Blue Key's 
Sweetheart made the 
Homecoming Court. Blue 
Key congradulates Ms. Duke 
and thanks her for the 
brownies she provided for our 
meeting. 

The next Blue Key meeting 
will be October 6 at 7 p.m. 



Tri-Sigma 



M V\ 111 MM ss 

IVll Nl.l,\ imni\t I,, .ippi.'VC lh>' 
IIOMIUiMIM.l lH Rr. IYtr\ VhJcim'II 
*Y,'lkk\) NK'l H'li .IPP' rtl 

lr,»\ MbvldMM! nwnill by opvn h»»ihiii.ui,mi. 

i,m si.ii.' i .in Coon. r.'n. \n.k-i.iMi 
^v,'iKk\i N«*minaied were suua s,,i1.mu. 
km! kimHc. .in.! ki i.i i lk-\ J 



Kappa Alpha 

The Gamma Psi Chaptei of 
Kappa Alpha Order wishes to 
congratulate their Fall pledge 
class and to welcome them 
into their brotherhood. They 
are: Jimmy Adams, Randy 
Aguilar, Billy Jo Benefield, 
James C. Benet, Brian 
Bonnett, James E. Braswell, 
Chris DeBlieux, William 
Eaves, Jim Files, James 
Fisher, David Groman, Edgar 
Johnson, Mark Johnson, Paul 
Khury, John Kimmerly, Troy 
Maggio, Chris Maggio, 
Edward Martin, Kenneth 
McMichael, Steve McQueen, 
Danny Miles, Darrell Miley, 
Tommy Moore, John Norrid, 
Robert Roderick, Mike Saint, 
Derryl Saxton, John Shaw, 
and William Welch. 

Also we would like to give 
support to Mike Prudhomme 
who is running for Jr. Class 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa would like 
welcome to the sorority Trij 
Galjour and Carla Robert 
They became sisters this p 
week. 

The 1982 Fall Pledge CI 
would like to announce t| 
officers. They are: Preside 
Judi Humphreys, Vii 
President- Rosemary Bre 
Secretary- Jodi Werf 
Treasurer- Marjoree Mike 
Pledge Class commiti 
chairprsons are: Social-Tii 
Miguez, Special progran 
Tammy Gremillio 
Philanthropy-Terri LeDoi 
Scholarship-Shannon Conni 
lntramural-Noelle Or! 
Fund-raiser-Ann Flemin 
Public Relations-Trisl 
Galjour, and Panhel'eni 
Monica Aucoin. 

This past weekend, Se 
tember 25-26, was Sigi 
Kappa's Alumni Reunion. 



Senator and John Norrid who 
is running for Freshman Class were excited about the lurnoi 
Senator. Good luck Bro- and all had a great time' 
ther's. 

K.A. wishes everyone at 
NSU a happy and safe 
homecoming. Also, good luck 
Demons!!! 



Congratulations to Sign 
Kappa's intramural teams wl 
placed 3rd overall Tug 
War, and 2nd overall in PuB 
Pass, and Kick. 



Sigma Delta Chi 



Tn-^igma congratulations 
go out two beauties for 
making the Homecoming 
Court; Alison Arthur and 
Pauline Soileau. And we were 
especially proud of Laurie 
Weaver for representing NSU 
as our queen during the 
Homecoming game. Those 
pearly whites do it everytime. 

Last week I forgot to 
mention one girl who joined 
our sisterhood her name is 
Susan Arthur and we are 
proud to have with us! Sorry 
for the delav Susan. 

Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta Chapter 
of the Delta Zeta sorority held 
its second formal meeting 
September 13. 

At this time Epsilon 
Beta chapter would like to 
announce its pledge class and 
extend to them a warm 
welcome. The new pledge 
class officers are President- 
Janna Colbert, Vice- 
President -Kim Kocmich, 
Secretary- Den ise Chance, 
Treasurer- Robin Terwey, 
Parliamentarian-Tammy Du- 
coing, and Junior Panhellenic 
Delegate-Amy Viator. Other 
members of the pledge class 
are: Jaeklyn Connell, Tracev 
Bedell, Laurie Viator, Pam 
Ruser, Laurie Fox. and Susie 
Detiv eau. 



The Society of Professional 
Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, 
held their second meeting of 
the semester on Wednesday, 
Sept. 22. 

Guest speaker for the 
evening was George Cook, 
operations manager of KDBH 
KNOC. He emphasized how 
Mass Communications 
students can better prepare for 



the media and he talked aboi 
misconceptions in the radi 
field. He also said that havij 
experience in the media befoi 
seeking employment is 
definite asset. 

The next scheduled meetini 
will be on Tuesday, Oct. 
Room 106 of Keyser Hall 
communications majors 
invited to attend. 



The Current Sauce 
House Rules 

1. All stories, letters, pictures, etc. 
must be turned into our office no 
later than Thursday at 12 noon. 

2. All stories, letter, etc. must be 
typed. 

3. We will not print anything that is 
turned into our office after deadline 
unless the story hasn't happened 
before Thursday noon. 

4. Office hours M-W-F, 9-10, T-TH, 111 
J2, T-F, 1-2 (other times also 



6i 

Ai 
a: 



The Health & Physical Education 
Department will offer the following 
courses starting mid-term: 

PE 011, 45 Physical Conditioning 5-8 
MW 89/1 18 

Begins Oct. 18 
PE 026, 46 Bowling 5-7 TT 77/1 44 

Begins Oct. 19 



OUST" 



September 28, 1982. Current Sauce, Paae9 




The Student Union Governing 
Board Has Open Positions! 

The offices of 2nd Vice-President, 
Parliamentarian, Program Editor, Lady of 
the Bracelet pageant Director, Fine Arts 
Committee Chairperson, and a 
Representative at Large position are open 
at this time. Interested NSU students may 
pick up applications in Rm. 214 of the 
Student Union. Deadline for applications is 
Friday, October 1 at 4 P.M. 



PEOPLES BANK 

Student Checking Accounts 





If you're a full time high school, 
technical, or college student, you're 
eligible for a Peoples Bank Student 
Checking Account. 

The service charge is only $1.00 per 
month and there is no minimum balance 
requirement. 

Checks may be purchased 
at the regular price. 
Open your Peoples Bank 
Student Checking Account today 
at either location of Peoples Bank. 
Just another way 
Peoples Bank is helping you. 



PEOPLES 
BtfNK 



'/' >/F« n Hue; 



& TRUST CO NATCHITOCHES LA 



Each depositor insured to $100,000 



Sports 



Current Sauce, Page 10, September 28, 1982 



Demons Suffer Casualties 
In Homecoming Victory 



North w,c.ste.rn State 
University Demons heal the 
AO Wildcats 35-30, this 
week for a Homecoming 
victory. Demon fans will tend 
to ask if this was a victory or a 
loss for the Demons. NSL lost 
starting quarterback Stan 
Powell to a broken left wrist 
and then lost back-up Mark 
Leonard late in the game to a 
sprained knee. 

Ihe Demons were below 
there seasonal total yards per 
game average (V;ily getting 272 
total yards. Junior Mark 
Leonard threw lot 147 yards, 
three touchdowns and three 
interceptions. This was on 
^L\eii completions and 25 
attempts. NSLJ's leading 
receiver was Victor Otis with 
wo catches for 122 yards and 
two touchdowns. V.O. left 
the game early due to an 
unsportsman like conduct 
penalty. 

Abilene Christian amassed a 
total of 418 yards. The 
W ildcats picked up 212 yards 
rushing, lead by Gary Kinsler 
154 yards on 15 attempts and 
one touchdown. Wildcat 
quarterback Loyal Profit l 
threw for 206 yards on 36 
attempts and 13 completion. 
Ihe biggest statistic lot the 
Demons and the Wildcats has 
to be the number of in- 
terceptions that Profit! 
threw . 

Ihe Demon defense in- 
tercepted Profit! si\ times for 
a new NSU single game 
record, beating the old record 
of live. Michael 'Red' 
Richardson lead the defense in 
intercepts with two. Other 
Demons with one interception 
on the night were defensive 
backs David Hennigan. 
lommv Rushing. Spencer 
Mallet, and defensive end Karl 
'Moose' 1 ane. Leading the 
defense in tackles were 
defensive backs David 
Hennigan. Mike Richardson, 
anil line-backer Clary Reasons. 

The Wildcat defense was led 
by defensive end Billy Stiggers 
with 17 tackles and four 
quarterback sacks. 

NSU Head Coach A. 1 . 
Williams said about the 
defensive effort. '1 thought the 
secondarv did fairrv well. 



except for , 
mistakes. Tin 



few mental 
secondarv had 



some poor tackling in the first 
hall, but came thru when the 
chips were down.' Abilene 
Head Coach Ted Sitton did 
not like the way his quar- 
terback played, but did like 
the never quit attitude of his 
team. Northwestern will now 
take a 3-1 1 record and a in jury 
riddle quarter-backing crew to 
Commerce, Texas. Next 
weeks opponent the Last 
Texas State University Lions. 



Demon Playground 



The men's tug-of-war 
competition, marred by 
scandal and controversy, was 
won by Brotherhood, while 
Kappa Sigma finished runner- 
up. 

In the first round 
Brotherhood beat Tau Kappa 
Epsilon and advanced to the 
second round where they 
pulled against East Rapides. 

E'Raps proved no match for 
Brotherhood however. The 
Brotherhood then squeezed by 
Kappa Sigma in the fourth 
round to reach the finals. 
After the Sigs were set back in 
the fourth, they came back to 
outpullTKE, who had won by 
a forfeit when the University 
of Yang was disqualified for 
allegedly having too many 
men on the line, in the finals 
of the loser's bracket. 

For the second time in the 
tournament the Brotherhood 
faced Kappa Sig; this time for 
the championship, but 



NSU Faces East Texas State 



I he Demons play their final 
Lone Star Conference lean, 
this week against the East 
fexas State Ut.ivcrsity Lions. 

Northwestern is fresh off a 
Homecoming victory, over 
another Lone Star Conference 
foe Abilene Christian 
University, 35-30. The victory 
however could prove to be a 
costly one as starling quar- 
terback Stan Powell broke two 
bones in his left wrist and 
back-up quarterback Mark 
Leonard sprain his knee. The 
only good thing about 
Powell's in jury if there is one, 
the injury is not on his 
throwing hand. Stan will be 
able to play this week, if 
needed desperately. 
East Texas State brings into 



a 

game 



the game a well-balanced 
offense. The Lions are lead by 
quarterback Klye Mackey and 
receiver Wes Smith. The 
Lions will prove to be all the 
Demons might possibly w.ant 
as the Homecoming game 
against the ACU Wildcats left 
the Demons without 
quarterback of any 
experience. 

The best game of the season 
was played by the Demon 
defensive secondary, 
linebackers and ends as they 
all combined to pickoff seven 
passes of the ACU quar- 
terback. Northwestern goes 
into the game 3-1, and begin 
the hardest part of their 
schedule, as they venture 
down to Lake Charles to play 
the McNeese Cowbovs. 



Gold 
Nugget 

Announces The 
Tuesday Night Special 

j 2 fori i 

! Special Offer ! 

2 Free Tokens 
L__With_This Coupon | 

352-2236 
Dixie Plaza Shopping Center 



Brotherhood had just enough 
to win and claim victory. 

In the women's com- 
petition, VIPs came back from 
a third round loss to UnKappa 
5th to win a hard-earned title. 

VIPs rolled past Sigma 
Kappa and Tri Sigma number 
two in the first two rounds 
before being set back by 
UnKappa 5th. In the finals of 
the losers bracket VIPs 
squared off against Sigma 
Kappa for the second time. 



Again VIPs were victorious 
The finals of the women's 
competition was a rematch 
between UK 5th and VIPs. 
The tables were turned 
however, as the VIPs were 
crowned champions after a 
tough battle. 

The Punt, Pass, and Kick 
competition was a big success 
as there was a large field of 
entries on hand . The men's 

(Continued on Page 12 ) 



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...Just thought we'd do a 

little name dropping... 




SIKV1CI M 



613 Bossier 



Open 10-6 Mon.-Sat./352-8077 



|00 



i 

ollege 1 





★ . 


Pork 


er Pi< 


cker Panel ★ 


This 
Week's 






fig 




T f 






- J 1 


Games 


Roger 
Reynolds 


John 

( ii n n i n o h :* m 


Alison 

Rri**i /«>■! In 

■ »l l. t\t\ «llt' 


Joe 
Cunningham 


Sarah 
Mcknight 




Connie 
Johnson 


Tracy 
Taylor 


East Texas St. 
vsNSU 


NSU 
28-17 


NSU 24-17 


NSU 28-10 


NSU 31-20 


NSU 21-7 


NSU 21-14 


NSU 
21-17 


Florida 

vs LSU 


Florida 


Florida 
28-10 


LSU 35-7 


Florida 
31-20 


Florida 
14-6 


LSU 21-17 


Florida 
28-20 


Tulane vs 
Vanderbilt 


Tulane 
28-21 


Tulane 21-10 


Tulane 21-7 


Tulane 27-21 


Vanderbilt 
10-7 


Vanderbilt 

28-7 


Vanderbilt 
28-24 


Auburn 

vs Nebraska 


Nebraska 
34-17 


Nebraska 
31-14 


Auburn 25-17 


Nebraska 
31-27 


Nebraska 
35-21 


Nebraska 35-3 


Nebraska 
31-17 


Texas-El Paso 
vs Brigham 
Young 


BYU 
54-0 


BYU 21-14 


BYU 42-7 


BYU 68-0 


BYU 36-0 


BYU 42-3 


BYU 
42-14 


Mississippi St. 
vs Georgia 


Georgia 
28-14 


Miss St. 21-17 


Miss. State 
21-17 


Georgia 28-21 


Georgia 28-24 


Georgia 28-17 


Georgia 
21-14 


Michigan St. 

vs 


Notre Dame 
21-14 


Notre Dame 
24-14 


Notre Dame 
17-6 


Notre Dame 
35-27 


Notre Dame 
21-17 


Notre Dane 
17-14 


Notre Dame 
28-14 


Ohio St. 

vs 

Florida Si 


Ohio State 
24-17 


Fla. St. 27-20 


Ohio State 
25-10 


Ohio St. 17-14 


Florida 21-10 


Ohio St. 28-14 


Ohio St. 
24-21 


Iowa 


Iowa 


Iowa 35-3 












Iowa 
35-10 


vs 

Northwestern 


28-14 


Iowa 42-10 


Iowa 48-14 


Iowa 35-3 




Iowa - 35-3 


Beloit 
vs Grinnel 


Beloit 
14-7 


Beloit 24-14 


Beloit 35-6 


Beloit 21-7 


Beloit 3-0 


Beloit 7-3 


Beloil 

35-20 


Season 


75-5 


14-6 


15-5 


16-4 


14-6 
.700 




12-8 


12-8 


Record 


.750 


.700 


.750 


.800 




.600 


.600 



September 28. 1982, Current Sauce. Page 1 1 

Demons Place 
Fifth in 

McNeese Meet 



Reynolds Ties For First Holds Press Conference 



'Toial embarrassment," was 
the only way Roger "E.T." 
Reynolds could describe the 
Performance of the Porker 
Picker Panel at his weekly 
Press conference in the 
basement of old Bullard Hall 
'ast night at 11:54. 

Reynolds, who tied for the 
w eek's honors with last week's 
Winner and perennial flash-in- 
'he-pan, Joe Cunningham, 
was at 6-4. Also at 6-4 were 
John Cunningham and Walter 
Young, who were the only two 
t0 correctly pick Loras' 
Uprising upset of Coe, and of 
course, Laurie Weaver who 
*as the only one to foresee 
^lanford's suprise win over 
Ohio St. 

At 5-5 last week was Alison 
Br eazeale who continues 
assault on Bob Sjoberg 
record for worst start in P 
Ustroy. Rounding out (so to 
speak) the week's pick's was 
^ugar Bear who managed a 4-6 
record. After that em- 



barassment. Sugar Bear went 
to civil court and had his name 
legally changed to James 
Richardson so nobody would 
recognize him. 

Reynold's announced he 
was extending Alison's 
contract another week in 
hopes that her current slump 
might be over soon. At the 
same time, Reynold's an- 
nounced that he had been in 
close contact with several 
members of the NFL Today 
show and because of the 



football strike, he fell sure 
that he could trade both Joe 
and John Cunningham, and a 
player to be named later, to 
the show in a deal that would 
send Jimmy the Greek and Irv 
Cross to the P.P. Panel, and 
Phyllis George anywhere that 
Reynolds wanted her. Roger 
wisely declined comment on 
the plans for the former Miss 
America. 

For his final announcement, 
which drew a standing 
ovation, Reynolds revealed the 



three new guest selector's. 
First was Sarah Jean "Ho 
Wah" McKnighl and her Tri- 
Sigma friend, Connie "BoBo 
China" Johnson. Also picking 
this week is Lady Demon 
Tracy "If you give me a stupid 
nickname I'll cram a 
basketball down your throat" 
Taylor. Our special game of 
the week is that battle of 
unknown powers, Beloit and 
Grinnel. 



her 
s 
P 



The Best Little 
Frame Shop in Natchitoches" 

Sincerely Yours 

Dixie Plaza Shopping Center 
(Next door to Connie's Hallmark Shop) 
352-1699 9-5 Mon.-Sat. 



Canoe 
Shed 
Hours 

Monday 3-4:30 
Tuesday 1-5:00 
Wednesday 3-4:30 
Thursday 1-5:00 



I 



Cross country team im- 
proved in individual times, but 
the team result was a fifth 
place finish at the McNeese 
State Invitational early this 
week. The Demons will run in 
their third meet of the season 
Saturday at Louisiana Tech 
and then Saturday afternoon 
Northwestern will host a high 
school cross country meet on 
I he Northwestern campus. 

The Demons ran without 
sophomore Andy Nelson at 
McNeese, but those who did 
compete improved ihcir times 
and thai pleased Coach Leon 
Johnson. "We knew the 
competition at the McNeese 
meet would be very strong," 
noted Johnson. "Hut we were 
happy that everyone improved 
ihcir times and at litis point 
that is we arc looking for." 

Lamar won the meet, 
followed by Southwestern 
Louisiana, McNeese State, 
Stephen L. Austin and 
Northwestern. 

The i tip finisher over the 
five mile course for the 
Demons was Brian Barrios, 
who placed 17th with a lime of 
26.35. Michael Carver was 
25th in a time of 27.41 . C hris 
Maggio ran 30.42, Willie 
Edwards 35.11, Willie Garcia 
35.20 and Jerry VanHoosen 
i timed in a time of 35.30. 

The Demons will be one of 
several teams from Louisiana 
running I his Saturday at lech 
as the Bulldogs opened last 
week by winning a meet in 
Alabama. Johnson again 
expects very strong com- 
petition. 

Saturday afternoon at 3:00 
p.m. six high schools will 
compete in a 3.1 mile race on 
the Northwestern campus. 
Those teams entered include 
DeRiddcr, Rapieds, Mindcn, 
Mansfield, Pickering and 
Nauhiioches-Ccntral. The 
meet will start and finish on 
the intramural fields behind 
i he NSU track complex. 

ead The 
Sauce 



POSTING 
REGULATIONS 
FOR THE 
STUDENT UNION 

All signs posted in the 
Student Union Building 
must be approved in 
Student Union Room 
214 before placement. 
Place advertisements 
only on bulletin boards 
Those items posted on 
painted surfaces, glass, 
etc or not approved for 
posting will be taken 
down Thank you for 
taking care of our 
building. 



Current Sauce, Page 12, September ? 

More Demon 
Playground 

Continued from Page IT 

side of the event was won by 
the Pooterville Buzzards, who 
had a combined total of 1,460 
feet, nine inches for the three 
events. 

Kappa Sigma took second 
place with a total of 1,415 feet, 
line inches: just two feet, four 
inches ahead of third place 
finisher Conine. Jim Ambler 
of Kingpins took top honors in 
t he individual phase of the 
contest with a 417 feel, five 
inch total. 

UnKappa 5th were the 
victors for the women's share 
of the event by ouulueling 
their closest rivals bv more 
than 80 feet. UK 5th had no 
problem winning with a total 
of 886 feet; ten inches. Sigma 
Kappa number one finished 
second while Phi Mu number 
lour came in third. The in- 
dividual champion was Lynn 
Clary of Phi Mu, who had a 
total of 265 feet, si\ inches on 
the day. 

The horseshoes competition 
was held with a singles event 
and a doubles contest. The 
singles winner in the women's 
division was Annette Manuel 
of UK 5th. Sonja Griffiths of 
VIP took second while Sissy 
Palmer and Sidney Forrester, 
both of UK 5th lied for third. 

Forrester then teamed with 
Julie Cassel, also of UK 5th to 
take the doubles tital as UK 
5lh's Slcphany Washington 
and Tandra Lewis finished 
second with a strong showing. 
Odyssey's Tootie Carey and 
Kathy Carrol tied with Angela 
l.asyonc and Shiela Stewart of 
Phi Mu for third. 

James LaCa/e of Kappa 
Alpha took first in the men's 
division singles. Sigma Tail's 
John Frost came in second 
while James Nichols of East 
Rapides and Dane Broussard 
of KA finished in a third place 
tie. 

The doubles champions in 
i he clash were Jack Cobb and 
David Nardini of Tlieia Chi. 
John Frost and Jeff Fonda of 
Sigma Tan earned a second 
place finish on the day. Tan 
Kappa Fpsilon's Jon Robbins 
and Robert Triplet I finished in 
a lie for third with Donnie 
H ingle and James Nichols of 
i'Raps. 



Stand Tall Above 
The Ignorant.... 
Read The Sauce 




WILD 

WEEKEND 



This Friday, Saturday & 
Sunday Only! 
9 pm - 2 pm. 

The Domino's Pizza 
Late Night Special 

The world's No. 1 choice of 
pizza items, Pepperoni, is yours 
free on any 2-itetm pizza, with 
coupon. 

As always, 2 free cups of 
Pepsi with any 1 2" pizza, 4 free 
cups with any 16" pizza, are 
yours just ask! 



Late 
Night 
Special 




Lai 
Nig 
Sp 






DOMINO'S PIZZA DELIVERS 



To use Domino's Pizza 
coupons, please write your 
name, address and phone 
number on the coupon, and 
present it to the driver when 
your pizza arrives, hot and 
fresh, at your door. 




352-6382 

601 Bossier St. 



Free 

Pepperoni ! 



Free pepperoni on any 
1 2 2-item pizza 
One coupon per pizza 
Good after 9 pm only 
October 1 . 2 and 3 

Fast, tree delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



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aI a** 

• I a a. 



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Free 

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Free pepperoni on any 
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One coupon per pizza. 
Good after 9 pm only 
October 1 . 2 and 3 

Fast, tree delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



• O 

• IN 

w I o a 




urrent 




auce 



Vol, LXX No. 7 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




October 5, 1982 



NSU Pops Concert Tonight 



Ooophh! 



The first scheduled event at 
Northwestern's new A. A. 
Fredericks Center for the 
Creative and Performing Arts 
will be tonight, Oct. 5, when 
the Natchitoches-Northweste- 
rn Symphony Orchestra 
presents its 11th annual 
outdoor pops concert. 



Open to the public without 
charge, the inaugural per- 
formance begins at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Esplanade Theatre, a 
tiered brick and stone outdoor 
amphitheatre stage located in 
,the Center's courtyard and 
offering original pine and oak 
tree landscaping. 




K 



Northwestern Symphony conductor Dr. Robert J. 
Smith (right) and concert master Dr. Roert Price (left) 
discuss tonight's outdoor Pops Concert, which will be 
the first performance at the A. A. Fredericks' center 
for the Creative and Performing Arts. 

Alumni Association 
Elects Officers 

Natchitoches attorney 
Raymond Arthur was re- 
elected to a fifth one-year term 
as president of the Nor- 
thwestern Alumni Association 
during NSU's Homecoming 
celebration. 

The NSU Foundation board 
°f directors also met during 
Homecoming and re-elected 
Wayne McCullen of Nat- 
chitoches to a third one-year 
•errn as president. 

The Northwestern Alumni 
Association board of directors 
also re-elected Parker Wiggins 
°f Monroe as vice-president 
and elected Bill Cross of 
Natchitoches to secretary- 
measurer . 

Re-elected as members of 
tn e board were Dale Bernard 
°f Lake Charles, Carroll Long 
J? Lafayette and Arthur. 
~ r oss was also named to the 
b oard 

Ed Pierson of Natchitoches 
as re-elected vice-president 
° f the NSU Foundation, and 
r °ss was elected secretary- 
r easurer of the Foundation. 



Dr. J. Robert Smith will 
conduct the concert, whjch 
features motion picture and 
Broadway show music by 
George Gershwin and the 
musical themes from such 
movies as "Star Wars" and 
"Chariots of Fire." 

The A. A. Fredericks Center 
for the Creative and Per- 
forming Arts is a sprawling 
complex that has required over 
two years to construct a new 
64, 000-square-foot wing, 
lenovate the 40-year-old A. A. 
Fredericks Fine Arts Building 
and furnish the ultra-modern 
facilities. 

Considered one of the most 
modernistic and com- 
prehensive educational 
facilities in the nation, the 
Center is expected to become 
the cultural center for the 
community and region when 
the university's music, theatre- 
speech, art and dance 
departments move into the 
complex later this fall. 

The Esplanade Theatre is 
one of many attractive 
features of the Center. 

Its multi-level stage is 
designed to accomodate a 
variety of musical and 
theatrical presentations. The 
outdoor amphitheatre is 
located near the new main 
entrance to the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. The old entrance 
has been incorporated into an 
intermission deck for the large 
auditorium. Continued on Page ! 





Angela Lasyone just misses a return fling at last 
Monday's Intramural Frisbee competition. More 
on Intramurals in Demon Playground on page 10. 
(Photo by Alan Ford) 

NSU Enrollment Drops 



NSU had an enrollment 
of 6,481 students on the 14th 
day of class according to Dr. 
Austin F. Temple, Office of 
the Registrar. 

This is a decrease of 3.6% 
compared to last fall 
semester's enrollment of 
6,722. 

Of the 6,481 students 4,838 
are undergraduate students 
and 1,643 are graduate 
students. 

Dr. Temple believes there 
are several reasons for the 
decrease in students. One of 



the reasons was last fall there 
was a higher enrollment 
among graduate students 
because of the PiPs Program. 
This year there was a lot of 
indecisiveness among the State 
legislation as to whether or not 
Gov. Treen would pass the 
Pips bill. This caused several 
teachers to either postpone 
taking the PiPs classes or to 
take them in the summer. Due 
to this there was a slight in- 
crease among graduate 
students during the summer 
session. 



Trash An Issue At Rapides 



The east end sludge pit notwithstanding, Chaplain's 
Lake is still one of the prettiest and most peaceful 
spots on the NSU campus. (Photo by Melanie Daigle) 



by Beatrice Dawson 

Roaches are not the only- 
thing that seems to be ac- 
cumulating in and around 
Rapides Hall (with the help of 
some of its residents) because 
now garbage seems to be the 



next collectable item. Irritated 
by the movement of garbage 
barrels that had been 
positioned in front of the 
dorm, aggravated students are 
making use of the ground and 
continued on page 3 



Current bauce,rage z, ^cioucr _>,i70ii 


Tra 

Continue 




sidewalks 
waste. 




overflow! 
and scatt 
were put 


Denims 


to elimi 
problems 
waste in 
However 
the Resid 
south sid 


and 


REAL 
beginninj 
first flo< 
"The ba 
back on 


Diamonds 


could sav 
well as i 
are leavi 
coke bo 
ways." 
trash ou 
and car 


Is Back! 


clean ou 
take it t 
■ "One m 
pick up 
outside, 
that's N 
up the 1 
picking \ 
added th 
back, it 
residents 
would b 
baskets 


With an all new sound all new 


dance floor and video. 

No Club is Comparable 


instead 
overflov 

Co- 

continu 

The 


C/Royal Chevis J D. Turkey Bar Brands 

2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 Only 1.75 


been e< 
for the 
and soi 
care hi 
preserv 
vironm 


All sorority girls and college girls celebrate your birthday 
at 


area, 

include 

periphe 

The 


Denims and Diamonds 

We will provide free champagne and pay for your cake. 
Bring your decorations and be ready to celebrate! 


outdoc 

backd 

special 

panels 

chitect 

renova 


Also 

Ralley in the Alley is Back!! 


The 
bring 1 
to the 
becaus 
at the 
the fut 
be vie\ 


Denims and Diamonds wants to party with the Demons 
on State Fair Weekend. Fun and games are coming on 
October 23. Watch this ad for further information. 
The party place in Shreveport!! 


or the 
walkw; 
floor 
wing. 

"In 
traditic 
Taylor 
Schoo 
Perfor 
Covins 
fall 

•riverba 
one of 
i 'ts kinc 

i 


415 Spring St. (Next to the Square) 
318-949-9695 

. 



J 

I 



Current Sauce, Page 3, October 5. 1982 



Trash At Rapides... 



Continued from Pagel 

sidewalks to dispose "of their 
waste. Due to constantly 
overflowing garbage barrels 
and scattered waste, the cans 
were put in back of the dorm 
to eliminate some of the 
problems caused by scattered 
waste in front of the dorm. 
However, according to two of 
the Resident Assistants on the 
south side of Rapides Hall, the 
REAL problems are just 
beginning. Blake Chauvin 
first floor RA - exclaimed, 
'The barrels should be, put 
back on the front because it 
could save a lot of problems as 
well as flat tires, as students 
are leaving beer bottles, cups, 
coke bottles, etc. on walk- 
ways." They are throwing 
trash out of dorm windows 
and car windows, when they 
clean out their cars, and don't 
take it to the back, he said. 
"One morning I was told to 
pick up the trash on the 
outside, he went on, "but 
that's NOT my job; I'll clean 
up the hallways but I'm not 
picking up any garbage, tie 
added that if the cans were put 
back, it would help them (the 
residents) on weekends; they 
would be able to empty their 
baskets when they get full 
instead of letting them 
overflow in the hallways. 



Concert. . . 



continued from page 1 

The Esplanade Theatre has 
been equipped with facilities 
for the use of portable lighting 
and sound equipment. Great 
care has also been taken to 
preserve the ecological en- 
vironment of the courtyard 
area, which will eventually 
include stone benches on the 
periphery. 

The focal point of the 
outdoor amphitheatre is its 
backdrop, comprised of 
specially-sculptured cement 
Panels which follow the ar- 
chitectural motif of the 
renovated area of the Center. 

The public is requested to 
bring lawn chairs or blankets 
|o the outdoor pops concert, 
because seating is not provided 
a ' the Esplanade Theatre. In 
jne future, performances may 
be viewed from the courtyard 
0r the ballustrade, a covered 
Walkway along the second 
Hoor of the Center's new 
wing. 

"In a departure from recent 
ifadition," said Dr. John 
r aylor, director of NSU's 
^chool of Creative and 
Performing Arts, "we are 
Roving the pops concert this 
tal1 from its traditional 
' nv erbank setting to the site of 
0n e of finest arts facilities of 
lts kind in the United States." 



Dave Hendricks - second 
floor RA - proclaimed that 
this isn't anything new since it 
went on last semester but now 
it just seems a little more 
noticeable. He noted that last 



semester purple and white 
trash barrels were out front 
and did solve part of the 
situation. Now residents and 
others are dropping anything 
anywhere since trash con- 



tainers are not as available as 
they once were. "Trash lies 
everywhere and looks awful. 
These dorms need all the help 
they can get to make them 
continued on page 5 



Sheik Sues For Half Billion 



Saudi Sheik Mohammed Al 
Fassi has gone to court to seek 
half a billion dollars in 
damages from the city of 
Hollywood, Florida. In a suit 
filed in Miami yesterday, the 
27-year-old Sheik claims his 



civil rights were violated by 
Hollywood Police in July 
when they detained him for 
not paying a 1.4 million dollar 
hotel bill. The Sheik paid up 
and the charges were dropped. 
But his suit says he was falsely 



arrested, emotionally 
harassed, and slandered. His 
Lawyer describes the 
requested damage payment as 
"paltry" -- adding that the 
Sheik wanted to ask for one 
trillion dollars. 



Tunberg Will 
Bare It All 



Artist Bill Tunberg, who's 
50 years old, believes that 
older men shouldn't become 
"trapped in a set of values," 
He thinks they should be 
"Open to Life's Possibilities." 
And he means it enough to do 
it. The Santa Monica, 
California man is baring all, as 
November's nude centerfold 
in "Playgirl" magazine. It's 
the first time playgirl has a 
centerfold who's over 30. But 
the Magazine says the world i. 
ready - it says women like 
older men. 




trv and western, 

IS* Stt stirs mth 



1982 SEAGRAM MSTILERS CO, NYC AMERICAN WHtStfY A BlfJC 80 PROOF SeveMJp act 71F arc trademaita of Die SewrvUp Compaq 



Seagrams 




Opinion 

The Opinions expressed on (his page are solely those of the 
author's. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
University, its administration, the students or even the rest of 
the Current Sauce staff. The Current Sauce invites letters to the 
editor, which must be signed, as well as guest editorials, which 
must also be signed. Address all correspondence to Current 
Sauce, Room 225 Keyser Hall. 

Current Sauce, Page 4, October 5, 1982 



We,Too, Are Guilty 



MEN 
WHY 



IN 

SO 



By Raymond C. Cai 
Warrington Campus 

In the spring of 1982 the 
NSU College of Nursing 
graduated sixty-four (64) 
student nurses. Of the sixty- 
four (64) only five (5) were 
male. That is ratio of about 13 
females to 1 male. Why are so 
few men entering the 
profession of nursing? 

First and foremost, there 
are certain myths that need to 
be dispelled about male 
nurses. One of the strongest 
deterrent is the myth that any 
male that is interested in 
nursing must be either 
homosexual, effeminate, or 
perverted. Nothing could be 
farther from the truth. This 
myth is evident when male 
nurses are occasionally faced 
with the "raised eyebrow" of 
the general public. What's 
more, some males are 
questioned regarding their 
sexual perference because they 
chose nursing. 

Few people are aware that 
some of the earliest nurses 
were men. They were the real 
forefathers of nursing- the 
men who were responsible for 
tending to the injured victims 
of combat during the early 
wars. 

Another major conflict is 
that it is difficult for males to 
integrate their role as a man 
with their role as a nurse. 
Why? Because society dictates 
that males are not supposed to 
be nurses. In an effort to 
reduce the conflict of role 
strain, the men who go into 



NURSING: 
FEW? 

n, Jr., Nursing major, 

nursing choose an area of 
specialization, such as 
Anesthesiology, this is done in 
an attempt to be more than 
"just a nurse" because society 
expects more of a male. What 
is wrong wih men being warm, 
caring, and sensitive people 
who want to dedicate their 
lives to helping the sick and 
impaired? 

There are several reasons 
why the few men who go into 
nursing choose to. Some are 
seeking a profession with 
numerous specialties and 
unlimited opportunities. 
Some have an interest in the 
biological sciences. Still 
others go into it just for the 
feeling of being involved in a 
humanistic profession. 

I challenge you, the reader, 
to explore and dispell the 
myths that you hold about 
men in nursing and learn to 
appreciate any person, male or 
female, black or white, who is 
interested in serving the ill and 
infirmed. 

As soon as men show 
society that we have same 
motivations, share the same 
qualities, and are just as 
capable as our female 
counterparts of being excellent 
nurses. 

In closing, I am proud to 
say that I chose nursing. The 
field is beckoning for men and 
women alike. I encourage all 
men to continue to pursue the 
profession that you dominated 
ages ago. 




John Hess is a syndicted 
columnist of the United 
I Feature Syndicate 

UNITED NATIONS - It 
is a curious fact that the 
freest debate on the massa- 
cre in Beirut has been taking 
place in Israel. 

Elsewhere in the free 
world, nobody can ever dis- 
cuss the fate of the Middle 
East without being inhibited 
by our common burden of 
guilt for the Nazi holocaust. 
It is a guilt we cannot deny, 
because it showed what 
some men are capable of, 
and what decent men 
allowed to happen. 

Adding to this burden has 
been the pressure brought 
upon the media by misguid- 
ed friends of Israel, espe- 
cially in the United States. 
In its most extreme form — 
voiced by the neoconserva- 
tive pack — everybody who 
criticized the Begin govern- 
ment is an anti-Semite. 

No sooner did Begin open 
that ill-starred operation 
called Peace for Galilee 
than his sympathizers here 
took preemptive action. 
They accused reporters on 
the scene of exaggerating 
the casualties, and the publi- 
cist David Garth warned the 
networks that they were 
being monitored. 

Thus began a numbers 
game that goes on to this 



SGA Minutes 



I he Student tmvci nnient Assocutiun vv.is 
called 10 order by Skua Soilcmt .11 6:00 p.m. 
r«M Kppler Mid the prayer .itid I tieen 
llaynes led the pledge. Don Slues moved to 
aeeept the minute, from the September 20 
meeting. l*ro\ Davidson seconded. Motion 
passed. Absent cere: kayla Murphy, Scott 
Kepp. I.iuiic Weasel. Noel Nicolle, Peyton 
('iinmnttltam. Das id Saylots. Sony a I cms. 
and Bridge) Evans, 
OFFICER REPORTS 

Jik* Stanley thanked everyone who helped 
with Homecoming Week. He announced that 
Allison Arihtir and Perry Anderson will be 
helping hint with State Fair. 

He said I hut he wanted to make additions in 
1 he const it ul ional E lect ion Code. 

Stacy Soilcau announced the Student 
Services Meeting on Tuesday, at 4:45 with 
Mickey Tow nsend. 

Allison Arthur asked for a committee to 
decorate for the State Kair Brunch. 

Larry Hall, said that the Homecoming 
budgei was perfect. 

Harlan Hatvc) announced that the elections 
tor senator would be Wednesday, and asked 
the senators to sign up to work. 

Dean Bosargc said Homecoming was a iob 

til done. 
COMMITTEE REPORTS 

hll-M Hcv.l Ml-,!,-!.' i ;,,.., n le 



to pronuiieihe Blood Drive. 

Rohet 1 Soiinciil. V/CC. has found a place 10 
nave 1 he Slate Fait party inShtcvcpon. 

Dcinna (Jratl. SUOB. announced that the) 
hwre openings feu representatives anil the I OB 
chairman. 
NEW BUSINESS 

Don Stacy moved to apptove the Election 
Additions Committee which consists of the 
Supreme court. Jack Welch seconded. 
Discussion was held and I he M01 ion Passed. 

John W illiams moved to gel two plaques lor 
the Blood Drive. Bob Pearch seconded. 
Discuussion was held and Motion failed. 

Jack Welch moved thai no plaques he eiven 
for the Blood Dtive. Bob Pearee called for a 
division ol voles 8 yes; 4 no. Motion passed 
ANNL'NX EMENTS 

Joe Stanley announced, an Executive 
Meeting at 5:10 next Monday Distinguished 
I cclurcronlVl 1.1 • John KoavI 

Joe Stamey announced a legal Services 
Meeting liom MX)-4:00 011 Wed. There will be 
an attorney present. 

Joe also announced thai he did not JUDGE 
1 he Homecoming Patade. He had a panel of .1 
unbiased judges. 

Dean Napoli announced that Flag football 
will start Tuesday. 

Don Stacy moved to adjourn. Troy 
Davidson seconded. Motion Passed. 



Letters to 
the Editor 

Dear Editor: 

Short and to the point. 1 
think that the NSU Demon 
mascots' behavior at Satur- 
days game was very 
disrespectful. During halftime 
when the court was being 
presented, the Demon ran out 
onto the field with one girl in 
each arm. He looped around 
the thirty yard line then back 
into the endzone. I thought 
that this action was very 
irresponsible. I hope that in 
the future the Demon mascot 
can restrain himself during 
certain ceremonies. 

An Angry Student 

Dear Editor: 

I must congratulate the 
Current Sauce. It is the finest 
collection of press releases I 
have ever seen. Now what this 
school needs is a good 
newspaper. 

Robert Walters 



day. Harried and heartsick 
correspondents, who have in 
general done a remarkable 
job, were forced in self- 
defense to conduct a ghoul- 
ish census of the dead — as 
if the count made some mor- 
al difference. 

When the bombing of 
Beirut reached its paroxysm 
in early August, John Chan- 
cellor of NBC drew heavy 
fire for describing it as 
"savage" and "piracy," 
although every other report- 
er in Beirut seems to have 
filed a similar description. 

The Washington Post had 
to face a hostile crowd of 
readers, who refused to 
believe that it was not vici- 
ously biased. A cautious edi- 
tor of The New York Times 
deleted the word "indiscrim- 
inate" from the lead of its 
story on the bombing, to the 
outrage of its excellent 
correspondent, Thomas 
Friedman. 

All this was made almost 
academic by the massacres 
of Sept. 16 to Sept. 18. At 
least it would seem so, but 
for those same misguided 
friends of Israel. 

It should be noted that the 
first demonstrations and 
denunciations in this country 
against those atrocities were 
predominantly bv Jewish 
Americans. But their con- 
servative leaders sprang to 
Begin s defense by a com- 
mon reflex. 

A signal was a full-page 
advertisement by the Israeli 
Embassy crying "Blood 
Libel." Point by point, it was 
refuted by front-page 
dispatches, notably those 
from the Israeli press. 

We can perhaps rely on 
Israeli reporters to explore 
the responsibility of their 
government in this war 
crime. What I as an Ameri- 
can was most troubled by 
was our failure to examine 
our own responsibility as 
boldly. 

We largely subsidized the 



operation Peace for Galilee. 
We supplied the cluster 
bombs, and much more. Our 
government wrung its 
hands, our president even 
had his picture taken wear- 
ing a frown. But for the first 
three months we made it 
clear to the world that we 
did not much mind the turn 
of events. 

Following his departure 
as secretary of state, Alex- 
ander Haig openly con- 
firmed his support of the 
course taken by Begin, to the 
point of disagreeing with 
Reagan's modest peace 
proposal. And while the 

massacres were actually 
under way, Reagan offhand- 
edly said the Israelis had 
entered Beirut because the 
Moslems had fired upon 
them — a pretext that had 
not occurred to Begin. 

Once the news was out, he 
said he was horrified, and 
ordered the Marines back to 
Beirut, with Israel's kind 
permission. But who are we 
to criticize Begin? Our own 
honor has been indelibly 
stained. 

In our name. Philip Habib 
persuaded the Palestinian 
guerrillas to withdraw, leav- 
ing their families under our 
protection... How do we rid 
ourselves of that stain? 

Hardly anybody seems tc 
have asked what our 
Marines were doing in the 
godforsaken country in the 
first place. Is it not a job for 
the United Nations? Ah, but 
Begin doesn't like the United 
Nations... 

So now we have a war 
crime on our hands, and a 
land full of fear and hatred. 
There are solutions — there 
must be — but first we must 
make clear to the world that 
crimes against humanity do 
not go unpunished. In a spir- 
it of justice, we may perhaps 
hope to build a peace. 

Copyright. 1982, 
United Feature Syndicate. Inc 



Editor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 

Co-News Editor 
Barbi Hall 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Editor 
Susan Arthur 

Staff Reporter 
Marva Moxey 



Advertising Manager 
Alison Breazeale 

Co-News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Dianna Gratton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatlev 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Natchitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March J. 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times, Highway I 
South. Natchiloches. Louisiana 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is J57-545*. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are U yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchiloches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent ihe viewpoint of the 
administration, lacully. staff, or student body 
of Nonhweslern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and musi not be in any wav slanderous erf 
libelous 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter lor journalistic style and available space 

Send postal form number J579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU, Natchiloches, Louisiana. 71457. 



mm 



Current Sauce, Page 5, October 5, 1982 



SGA Revises Constitution NSU Rodeo Expecting Crowd 



Highlighting the September 
t 27th Student Government 
Association meeting were the 
announcements of an "SGA 
Legal Service," the revision of 
the SGA Constitution, A 
Distinguished Lecture Series 
Speaker and State Fair Events. 

The new "SGA Legal 
Service" will provide a student 
with the opportunity to meet 
with an attorney and discuss 
legal/financial troubles or 
questions. It will be held every 
Wednesday in the SGA 
Conference Room(221) from 
2:00-4:00 and the SGA office 
will handle the scheduling of 
appointments. This service 
will be free of charge and will 
begin on October 6. 

Joe Stamey, SGA President, 
emphasized the importance of 
people realizing the "impact 
of the Special Task Force 
appointed to study the 
Constitution, the election code 
as well as the guidelines the 
Supreme Court will be 
operating under." The 
Snecial Task Force will consist 

Pre-Registration 
And Grade 
Changes 

"Two changes have bee; 
made," according to Dr. 
Austin F. Temple, office of 
the Registrar "that will affect 
the student tremendously." 

The first is: If a student 
repeats a course, the last grade 
and credits made shall be used 
in computing the GPA. This 
means that if a student fails a 
course, and then repeats it and 
makes a C the quality points 
of 2 will be used as if this were 
the first time the student had 
taken this course. 

The second is that Englishl 
101 and 102 can be dropped 
from Nov. 29-Dec. 1, at 4:30 
p.m. 

For the first time at N.S.U., 
they will have an advanced 
registration for the spring 
semester. Students will be able 
to do everything that they 
would do at a normal 
registration except pay fees. It 
will be on the some idea a$ 
INSIDE VIEW for freshmer. 
in the fall. It will include only 
the Natchitoches Campus. 
The tentative date is Nov. 22- 
24. 



RAPIDES GARBAGE 

continued from page 3 

look nice without litter lying 
around them," he asserted. 

The south side seems to be 
suffering the worst from litter 
that is not properly disposed 
of, according to its residents; 
however, the east side remains 
fairly stable thus far with its 
litter problems and no 
r complaints were given. 



of the Supreme Court of the 
SGA, who will begin making 
changes. The decision to 
make such a revision was 
because of the many changes 
the SGA has undergone, 
Senate elections and number 
of candidates, for example. 

Jonathan Kozal, a Publitzer 
Prize winning Author will be 
the NSU Distinguished 
Lecture Series Speaker on 
October 13 at 9:00 a.m., Kyser 
Hall. All classes will be 
dismissed during this time. 



by Scolt Cox 

A large attendance is ex- 
pected for the Little Britches 
Rodeo to be held Sunday, Oct. 
10 at the Natchitoches Parish 
fairgrounds, according to his 
year's Rodeo directors, 
Mardell Sibley and Ronald 
Dunn. 

The rodeo, which is 
sponsored and run by the NSU 
Agriculture Club, is open to 
any youth 15 years of age and 
under with no experience 
required. 

"We're really expecting a 
, large turnout this year," 



commented Dunn. "Last year 
we had over 100 contestants 



and we raised over $700 for 
the Agriculture Club." 



A? GAS 

RAFFLE * 

Take your chance for *25 worth of gas. 
Get your ticket from any Tri-Sigma member 
Drawing will be held Oct. 24 or 25. 



MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 




This calculator thinks business. 
TheTI Student Business Analyst 



If there's one thing undergrad 
business students have always 
needed, this is it: an affordable, 
business-oriented calculator. 
The Student Business Analyst. 
Its built-in business formulas 
let you perform complicated 
finance, accounting and 
statistical functions-the ones 
that usually require a lot of 
time and a stack of reference 
books, like present and future 
value calculations, amortiza- 
tions and balloon payments. 



It all means you spend less 
time calculating, and more 
time learning. One keystroke 
takes the place of many. 
The calculator is just part 




of the package. You also get 
a book that follows most 
business courses: the Business 
Analyst Guidebook. Business 
professors helped us write it, 
to help you get the most out 
of calculator and classroom. 
A powerful combination. 

Think business. 
With the Student 




Business Analyst. 

Texas 
Instruments 



Current Sauce, Page 6, October 5, 1982 

1 982 SG A Class Senator Nominees 






7 



Don Stacy Michael Prudhomme Dean Napoli Todd Eppler Mark Thigpen 





Hi! My name is Don Stacy. 
I am a senior and have at- 
tended NSU for the past three 
years. I am running for the 
office of senior class senator 
and would appreciate your 
vote. 

While at NSU I have held 
the position of freshman class 
senator, junior class senator, 
member of the election 
committee and am currently 
chairman of the Distinguished 
Lectures Committee. Please 
vote for me this Wednesday; if 
elected, 1 will serve you to the 
best of my ability. Don Stacy 




With the arrival of Dr. Orze 
as president of NSU, I see a 
new role for student govern- 
ment - a much more active 
and responsible position of 
truly being a representative of 
the student population. I have 
entered this race with a desire 
to be a true representative 
having a voice in student 
affairs. Too long has our SGA 
been an idol status symbol and 
in the end accomplishing little. 
Look at the time spent talking 
in previous years about 
Chaplain's Lak e when I believe 
there were much more serious 
problems confronting us as a 
student body, such as how 
student funds and university 
monies have been used to 
support various programs. As 
the out-going president of my 
fraternity, I believe that I have 
both the time and experience 
to put forth an effective effort 
to reflect the opinions and 
needs of our campus. I would 
appreciate your vote of 
confidence for junior senator 
at election time. Michael 
Prudhomme 



Kimberlee Brent 

Have you ever been in a crowd 
of people with everyone trying 
to talk at once Maybe they're 
all saying the same thing, but 
noone can be understood. One 
voice, representing a group 
can speak much more ef- 
fectively. 

The Student Government 
Association - the link between 
student body and ad- 
ministration - was created to 
govern and serve the students 
of Northwestern. Without 
student input SGA is useless. 
They want to hear your 
opinions and ideas. They want 
to hear your voice. 

I'd like to be the voice for 
the sophomore class. I think 
student government is im- 
portant and I am willing, if 
elected, to put everything I can 
into representing my class 
well. Kimberlee Brent 




Alyson Rein 

My name is Alyson Rein 
and 1 am running for S.G.A. 
Sophomore Senator. In the 
past, I have served in several 
leadership positions which I 
feel will help me if elected. I 
am very interested in NSU and 
I will do my best to com- 
municate with you and help 
you with any problems you 
may have. Your vote will be 
appreciated. Alyson Rein 



This is a short message 
concerning the upcoming 
S.G.A. election. I am running 
for the office of senior 
senator, a position of which I 
think I posess the experience 
to hold. I have put forth a 
great deal of effort in the past 
year for the students. I was 
very much involved in the 
discussion and passage of 
several bills, including the cost 
of parking fines. I feel that 
alot was accomplished in the 
past year in S.G.A. and would 
like to continue working in 
this organization. Dean R. 
Napoli 




Dudley Hall 

I, Dudley Hall, am seeking 
the office of junior class 
senator, for the primary 
reason to further uphold the 
slogan "SGA: Students 
Making Things Happen". On 
first coming to Northwestern, 
I always had the desire to 
become a part of the mediator 
between the students and the 
administration, otherwise 
known as the SGA. My past 
position as president of the 
business club, the Society for 
the Advancement of 
Management, 1 feel will 
benefit me greatly in the area 
of representing the junior 
class. JUNIORS, I am ready 
to meet this challenge and 
waiting to become 
"NOBODY'S MAN BUT 
YOURS". Dudley Hall 



I want to be the Freshman 
Class S.G. A. Senator becausel 
feel I am the best candidate for 
the position. I have experience 
in leadership, I enjoy working 
in and learning about 
government. These are a few 
of the reasons I feel I can do 
the best job for the Freshman 
Class. If you elect me 
Freshman S.G.A. Senator, I 
promise to represent you to 
,the best of my ability and to 
always have an open mind to 
your suggestions for the 
betterment of NSU. I would 
greatly appreciate your vote. 
Thank you. Todd Eppler 




Christine Avant 

I, Christine Avant, a 
sophomore in English 
Education, am running for 
sophomore class senator. I 
feel my qualifications are 
twofold. First, I have the time 
to devote to SGA since I've 
attended every meeting except 
one for this last year as 
committee member and 
chairperson. Second, since 
familiar with Parliamentary 
Procedure, I will be able to 
conduct myself properly 
within the meetings with 
confidence and pride in my 
class and school. Other 
organizations offices I hold 
include SLAE - historian, 
Delta Zeta Sorority - house 
chairman, Panhellenic 
Delegate and Public Relations 
Chairman, Panhellenic 
Publicity Chairman and the 
Argus Publicity Editorship. 



I, Mark Thigpen, would like 
to announce my candidacy for 
SGA Senior Class Senator. I 
am a 1979 graduate of 
Mansfield High School and 
presently majoring in Physical 
Education. 

Elect me your Senior Class 
Senator and I will make it my 
duty to find out how you, the 
senior students, feel about 
certain issues. In order to 
make your time at NSU a 
more enjoyable one, I will also 
work with the other senators 
toward solutions to the 
problems facing not only the 
seniors, but the entire student 
body. 

If you want somebody 
different with a new opinion, 
willing to work, and not afraid 
to speak out for what he 
believes, then use your vote to 
help me help you. Your 
support will be greatly ap- 
preciated. Mark Thigpen 




V; 



Susan Johnson 

My name is Susan Johnson 
and I would like to announce 
my candidacy for the office of 
Junior Class Senator. I 
consider myslf to be a diligent 
worker and I possess a great 
interest in the many facets of 
campus life and business here 
at Northwestern. I would like 
the chance to represent the 
students here through the 
Student Government and 
would appreciate your vote of 
confidence in the upcoming 
election. Susan Johnson 



Current Sauce, Page 7, October 5. 1982 



1982 SGA Class Senator Nominees 






i 

Lesa Hatley Susanne Crawford Lisa Morse 



I want to define and help 
solve problems which face 
OUR freshman class. If 
elected I will use the advice of 
professionals at NSU to 
develop a questionnaire to 
find out what you, the NSU 
freshmen, think about food 
service, classroom instruction, 
recreational opportunities, 
registration procedures and 
the many other issues which 
affect our lives here. After 
finding out what you think, I 
will publish the results of the 
survey and communicate your 
wishes clearly and forcefully 
to the SGA, the faculty senate, 
and the administration. Let's 
make our four years at 
Northwestern happy and 
valuable. Lesa Hatley 



Hi! I am Susanne 
Crawford, a candidate for 
senior class senator. I am a 
broadcast journalism major 
and have previously served as 
Senator-at-Large. I have 
served on a number of SGA 
committees, including Student 
Services, State Fair, 
Homecoming, Spirit and 
Library. In my years at NSU, I 
have been interested in. 
satisfying the needs and 
desires of the students in 
making NSU a better place to 
live and learn. I believe my 
experience in SGA has shown 
me how to best represent the 
students' needs. So when you 
vote, remember Susanne 
Crawford for senior class 
senator. Susanne Crawford 



Vote 



...Just thought we'd do a 

little name dropping... 



/ 



% Of 



b<t» 



tela 



maw 





•tape? -arr^ 





















X 



Current Sauce 




A Great Way 
To Wrap Fish 





Noelle Orze Donna Jo Kelly 



My name is Lisa Elaine 
Morse, and I am a Freshman 
Senator candidate. I am a 
forward, dependable, and 
positive mover who enjoys 
working with others in 
tackling governmental tasks. 
Through my experiences, I 
have discovered that working 
with a diverse public is diligent 
work. I believe that I have the 
energy, willingness, and in- 
telligence to meet encounters 
with individual groups of all 
kinds. Most tasks are ef- 
fectively handled through the 
involvement of the student 
body as a whole. To get 
results, action must be taken. 
I would like to be elected as 
Freshman Senator of the 
Student Government 
Association to get things done. 
Thank you. Lisa Elaine Morse. 



My name is'Noelle Orze and 
I am a recent resident of Nat- 
chitoches, previously living in 
Worcester, Massachusetts. I 
have found that the students 
here at Northwestern are very 
enthusiastic about their 
university. It makes me feel 
very proud to be a part of a 
school that has so much going 
for it. If elected freshman 
:lass senator, I will help to 
promote Northwestern State 
University as a growing and 
prosperous university for 
incoming freshmen by 
representing my freshman 
class on the Student Govern- 
ment Association. Noelle 
Orze 



Running for sophomore 
senator means a great deal to 
me because I want to represent 
my class in the SGA. 

The one year I have spent at 
NSU has acquainted me with a 
great many people. With the 
your help, I feel we 
(sophomores) can have a 
strong voice in government. 
Having served as officer in 
various clubs in high school, I 
believe I have the adequate 
experience. I will be a senator 
to work with and for my 
sophomore class. 

When and IF I am elected I 
will do my best to serve you. 
Donna Jo Kelly 



613 Bossier 



Open 10-6 Mon.-Sat./352-8077 



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Wednesday 



Sub-Machine 

Sandwich Shop 

582 Front St. 
(Next to the Don Theatre) 



Buy one Sandwich 
Get one FREE 
with NSU ID 

Expires October 9th. 
Must present coupon to get purchase. 



For orders to go 352-91 34. 

Sundaes 20 Flavors of Ice Cream 



Current Sauce, Page 8, October 5, 1982 



Organizations 



PhiMu 



Ladybug Lane was a busy 
place this week! Thanks go 
out to the girls who worked so 
hard on our Homecoming 
float- good work girls! We 
would also like to thank Lytt 
Allen for his help. 

Sunday, the ladybugs met 
and attended Mass together. 
After Mass we had an old- 
fashioned "Dinner on the 
Ground" on the shore of 
Chaplains Lake. It really 
made for a nice afternoon. 

The Actives kidnapped the 
pledges on Tuesday morning. 
The pledges serenaded the 
residents of Caspari with their 
version of the NSU DEMON 
FIGHT SONG. After havng 
awakened the fotball team the 
pledges were taken to the 
Kappa Sigma house, the Phis 
sang the fight song twice but, 
the Sigs were "hiding". The 
next stop on the musical tour 
was the Kappa Alpha house. 

IFC 

Interfraternity Council 
wishes to welcome everyone 
back for the fall semester. The 
IFC held its first formal 
meeting on September 8, 1982. 
The IFC is the organization 
that governs all fraternities on 
Northwestern's campus. 

The officers of the IFC for 
the 1982-83 year are as 
follows: President, Robert 
■ Jackson; First-Vice President, 
Larry Hall; Second Vice- 
President, Robert Lewis; 
Third Vice-President, Stanley 
Jones; Secretary, Noel 
Nicolle; Treasurer, Jeff 
Hartline; Parliamentarian, 
David Nardini; advisor, 
Samuel Smith. Regular 
meetings are scheduled for 
every Wednesday at 12:00 
p.m. in room 221 in the 
Student Union. 

Kappa Sigma 

The Brother's of the Theta 
Mu Chapter of the Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity wish to 
extend our congratulations to 
the Demon football team for 
making Homecoming 
weekend a success with their 
win over Abilene Christine. 

The Sig Dogs started the 
Homecoming festivities off by 
entering their float in the 
Homecoming parade Friday 
nite. Special thanks goes to 
Homecoming Float Chairman 
Brother Randy Walsworth for 
doing such a splendid job. 
The float was in the shape of 
N.S.U. Demon Football 
helmet. It certainly was a 
unique piece of work. Super 
job Randy! 



Sigma Kappa Zeta Phi Beta 



Sigma Kappa is sponsoring 
a Spaghetti Supper tonight, 
October 5, at the Wesley 
Foundation. Serving Time is 
from 5-8 p.m. Tickets are 
$2.50 and can be bought from 
any Sigma Kappa active or at 
the door. 

This last weekend was a very 
busy one for Sigma Kappa. It 
began with a reception for the 
Greek women to meet Mrs. 
Orze, sponsored by our 
chapter on Saturday af- 
ternoon. Saturday night was 
our annual Grub Dance, 
where we all had a "toe- 
tapping time"! And last but 
not least, last night, October 
4, the big sisters were revealed 
to the pledges in a ceremony 
which followed dinner. 

Ag Club 

The NSU Agriculture Club 
would like to announce their 
new officers for the 1982-83 
year. They are Ronnie Dunn- 
President, Mike Van Damia- 
Vice President Mardell Sibley- 
Secrtary-Treasurer, Shawn 
Wyble-Photographer. 

Recently we held our Ag 
Club Banquet and presented 
two annual awards: Out- 
standing Male Ag Club 
Member to Ronnie Dunn and 
Outstanding female Ag club 
member to Mechelle Grey and 
Mardell Sibley. Our 
congratulations to these "go- 
getters"! 



FCS 



Last Tuesday's meeting ot 
the Fellowship of Christian 
Students was a very interesting 
one to say the least. George 
Black, minister of the New 
Life Center spoke on 
following the will of God. 

We would like to thank 
Michelle and Renee for the 
music that they provided. 

Just a reminder-FCS is a 
non-denominational organiz- 
ation, and everyone is invited. 
Meetings are Tuesday nights at 
8:00 in the Living room of the 
Home Economics Building. 



The Xi Epsilon Chapter of 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 
would like to welcomt 
everyone back to NSU. The 
chapter recently elected of- 
ficers. They are: President- 
Marion Johnson Vice- 
President, Dwanda Smith; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Tami 
Lilly; Dean of Pledges, 
Belinda Turner; Reporter and 
Dean of Probates, Dwanda 
Smith. 

After the first formal 
meeting on Sept. 5, the Zetas 
went to Catfish Inn to 
celebrate sorors Dwanda and 
Royce's birthday. The cold- 
steppin sisters also held a 
stomp show in the parking lot 
followed by a dance at the 
Showcase. 

wcc 

This year's WCC officers 
are: Robert Storment, 
President; John Russell, Vice- 
President; Pauline Soileau, 
Treasurer; Nancy Hensley, 
Secretary; and Andrea 
Baumgardner, Commissioner 
of Elections. 

On September 24, WCC 
sponsored a Pre-Homecoming 
Party at Mama Mia's. 

BSU 

Are you looking for a place 
to relax with friends and build 
a closer relationship with 
God? If so, the BSU is the 
place for you. We offer a 
variety of services aimed at 
drawing people closer to God. 
On Mondays and Wed- 
nesdays, we have Vespers (a 
short devotional) at 6:00. 
Tuesdays is Bible Study from 
6:00-7:00. Lunch, Noon 
Encounter, is served from 
11:00-12:20 every Wed. for 50 
cents. TNT (Thursday Night 
Thing) is at 7:00 every 
Thursday. We are planning at 
trip to the McNeese game on 
Oct. 9. Come join us anytime 
and bring a friend! 



SGA Legal Service 
Free Legal Advice 

Every Wed. From 

2-4 in the SGA 
Conference Room 

Call 357-4501 for 
an appointment or details. 



Tri Sigma 



On September 26, Sigma 
Sigma Sigma pledged two 
terrific girls. Their names are 
Cindy Olive and Linda 
Peterson. We are very proud 
to have these ladies with us. 

A special Sigma celebration 
is in line for Elycia Graham 
who was the mastermind 
behind our prize winning 
homecoming float. All that 
hard work sure pays off. 

Hey all youDemons- are you 
low on the fuel? You know 
that fine machine of yours 
won't run on fumes-so how 
about donating $1 for a 
chance in winning $25 worth 
of gas? Starting this week Tri- 
Sigma will be accepting your 
donations-so go for it and 
good luck! 



TKE 

The Epsilon chapter of Tau 
Kappa Epsilon would like to 
welcome our 1982 fall pledge 
class to our fraternity they are; 
Mike Barnes President, Ken 
Foster Vice President Scott 
Swilley--Secretary , Joe 
Gordon Seargent-at-Arms, 
Dennis Jeffares, Pete Adams, 
Greg Desothels, John Too 
Tall Harvey David Moore, 
Kevin Hebert, Ernie Goleman, 
DaveMichels, and Tully 
Thoirnton. The TEKE's would 
also like to announce our 
State Fair nominations. They 
are Brenda Foster, Kim 
Kimble and Marti Williamson 
We wish all of these girls and 
all others nominated the best 
of luck. 



Come Meet 
Your Friends 

at 

The 
Home 
Plate 

Specials This Week: 

Wednesday, October 6 

Specials All Night 
Draft Beer 50* 
Myer's Rum 50* 
No Cover Charge 

Thursday, October 7 
FREE Bar Drinks for all ladies 
from 9-10 pm with current NSU ID. 

Specials All Night 
Draft 50* 
Schnapps 25* 
No Cover Charge 

The Home Plate 



Current Sauce, Page 9, October 5, 1982 

--4-- —4—1982 State Fair -Court Nominees -I 





■Mil 







Kim Arthur Susan Arthur Stacia Caldwell Melanie Campbell Anna Cloutier 







Brenda Foster Eileen Haynes Kristi Heyd Debbie Keene Kim Kimble 






Vera LaCour 



Trudy Melancon Helene Morgan 








Sharon Sampite Dwanda Smith Stacey Soileau Debbie Vela 



J Elections | 

5 Wednesday^. 

T $ 
3 Please | 



Vote 



Sports 



Current Sauce, Page 10, October 5, 1982 



NSU Drops Game To East Texas 



Roger's Voice 



The Football Strike: 
Grow Up, Play Ball 



Well its fall and high school 
and college football are 
beginning to get into full 
swing. The football fan can 
go anywhere around the state 
and watch football games 
Thursday thru Saturday. The 
only problem however; is what 
to do on Sunday's, now that 
the pro football players are on 
strike. 

The key issues in the strike 
are: (1) Money, (2) How 
should money be paid. I 
realize that money is a key to 
everybody in the world's 
success and also that the 
players deserve a little more 
than some other athletes 
because football is a rough 
sport. 

Pro football players must 
also realize that during this 
strike, they are hurting their 
pocket books and most of all, 
the pro game of football itself. 

This strike can only help 
college football and the 
Canadian Pro Football game. 
The average fan finds it hard 
to believe anyway at times, 
how much one person gets 
paid to play four or five 



months out of the year. 

1 know the big issue is the 
players want some of the 
money the owners get for 
televising and some of the gate 
money. The players must also 
realize, the owners have bills 
and expenses to pay with that 
money they receive. The 
second issue in the situation is 
really dumb. From all that I 
have read and heard the 
players also want bonuses, 
such as incentives and other 
types of knit picky stuff that 
will just actually be giving 
them another raise, besides the 
money that they already 
receive. 

This is one writer and Pro 
football fan that says to heck 
with the strike, 'Fella's Let's 
Play Football.' 

NOTE: A Canadian Pro 
Football game is shown on one 
channel every Sunday in place 
of the NFL. There will be 
another next Sunday, if the 
players are still on strike. This 
is something for all Pro 
football fans to think about, 
while watching the Canadians 
play football. 



The Demons travelled to 
Commerce, Texas to play the 
East Texas State University 
Lions and came back a loser 
by the score of 24-20. Nor- 
thwestern lost the game with 
one minute and fifty-nine 
seconds left to go in the game. 
ETSU scored when Kyle 
Mackey found Mark Smith in 
the end zone for a touchdown. 
The Lions were helped on this 
drive by two Demon penalties. 
NSU's final penalty came 
when Tommy Rushing was 
:alled for an interference at 



the one yard line. What made 
this an important penalty is 
that linebacker Gary Reasons 
had intercepted the ball in the 
end zone. Northwestern 
would have had the ball on 
their twenty with less than two 
minutes left on the clock. 

Wayne Van started at 
quarterback for the Demons 
and did a very creditable job in 
his first start as a Demon. Van 
was 14 for 22 with one in- 
terception and two touc- 
downs. NSU was led again in 
receiving by Victor Oatis with 



Demons Travel To 
McNeese Saturday 



Coach A. L. Williams and 
the Demons will try to 
rebound this week after e. 
disappointing 24-20 loss to the 
Lions of East Texas State. 

Northwestern will travel tc 
Lake Charles to play the 
Cowboys of McNeese State. 
The Cowboys are lead by 
possibly the best all-around 
quarterback the Demon 
defense has faced all year and 
his name is Stephen Starring. 
Starring is a threat to run or 
pass the ball. The Cowboys 
also have a good running 
attack lead by Theoron 
McClendon. In last year's 
contest, the Cowboys played 
NSU in Natchitoches and took 
the Demons apart with a good 
rushing and passing attack. 

The Demons will more than 
likely look again for 
sophomore Wayne Van to 
start at the Demon helm. 
Bobby Herbert also is hoping 
his ribs are healed enough to 
let him play, this week. 
Herbert played in last week's 
loss, throwing for five yards 
on two attempts. 

This week again, the 
Demons must have and all out 
defensive effort. If the 
defense does not hold the 
Cowboys tough, it could be a 
lon g night for NSU players. 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army it also 
means you re an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



coaches, and fans. For the 
Demons are now into the heart 
of their '82' schedule. 

NSU must also look to 
the running game this week to 
balance out the passing attack. 

If anything can be a big 
question mark for the Demons 
it is the rushing game and the 
Demon defensive secondary's 
ability to stop the pass. 



five catches for 70 yards. The 

Demons lacked a rushing 
game this week, as they only 
rushed for a total of 43 yards 
on 48 attempts. 

While the Demon rushing 
game was having trouble the 
Lions were running up 106 
yards rushing and 256 yards 
passing on 40 attempts and 21 
completions and one big 
touchdown pass. 

NSU's defensive effort was 
lead this week by defensive 
end David Grappe with 11 
tackles and one blocked pass. 
Cornerback Terry Ber- 
trandhad 10 tackles on the 
night for the defense. 

Northwestern will try to get 
back on the winning track this 
week, which won't be easy as 
the Demons travel to play the 
always tough McNeese State 
Cowboys in Lake Charles. 
McNeese comes into the game 
with a disappointing one win 
and three losses, while the 
Demons bring a 3-2 record 
into Lake Charles. 



******************* 



Where Something Special Happens 
EveryMaht 





Mon. 

Tues.fnQU me", ID'S Mdm^Fee $1.00 
drinkS,^PIayinM Tues. ntbht, the hottest 
band in Shjeyefport "Jami^Slph'e". 

Wed.-Beer ^ust $5.00. %ll 
drink $5.00. f 



you can 



Thurs.-Evety thing Happens Tonight- 
Ladies Nite. All ladies free ylus a free 
drink. Cooks Promotion Nite-$.50 long 
necks andLdtaft for everyone. Free t- 
shirts and mahjjjrizesto pe given away. 



Fri.-Sat.-Ron 




he Bayou. 



Cotnin 
Billy Rendl 



We are available any night for sorority 
fraternity parties with live band furnished. 



Hwy. 1 South 



* 
* 

or M 



******************* 



Current Sauce, Page 1 1 , October 5, 1982 



* Porker Picker Panel ★ 



This 
Week's 




1 

mm > 








^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




#% 






Games 




Roger 
Reynolds 


John 
Cunningham 


Alison 
Breazeale 


Joe 
Cunningham 




Dwanda 
Smith 


Don 

Stacy 


Beebe 
Adkins 


McNeese 
vs NSU 


NSU 
28-27 


NSU 


NSU 
28-25 


NSU 
41-35 


NSU 
28-14 


NSU 
7-6 


NSU 
13-7 


LSU vs 
Tennessee 


LSU 
24-10 


LSU 
27-14 


LSU 
17-10 


LSU 
35-30 


LSU 
30-7 


LSU 
35-24 


LSU 
14-7 


Alabama 
vs Penn St. 


Penn St. 
28-21 


Penn St. 
31-24 


Penn St. 
21-17 


Penn St. 
n i*; 

1 /-ID 


Alabama 
27-14 


Alabama 
21-20 


Alabama 
21-7 


Minnesota 

vs 

Northwestern 


Minnesota 
21-10 


Minnesota 
56-0 


Minnesota 
35-10 


Minnesota 
63-7 


Northwestern 
27-26 


Minnesota 
67-0 


Northwestern 
13-12 


Michigan vs. 
Michigan St. 


Michigan 
28-7 


Michigan 
28-21 


Michigon 
25-17 


Michigan 
21-10 


Michigan 
32-27 


Michigan 
17-7 


Michigan 
21-0 


Southern Miss 
vs 

Mississippi St. 


Miss. St 
35-14 


1V1ISS. 91. 

24-14 


Miss. ST. 
17-7 


Miss. St. 
24-20 


USM 
27-17 


Miss. St. 
21-20 


Miss St. 
21-14 


Notre Dame 
vs Miami 


Notre Dame 
21-17 


Notre Dame 
20-17 


Notre Dame 
. 14-7 


Notre Dame 
10-7 


Notre Dame 
27-14 


Notre Dame 
35-31 


Notre Dame 
20-0 


Texas vs 
Oklahoma 


Oklahoma 
35-21 


Oklahoma 
28-24 


Oklahoma 
25-17 


Oklahoma 
28-20 


Texas 
32-17 


Texas 
21-0 


Texas 
21-20 


Air Force 
vs Navy 


Navy 
21-17 


Navy 
31-21 


Navy 
35-14 


Navy 
35-28 


Air Force 
26-17 


Navy 
21-7 


Air Force 
7-0 


A Ima vs 
Kalamazoo 


Kalamazoo 
35-7 


Kalamazoo 
17-10 


Alma 
65-35 


Kalamazoo 
27-3 


Alma 
33-29 


Alma 
31-14 


Tie 
7-7 


Season 
Record 


21-9 
.700 


20-10 
.666 


20-10 
.666 


22-8 
.733 


22-8 
.733 


20-10 
.666 


19-11 

.633 



Braves, Brewers 
Clinch Titles 



The Atlanta Braves and 
Milwaukee Brewers both 
clinched division cham- 
pionships on the last day of 
the season, while the 
California Angels nailed down 
their division title on Satur- 
day. 

Atlanta loss to the Padres 5- 
1, but the Los Angles Dodgers 
also lost to the San Francisco 
Giants 5-3 on a seventh inning 
three-run homer by vetran 
second baseman 'Little' Joe 
Morgan. The Brewers 
meanwhile had an easier time 
with the victory as they beat 
the Orioles in Baltimore, 10-2. 
For Baltimore, this was Earl 
Weaver's last game as the 
Birds manager. 

Robin Yount led the 
Brewers to victory as he went 
three for four including two 
home runs and a triple. Cecil 
Cooper and catcher Ted 
Simmons also added home 
runs for the champion 
Brewers. 

'Mr. October', Reggie 
Jackson, led the Angels the 
day before as he started the 
Angels on the way to a victory 
over the Texas Ranagers, 6-4 
with a home run of his own. 

Now that the regular season 
is over, so begin the playoffs 
with the Braves playing the St. 
Louis Cardinals in St. Louis 
on Tuesday. The Brewers, 
meanwhile, will travel to 
Anaheim, California to play 
the Angels Tuesday night. 



Guest Selector's Humiliate Panel Irregulars 



Guest selector's Sarah "Ho 
Wah" McKnight, Connie 
"Bobo China" Johnson, and 
Tracy "Tonsil's" Taylor 
embarrassed the field of self 
proclaimed experts on the 
Porker Picker Panel by 
picking eight out of ten games 
right ("Ho Wah and Bobo 
China") and seven out of ten 
games ("Tonsil's"), in last 
week's preditions. 

The P.P. panel's staff of 
irregulars showed what real 
stooges they were last week in 
Posting the worst combined 
week to date. Roger Reynolds, 
John Cunningham, and Joe 
Cunningham each had 
miserable 6-4 records while 
Alison "I'm so embarrassed" 
Breazeale limped through with 
a 5-5 worksheet. 

Regardless Of the stupidity 
°f his picks, not to mention 
the general bad taste in picking 
Florida over LSU, Joe 
Cunningham stayed clinging 
to a narrow one game lead 



over Roger "Pac Man" 
Reynolds in the race for the 
Highman Trophy, symbol of 
football forecasting ex- 
cellence. However, in a major 
suprise, the first guest selector 
is tied with Joe for the top 
spot. Speculation has arisen as 
to what will happen if and 



when the guest selector takes 
over first place. Unconfirmed 
reports say that Reynolds is 
contemplating abolishing the 
guest selector spot and filling 
it with three regulars from the 
dairy barn. 

Sitting two games out this 
week are John Cunningham 



and Alison Breazeale. Alison 
gained the P.P. panel's pick of 
the week for her upset 
prediction of LSU over 
Florida. Also guessing that 
game right was "Bobo 
China", who demanded a 
regular spot for herself and 
Miss "Ho Wah", as well as 



"Tonsil's. Reynold's said that 
under no circumstances would 
he let the three of them 
become regulars. 

This week, the P.P. 
welcomes three new 
selector's ' They 
Dwanda Smith, Don 
and Miss Beebe Adkins. 



Panel 
guest 
are 
Stacy, 



State Fair 
Tickets 

Tickets on sale today 
through Friday, October 22, 
at 12:00 noon, at the 
Fieldhouse. All students 
must have ID. No tickets will 
be issued without the ID. 



3^- 



*4 



Shamrock Restaurant 

Charcoal Hamburgers and Steaks 
Oysters on the Half Shell 
Smoked BBQ Sandwiches and Chicken 
Daily Specials 
Full Service Bar and Player Piano 

302 Highway 1 South 11-10 daily 
352-8309 11-11 Fri. and Sat. 



f Demon j 
\Playground^ 

The intramural swim meet 
was held two weeks ago at the 
Re'creation Complex with 
participation in ten events. 

Among the events were the 
200 meter medley relay, the 25 
and 100 meter freestyle, the 
200 meter freestyle relay, the 
25 and 100 meter backstroke, 
the 25 and 50 meter breast- 
stroke, and the 25 and 50 
meter butterfly. 

The women's bracket 
win. n,er was Sigma Kappa who 
wn four events and would up 
with 33 total points. UrKappa 
5th took second with 32 points 
and six first place finishes. 
VIP's rounded out the 
women's portion of the 
contest as they came in third 
with seven points. 

3-V International took top 
honors in the men's division 
with wins in four events and 23 
points. Los Amigo's also won 
four events, but finished 
second with 20 points. The 
Kappa Sig's took third with 18 
points ad one victory. 

The frisbee competion was 
also held, and had a good 
turnout. Eddie McDugle of 
Com'nescored25 points in the 
frisbee throw to take in the 
men's contest. K.A.'s Merrick 
Pierce finished second with a 
21, point total, while Sig Dog, 
Steve Alan and Mark Diblin of 
East Rapides tied for third 
with 20 points apiece. 

The women's division 
champ was Sherri Broocks of 
UnKappa 5th. Sherri's total 
ran to 24 points. Julie Cassel, 
also of U.K. 5th finished 
second with 18 points which 
was good enough to tie her 
with Phi Mu's Angela Lasyone 
for third place. 

The golf tournament was 
also a success as it drew a large 
crowd of participants in the 
one day contest. Dane 
Thompson took the men's title 
with a one-over par 36 for nine 
holes. Yang's James Smith 
and Joe Bienvenu took second 
and third place finished with 
totals of 37 and 38 respec- 
tively. 

Tri-Sig's Kim Gill led all 
women with a nine hole total 
of 43. Janet Guerrine of U.K. 
5th finished with a 22 over par 
total of 57 for second place. 
Johnny Kay Heard, also of 
U.K. 5th finished third with a 
61. 



Stand Tall Above 
The Ignorant.... 

Read The Sauce 



Current Sauce, Page 12 



WILD 

WEEKEND 



This Friday, Saturday & 
Sunday Only! 
9 pm - 2 pm. 

The Domino's Pizza 
Late Night Special 

The world's No. 1 choice of 
pizza items, Pepperoni, is yours 
free on any 2-item pizza, with 
coupon. 

As always, 2 free cups of 
Pepsi with any 1 2" pizza, 4 free 
cups with any 16" pizza, are 
yours just ask! 




DOMINO'S PIZZA DELIVERS® 



Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 1 1 am - 1 am 
Fri. & Sat. 1 1 am - 2 am 

To use Domino's Pizza 
coupons, please write your 
name, address and phone 
number on the coupon, and 
present it to the driver when 
your pizza arrives, hot and 
fresh, at your door. 




352-6382 

601 Bossier St. 



Free 

Sausage! 



Free on any 
1 2" 2-item pizza 
One coupon per pizza 
Good after 9 pm only 
October 8, 9 and 10. 

Fast, free delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



• 


10 

b 

z< 


"•I 


X N 

OB 

a a. 


• 



I 

Free 

Sausage! 



Free on any 
1 6" 2-item pizza. 
One coupon per pizza. 
Good after 9 pm only 
October 8. 9& 10. 

Fast, free delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



• O 

=1 ~< 

m on 

w I oa 




urrent 




auce 



Vol, LXX No. 8 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




October 12, 1982 



Orze Leaves For Poland 



Northwestern president Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze will lead a five- 
member delegation to Poland 
Oct. 13-20 to finalize an 
educational exchange 
agreement between the Polish 
Ministry of Science, Higher 
Education and Technology 
and the American Association 
of State Colleges and 
Universities. 

The U.S. monitoring 
council-comprised of college 
and university presidents 
representing the 354 in- 
stitutional members of 
AASCU-will spend a week 
with Polish education officials 
discussing the implementation 
of the agreement, which will 
initially concern the exchange 
of faculty members. 

This agreement, which 
could eventually lead to the 
exchange of students, ad- 
ministrators, educational 
materials and cultural 
Programs between the two " 
countries was developed 
following an AASCU mission 
•o Poland two years ago. Orze 
also headed that mission. 

"The Polish university 
system is outstanding and 
provides excellent op- 
portunities in almost all fields 
of interest," stated Orze, who 
has been a member of the 
AASCU board of directors 
since 1978. 



Kim Kimble Named 
State Fair Queen 



"Faculty will be involved in 
the initial exchange," he said. 
"After that, we will discuss 
the development of further 
exchange programs which 
respond to the needs of the 



Polish universities." 

During their week in 
Poland, the members of the 
monitoring council from the 
AASCU will visit several 
hidier education institutions. 



SGA Senator Elections 
Held Last Wednesday 



By Beatrice Dawson 

The 1982 Class Senator 
election, held in conjunction 
with the State Fair election, 
were voted on during a final 
run-off Wednesday. 

Todd Eppler, a business 
administration and economics 
major from Natchitoches and 
Lesa Hatley, a mass com- 
munications-broadcast major 
'from Natchitoches, were 
elected as freshman senators, 
while sophomore Kimberlee 
Brent, an elementary 
education major from Grant; 
and Donna Jo Kelly, from 
Anacoco, were elected to 
represent their class. The new 
Junior Class Senators are 
Dudley Hall, a business ad- 
ministration and computer 
science major from 
Shreveport; and Susan 



Johnson, an accounting major 
from Houston. Seniors Dean 
Napoli, a business ad- 
ministrations major from 
Melville; and Don Stacy, a 
computer science major from 
Natchitoches were also elected 
class senators. Commissioner 
of elections, Harlan Harvey, 
said that it seemed as though 
the weather had an affect on 
voter turnout because it wasn't 
quite as good as //omecoming 
election. He said that it's hard 
to get people out to vote but 
once they are out, they don't 
mind voting. "However," he 
went on, "the voting went 
smoothly with no flaws and 1 
want to thank my election 
board which is composed of 
students from different 
organizations." 



Jonathon Kozol Opens 
Distinguished Lecture Series 



Jonathan Kozol, a noted 
social activist and writer about 
tn e nation's education system, 
*>U speak tomorrow, Oct. 12, 
* l Northwestern to open 
fSU's 1982-83 Distinguished 
Lecture Series. 

Kozol's address at 9 a.m. in 
^ditorium of John S. Kyser 
H all of Arts and Sciences is 
entitled, "Education: Ethics 
0r Indoctrination." His 
Presentation is open to the 
Public without charge. All 

: °° classes will be cancelled . 

Educated at Harvard and 
!| So a Rhodes scholar at 
°*ford University, Kozol 
^'Tacted national attention in 
'968 when his first book, 

°eath At An Early Age," an 
account of classroom life in 
B °ston, won the National 



Book Award. 

Other major books on 
education by Kozol include 
"Alternative Schools: A 
Guide for Educators and 
Parents," which updates and 
expands his study of free 
schools; "Prisoners of Silence: 
Breaking the Bonds of Adult 
Illiteracy in the United 
States," a landmark 
publication addressing itself 
directly to an important 
American problem; "On 
Being A Teacher" and "The 
Night Is Dark and I Am Far 
From Home: A Political 
Indictment of the U.S. Public 
Schools." 

Kozol is also well known for 
his book, "Children of the 
Revolution," which is based 
on his visit to Cuba in the 



1970's. 

"From his observations in 
Cuba," said Thomas N. 
Whitehead, chairman of 
NSU's Distinguished Lecture 
Series, "Kozol has also 
strutured a theory of 
eliminating illiteracy in the 
U.S. within one year of im- 
plementation." 

Whitehead described Kozol 
as "usually controversial but 
always thought-provoking." 

"Alternative Schools: A 
Guide for Educators and 
Parents" is scheduled for 
nationwide distribution in 
November. This is a revised 
volume of his classic work, 
"Free Schools, which 
originally appeared in 1972. 

According to Kozol, the last 
continued on page 3 



B> Beatrice Dawson 

Kim Kimble, a sophomore? 
nursing major from 
Alexandra, has been elected as 
the 1982 State Fair Queen for 
Northwestern's 43rd state fair 
anniversary. Miss Kimble was 
chosen by the Northwestern 
student body in a campus-wide 
election conducted Wednesday 
by the Student Government 
Association. 

The daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nelson D. Kimble of 
Alexandria, Kim is a 1981 
graduate of Alexandria Senior 
High School. Upon entering 
NSU, she was awarded 
I tie Fresh mail Nursing 
Scholarship. 

A member of Phi Mu 
Sorority, Northwestern's 1982 
Stale l air Queen also serves as 
Senator-at-Large on the SGA, 
as secretary of the Student 
Nurses Association, and as 
chairman of the Social 
Programs Committee of the 
SGA. She was also a member 
of the Student Union 
Governing Board Concert 
Committee. 

In addition, eight other 
young ladies were also chosen 
10 represent NSU on the 1982 
State Fair Court: Kim Arthur, 
a sophomore-pre-professional 
psychology major from 
Florien; Susan Arthur, a 
freshman-journalism major 
from Natchitoches; Anna 
Clout ier, a senior-nursing 
iajor fro m Natchitoches 




Kim Kimble 

Eileen Hay ties, a sophomore- 
broadcasi journalism major 
from Saline; Vera Marie 
l.aCour, a senior-business 
ad rninlsl rat i o n in a j o i 
Shrevepon; Dwandu Marie 
Smith, a junior-broadcast 
journalism major from 
Houma; Stacy Soileau, a 
senior-computer science major 
from Bossier City; and Debra 
Vela, a senior-nursing major 
from Houston. 

State laii activities will 
begin the week of Oct. 18 and 
continue through Saturda) 
night's NSU-Tcch football 
game. The court will be 
formally presented during pre- 
game activiies in the State l air 
Stadium. The game will start 
at 7 p.m. and will denote the 
7()lh time NSU has 
lech. 




This little girl sure seems real interested in the 
goings on at the annual Pops concert held last 
Tuesday. (Photo by Melanie Daigle) 



Current Sauce, page 2, October 12, 1982 




Moon Holds Big Wedding 



Poland Kills Solidarity Union 



Poland's Parliament for 
mally ended its unprecedented 
experiment in worker 
democracy last Friday, voting 
in a near majority to ban 
Solidarity and to take steps to 
stop future unions from 
gaining Solidarity's national 
power. 

Taken by a display of 
hands, the vote was broadcast 
on the state-run national 
television. Officials said only 
10 members of the 460-seat 
Sejm, or Parliament, voted 
against the new trade union 
law. Nine other members 
abstained from voting. 

The move to ban Solidarity 
came nearly 1 1 months after 
martial law was imposed, and 
the Soviet bloc's only in- 
dependent labor union was 
suspended and most of its 
leaders, includng Lech Walesa 
were imprisoned. The martial 
law has been met with periodic 
riots and protests, and the vote 
was expected to provoke more 
of the same 

There was no immediate 
reaction to the vote from the 
Solidarity underground, hit 
hard by the arrest Thursday of 
its leader Wladyslaw 
Frasynuik. 

General Wojciech 
Jaruzelski, the Communist 
Party and government chief 
who declared martial law last 
December 13, applauded 
quietly after the 
Parliamentary vote. There was 
little visible response from the 
deputies. 

An informed government 
source said Jaruzelski planned 
to speak Saturday when 
Parliament reconvenes for the 
last day of the session. The 
source added that Jaruzelski 
"might offer a few sweets." 
No other details were 
available. 





The report brought 
speculation that the general 
might announce a further 
easing of martial law, but 
other government officials 
said that Jaruzelski did not 
intend to lift the military rule. 
He previously said however, 
that he might do so before the 
end of the year. 

In Washington, a State 
department spokesman said, 
"We deplore the action and 
we're looking at our options." 
the Reagan Administration 
has made it clear that 
outlawing Solidarity would 
worsen already bad U.S.- 
Polish relations 

Lane Kirkland, AFL-CIO 
President said, "In outlawing 
Solidarnosc, the Polish 
government has broken its 
solemn compact with the 
Polish people... 

By replacing Solidarnosc 
with a fragment local union 
structure. ..the Polish 
government has laid bare its 
intention of depriving 
Poland's workers of any voice 
in the nation's economic and 
political life. It has thus taken 
Poland another step down the 
road to misery ad social chaos. 

It was not clear how the vote 
affects Walesa, the Solidarity 
national chairman who has 
been interned since martial law 
was declared. Many other 
union leaders also remained in 
internment, while others have 
been released after signing 
loyalty oaths. 

The new law gives workers 
the right to strike, but restricts 
it severely and bans walkouts 
in the case of natural or 
economic emergencies. 
Unions for the military and 
police are not allowed and any 
labor organization deemed to 
be haboring anti-government 



activists 
deregistered. 



would be 



Week Nights 
7:00-9:15 



THERTBE/ 352-5109 570 Front 



Saturday & Sunday 
2:00-4:15-7:00-9:15 



It'll lift you up where you belong. 



RICHARD 
GERE 

DEBRA 
WINGER 

AN 
OFFICER 
AND A. 
GENTLEMA N 

l STARTS FRIDAY*) |R| 




The head of the Unification 
Church, Sun Myung Moon, 
plans to unite more than 12 
thousand people into some six 
thousand married couples next 
week. 

A church spokesman in 
Seoul, South Korea said that it 
will be the largest mass 
wedding in the history of the 
world, with couples from 83 
nations being married, in- 
cluding 150 couples from the 
United States. 



Schafly Aims At LoveBug 



Conservative leader Phyllis 
Schafly is taking a direct aim 
at the "Love Bug," genital 
herpes. 

Miss Schafly's Eagle Forum 
is distributing leaflets saying . 
(hat the best way to avoid the other." 
sexually transmitted disease is An official 
to avoid sex. 



The pamphlets that Eagle 
Forum is distributing are 
aimed at teenagers and they 
advise: "Remain a virgin until 
you marry, marry a virgin and 
icmain faithful to each 



Belushi Grand 
Jury News 

An attorney for Cathy 
Evelyn Smith, the woman 
who's believed to be the last 
person to have seen comedian 
John Belushi alive says she 
doesn't plan to testify before a 
grand jury probing the actor's 
death. 

The grand jury is in Los 
Angeles, where Belushi died of 
a drug overdose on March 5, 
and Smith's lawyer, Hilton 
Davis, says that his client is in 
Toronto, where she plans to 
stay. 

Smith was quoted in a 
"National Enquirer" article as 
saying that she gave Belushi 
his last drug dose. She later 
said that she was misauoted 



of Planned 
Parenthood, in reaction to 
these comments called the 
advice, "not realistic in 
today's world." 



The festivities in Seoul at 
also going to be massive. T| 
church spokesman says tW 
the entire ceremony will talc 
three days. 

Film Makers 
Hand Over Scripi 

Makers of the film 
"Twilight Zone," say tha 
they will hand over a scrip 
and drawings sought by ol 
ficials investigating th 
helicopter crash that killa 
actor Vic Morrow and tw 
children. 

A lawyer said his client! 
agreed to comply with 
federal subpoenas after 
federal judge said he woull 
review the confiden 
material. 

Morrow and the two chil 
actors died during the filminj 
of a Vietnam War battle sceB 
in July, in California. 



The Current Sauce 
House Rules 

1. All stories, letters, pictures, etc. 
must be turned into our office no 
later than Thursday at 1 2 noon. 

2. All stories, letter, etc. must be 
typed. 

3. We will not print anything that is 
turned into our office after deadline 
unless the story hasn't happened 
before Thursday noon. 

4. Office hours M-W-F, 9-10, T-TH, 11- 
12,T-F, 1-2 (other times also 



We Can Help Make A 
Convert Out of You... 




...The K-2-8 

In this world of ever-dwindling 8-track tape selections, 
there is a device that makes the transition to cassettes 
much less painful (and expensive). The K-2-8 lets you 
play cassettes in your 8-track machine so that you can 
start collecting cassettes without junking your player or 
your 8-track tapes. Then when you're ready to make the 
final leap and buy a cassette deck for your car...we can 
help you there, too. 

University Sounds 

University Shopping Center 
352-8077 



Kozol cont'd... 



October 12, 1 S>S2 . Current Sauce, page } 

Robert and Cameron 



Continued from Page 1 

decade has witnessed sinking 
transformations within public 
school systems, and many of 
the reforms were directly 
related to the philosophy of 
and the contributions made by 
"free schools" of the late 
1960"s. 



Home" Opens 
Tonight 

Samm-Art Williams' ac- 
claimed romantic drama, 
"Home," opens tonight, Oct. 
12, for four performances in 
the Student Union Building ai 
Northwestern. 

The .University Theatre of 
Northwestern is presenting the 
play, which will continue 
through Friday in Room 320. 
Performances area at 7:30 
p.m. ; 

Nan ■ L. Stephenson, 
assistant; professor and 
director jof the University 
Theatre, is directing "Home," 
which will also be NSU's entry 
in the Louisiana College 
Theatre Festival competition 
Oct. 20-23 in Ruston. 

Vincent Wfilliams 111, senior 
theatre-speech major from 
Natchitoches, has won the 
lead role of Cephus Miles in 
the production, which deals 
joyfully with the coming of 
age of a young black man 
from rural South Carolina. 

Williams has been 
nominated by Northwestern 
for the Irene \ Ryan Acting 
Scholarship that will be 
awarded at the American 
College Theatre Festival's 
Region VI competition in Ft. 
Worth Tex., in November. As 
a nominee, he will be observed 
and evaluated during his 
Performance as Cephus Miles 
at Ruston. 

. Playing opposite Williams 
ln the character roles of the 
fwo women in his past will be 
Junior journalism majors 
Linda Verrett of Natchitoches 
and Daphne DeVerger from 
Manv. 



urrent Sauce 




A Great Way, 
To UUrap Fish' 



He notes in his latest book 
that "in several cities which 
have recently been subject to 
desegregation orders, the 
school boards have been 
turning to the personnel and 
pedagogic breakthroughs of 
the 'free schools' in their 
hectic efforts to bring more 
than racial equity but 
heightened excellence as well 
to the public systems." 

Thus, he explains, three of 
the four alternative schools in 
Boston explored in the 
original volume "no longer 
exist, but leaders from these 
alternative education groups 
have become important 
figures in the public school 
system as a whole." 



HostKNWD's "Sundries 



W hen they first invaded the 
air waves over six years ago, it 
was called the Bill and Neil 
Show and they had to hand the 
microphone back and forth to 
each other. "It was a bit more 
primitive surroundings then," 
says Neil. When they returned 
Wednesday evening, it was 
called Sundries, but it was si ill 
hosted by the same Bill and 
Neil. Their complete names 
are Bill Robert and Neil 
Cameron and they are English 
instructors at Northwestern 
State University. 

The program, called 
Sundries can be heard every 
Wednesday evening at 6:00 
p.m. on KNWD and it is a 




'talk' show of sorts. A general 
topic will be discussed and the 
phones will be opened up to 
the listening audience. The 
topics range from the long pay 
lines in the Student Union to 
Sex and Violets, violence being 
too messy. According to 
Robert, callers may 'call in 
any pertinant, legal, pithy, 
pointed questions or ob- 
servations." "And if the 
observations are interesting," 
added Cameron, "we may 
even put them over the air." 
"And claim them as out- 
own," injects Robert. 

They refer to the program as 
a resuurrection of the old Hill 
and Neil Show, since they 
believe they are sitting in the 
same squeaky chairs. But 
things have changed lor the 
belter in the last six years. 
Instead of having a floor 
microphone hanging from the 
ceiling, ihev now sit com- 



fortably across from each 
other with a microphone ol 
their own; no more handing 
the microphone back and 
forth. According to KNWD 
Program Director Paul Rino, 
this makes the program flow 
much belter. "They play off 
each other so well, this system 
makes it much more en- 
tertaining." With KNWD's 
new control room, noi only 
are the hosts more com- 
fortable, but when I he 
listeners call in, ihey can be 
put right over the air and 
they're able lb speak with 
Cameron and Robert directly. 

The program i is called 
'Sundries' ("look' it up," 
suggests Robert) and it can be 
heard every Wednesday 
evening al 6:00 p.m. on 91.7 
KNWD. It is a general topic, 
audi e n c e par t i c i p a I i o n 
program. You wiU be en- 
tertained. 



Be a life saver for the aged 
week (Oct. 11-15). 

Donate 25* to any Sigma Kappa and 
receive a Lifesaver lollipop. 

All donations will be used to fund a national 
gerontology project for Sigma Kappa 
sorority. 



Neil Cameron 





1 1 



Organizations that did not turn in a Renewal Card 



Amencan Chemical Society 
Association of Computing Machinery 
Chess Club 

Dance Repeitoty Company 
Esprit 

Giaduate Student Association 

Kappa Delia Pi 

Karate Club 

LDS Institute 

Mu Alpha Theta 

NAACP 

Natchitoches Northwestern 
Symphony 



NSU Collegiate 4 H Club 
Phi Beta Lambda 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Political Science Society 
Public Relations Student 

Society ol America 
Roses of Sigma Tau Gamma 
Sigma Delta Chi 
Society of Physics Students 
Spli './Image 
University Players 
Young Republicans 



Bill Robert 



Until further notice these organizations will be considered on 
inactive status. All right and privileges granted to chartered 
organizations are lifted. 



SGA Legal Service 
Free Legal Advice 

Every Wed. From 

2-4 in the SGA 
Conference Room 

Call 357-4501 for 
an appointment or details. 



Causey's 
Pharmacy 

Welcomes all NSU 

Students 
Shop our Specials 
and Save 

GO DEMONS 

407 Bienville 352-3141 



- - — - ■'- 



— . 



Opinion 



Censorship Is An Unhealthy Thing 



Isn't Life Profound? 

Isn't life profound? Have you ever really just laid back and 
watched it go by? Do you ever wonder how our environment 
came to be? Not just the natural environment, but the 
manufactored environment as well. 

Have you ever just sat in your room and stared at the carpet? 
When you look down at your shag rug and see all those millions 
of little shags standing straight up; have you ever wondered why 
they all just don't fall down, or at least lean over? It's mind 
boggling. 

What about your plastic alarm clock/radio? Where does the 
plastic come from? Of course, rubber bands come from rubber 
trees, but have you ever seen a plastic tree? 

And speaking of your radio, how does that little box that sits 
beside your bed, with no antennae, pick up sounds from 
Shreveport and Alexandria? Isn't it amazing that radio waves 
can pas undetected (by the human ear) through our body while a 
small plastic box with no ears can not only pick it up, but 
transfer it back to us? 

Have you ever thought about pictures? They are very in- 
trigueing. I've often wondered ho I can just be engaging in 
normal life functions and someone with another plastic box with 
a round glass lens protruding out can take my picture, and 
suddenly-whatever I was doing at the time is transferred to 
paper. You can be running down the street, Life passing on 
either side of you, and somebody snaps a picture, and. ..POOF!, 
an instant in time, one microsecond in the legions of eternity, is 
stopped, and preserved forecver. Incredible. 

And speaking of instances in time being preserved, how about 
(hat human brain. Volumes and volumes have been written 
about the human brain. But still, no one can understand it. 

When a thought goes through your brain, what does it look 
like? What makes you see or hear a particular thing once, and 
remember it all of your life? And by the same token, why can 
you study (lie same thing over and over and over and still not 
remember il the next day? 

How can the brain store up so much information? Think of 
all the things that you know. We build computers that are now 
capable of storing a million bits of information. Think about 
what you know. Think about the experiences that you have had. 
If you were to recite all of them, it would take you years. 

What makes one person smarter than another? Our brains are 
basically the same size. How come your I.Q. is 210 and mine is 
.11 What makes you so smart? 

And another thing. When people say that someone has alot of 
nerve; I've always wondered what nerve actually is. What is 
nerve? Is it tangible? Obviously not. The last time that I 
walked through the Biology Building they didn't have any 
pickled nerve. They had pickled snakes, pickled frogs, and 
pickled bugs, but no pickled nerve. Why do some people have 
alot of nerve and some people have virtually none at all? 

Isn't it amazing what kind of things that you can think about 
and wonder about if you would just stretch your brain and your 
imagination little bit? Isn't life profound? 



Editor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 

Co-News Kdilor 
Barbi Hall 

Co-Focus Kdilor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Kditor 
Susan Arthur 

Staff Reporter 
Marva Mo\e> 



Advertising Manager 
Alison Breazeale 

Co-News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Dianna Gratton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
l^sa Halley 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern Stale 
University in Natchitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter al 
ihe Natchitoches Posi Officer under the act of 
March J. IH79. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is 357-5456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches, Louisiana 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters 10 the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
teller for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana, 71457. 




John Hess is a syndicted 
columnist of the United 
Feature Syndicate 



"Without censorship, 
things can get terribly 
confused in the public 
mind. " 

Gen. William Westmore- 
land 

I'd like to write a column 
about R-p-t-r magazine, 
but, frankly, I've lost my 
nerve. 

What brought it up was an 
item in the New York Times 
about the naming of a new 
director for Radio Liberty in 
Munich, which used to be 
run by the CIA. 

It said this fellow G B- 

— , once an intelligence offi- 
cer during the war, was edi- 
tor of R-p-t-r magazine, 
which it said "secretly 
accepted CIA money for 
several years before it 
closed in 1968." Of course, 
the Times spelled the names 
out. but I don't dare. 

The very next day, the 
Times ran a correction. It 
said it wasn't true that the 
CIA subsidized that maga- 
zine. It did not say how it 
could be so sure. 

R-p-t-r was a lively 
magazine, which published 
investigative pieces on do- 



mestic affairs — I wrote a 
few of them myself — and 
also heavy cold war stuff 
from abroad. Its Paris and 
Rome correspondents — E- 
m-d T— 1-r and Cl-r- St— 1— 
g — lived well and kept 
things chilly indeed. Cl-r- is 
still scaring the heck out of 
us these days with her theme 
that all terror comes from 
Moscow. 

In its last years, one I-v-g 
K~st-1 transferred from 
Encounter magazine in 
London, which was a CIA 
progeny, to be editor of R-p- 
-t-r. But the magazine fold- 
ed. Coincidentally, this 
occurred shortly after reve- 
lations about CIA activities 
on the cultural front. I-v-g 
went on to become a guru of 
the superhawk set. 

The idea has got around 
over the years that R-p-t-r 
was a CIA front — hence, 
the Times's boo-boo. This 
would be interesting to 
explore, because the maga- 
zine was propagandizing 
Americans. It would be one 
more case where our intelli- 
gence service was manipu- 
lating the news and interfer- 
ing in our domestic politics. 

But I don't dare say any 
more because a new law 
promoted by President 
Reagan makes it a crime to 
name an undercover agent. 
And Lord knows what other 
violations I might commit. 

Even if I should escape 
that peril, there is the threat 
of libel action. Not that I'd 
libel anybody, but somebody 
might think I had. 

Consider the $120 million 
suit filed by Gen. Westmore- 
land against CBS, in Green- 
ville, S.C. I guess Westmore- 
land is more popular than 
Mike Wallace in Greenville. 



It's about the Vietnam 
war. Through all history, no 
general ever lost a war, and 
this one is no exception. He 
won the war, but the media 
and politicians threw it 
away, That's his story. 

A CBS special said no, the 
brass lied about how the war 
was going. Nothing new 
about that, but CBS went 
further: It said the brass lied 
to President Johnson, too. 

In truth, I don't think 
that's so important, but 
Westmoreland thinks it's 
worth $120 million. 
Although CBS offered him 
15 minutes of prime time to 
reply, he insists on cash, as 
matter of salutary disci- 
pline. 

Considering the behavior 
of the courts in recent cases, 
I wouldn't bet he'll lose. 
Some judges, among them 
Chief Justice Warren 
Burger, just don't like the 
media. 

Some juries feel the same 
way. The verdict against the 
Washington Post in the 
Mobil case made no sense at 
all, except as a confused 
slap at the messenger who 
brings so much bad news. 

CBS sticks to the main 
point of its story, though it 
admits it was sloppy to some 
degree. But even if it wins, 
its defense will cost it plen- 
ty. More than I could afford, 
so I'm laying off saying any- 
thing that might offend any- 
body who has the price of a 
lawyer. 

Which is a form of censor- 
ship, you might say. But as 
Westmoreland put it, with- 
out censorship, things can 
get terribly confused in the 
public mind. 

Copyright, 1982, 
United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Editor: 

With regards to the Fair 
Nominees (Current Sauce, 
October 5), Commissioner of 
Elections, Harlan Harvey, 
should be commended for 
conducting this election 
without incident or con- 
troversy. This is a rare event 
indeed. 

As I recall, past com- 
missioners have been accused 
of everything from nepotism 
to racism, not to mention 
being accused of bias and 
ballot stuffing. Current Sauce 
stories revealed in details of 
scandal, incompetence, and 
rule interpretations suited to 
the morals of whoever was in 
office. 

Apparently Mr. Harvey has 
transcended all that. Or else 
the Current Sauce has. 
Whichever, rumors and 
inuendoes persist. Perhaps the 
Current Sauce could spearate 
fact from fiction in the 
popular talk of KNWD's State 
Fair Nominee not making last 



Wednesday's ballot. I'm 
curious. Is this true? 
KNWD sponsored somebody? 
The same rumor has it that he 
did receive enough 
nominations to make the 
court. 

Assuming this is true and 
Gary Meinhart willing, what's 
the scoop? The potential 
implications are quite grave or 
quite humorous. Like, how 
might this relate to equal 
opportunity and sex 
discrimination? Or the other 
nominees? Or Southern 
macho idealism? 

In matters of this import, 
surely a story, if not a laugh or 
two, exists. By sponsoring a 
male nominee, KNWD has 
stepped forward with a display 
(albeit humorous) of student 
involvement not usually seen 
in these times of student 
apathy. Perhaps Harlan 
Harvey should commend 
them. 

Sincerely, 
Dave Stroud 



Mr. Stroud; 

The rumor about Mr. 
Meinhart is indeed quite 
humorous, nay, hilarious. To 
my knowledge, their has 
neither been a confirmation or 
denial about the nominations, 
except to say that Mr. 
Meinhart's name did appear at 
least once. 

However, this is all totally 
irrelevant since the NSU 
election code specifically states 
that to be on the State fair 
Court (or the Homecoming 
Court) the candidates must be 
regularly enrolled women 
students at NSU. 

I applaud KNWD for their 
attempt at curbing some of the 
student apathy. The idea was 
novel, to say the least. But 
could you really imagine one 
of our SGA members, for 
instance. Dean Napoli, 
escorting Mr. Meinhart across 
midfield at Independence 
Stadium" To say the least, it 
would put NSU on the map. 
but which map 



I 



October 12, 1982. Current Sauce, page 5 



Commentary 



The Anatomy of A Research Proposal, or 
Hey, Mom, Why Are You Still In School"! 



By: Madge Autumns 

The Great Halls of Learning 
beckoned and she came 
running--not at a fast "clip" 
perhaps, but with unmatched 
enthusiasm. Returning to 
school was exhilerating and 
everything was coming up 
violets (or is it roses?). 
After the long, hot summer 
the degree of zest lessened 
somewhat. She blamed it o'n 
the positive ions in the air. 
Psychomotor skills diminished 
considerably, and sometimes 
even the cognitive skills 
refused to "cog." (Yes, Virgil, 
there is such a word. Web- 
ster's Third New International 
says so with nine definitions.) 

A month's vacation or 
respite-depending upon who 
is reading-and she rushed 
back "on hobnailed boots." 
(Hunter: 8) She would learn 
how to do a research proposal! 

She marveled at the 
tremendous undertaking. 

The potential researcher, 
between bouts of dif- 
ferentiating among concepts, 
constructs, and variables, 
began gathering precious 
information for the study. 
Everything she read propelled 
her on toward more and more 
exciting literature. She could 



no longer stop reading and 
once had to be coaxed out of 
her favorite niche by the stacks 
of dissertations at library 
closing time. Piles of books, 
journals, and other sources 
accumulated on the desk, 
under the desk, and clothed 
her room from wall to wall. 

And so it came to pass after 
many days (and nights), she 
was seeking information on 
educational tests and 
measurements. The entry 
referred the reader to (1) 
avaluation, (2) examinations, 
(3) ^narking systems, (4) 
statisticalmethods, and (5) tests 
and stales. 

She proceeded dutifully 
"evaluation" which directed 
her to four other entries in- 
cluding "education— evaluat- 
ion!" Randomly selecting 
"rating scales," the reader, 
upon reaching that entry, was 
referred to (1) observation of 
teaching— tests and scales, (2) 
self evaluation ( sic ), and (3) 
teacher rating scales. 
Nearing collapse but not ruled 
by obsession, the reader tiled 
"teacher rating scales," which 
AGAIN directed her to 
"observation of teaching- 
tests and scales." 

No believer of the "He also 



serves who only stands ana 
wails" philosophy (Milton: 
13), she attacked the page 
bearing the entry, "ob- 
servation of teaching. . . ." 
There was no definition, no 
"see also"; there was only a 
blank space. 

In "quiet desperation," 
(Thoreau: 30), she approached 
the reference librarian and 
requested an explanation for 
this "unnatural" 
phenomomenon . The 

knowledgeable lady told her 
that "all descriptors do not 
necessarily supply reading 
information, but perhaps by 
referring to . . ." she would 
encounter that for which she 
was looking. 

All of this and she had not 
yet begun writing Chapter 
Two. 



Footnote: The writer 
acknowledges the importance 
of the bibliography for 
substantiating quotes but is 
unable to furnish one at this 
particular time (and will not 
do so even at a later date 
except under duress). The 
rough draft was somehow 
forgotten at home last 
weekend as a marker in one of 
her recipe books. 



Drunk Driving Worse Than Ever 



David Gunderman, four 
years old, was run over as he 
stood on the sidewalk waiting 
•or an ice cream. His killer, 
*ho had eight prior con- 
actions ranging from hit and 
run to drunk driving, was 
sentenced to five years in 
Prison. 

Paul Lawler, fifteen years 
was crushed against a wall 
*"en a drunk drove off the 
Highway. His killer was on 
jobation after three prior 
runk convictions and is 
eligible for parole in July after 
s ervi ng two years in prison. 
September 30, 1982, two 
nreveport residents were 



Sh 



'"ed in a car accident on 
highway l South ouside of 
^tchez. Mr. and Mrs. David 
a le rriman were hit head on by 
t Lafayette woman whose 
Uc k crossed the center line of 
" e highway. The woman, 
^in critical condition in 



an Alexandria hospital, was 
charged with two counts of 
negligent homicide and 
D.W.I. Mr. Merriman had 
just retired and the couple had 
started on a vacation. 

In the last two vears more 
Americans have been killed by 
drunk drivers than were killed 
in the Vietnam War. On the 
average at least three 
Americans are fatally injured 
and eighty are injured by 
drunk drivers every hour of 
the day. Safety experts claim 
that oneoutof two Americans 
will be victimized by a drunk 
driver every hour of the day. 
Safety experts claim that one 
out of two Americans will be 
victimized by a drunk driver in 
his lifetime. This is hardly- 
surprising when the NHTSA 
(National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration) 
contends that up to ten percent 
of all drivers on weekend 



nights are legally intoxicated. 

Undoubtedly, you are 
thinking to yourself that this 
has nothing to do with me or 
Natchitoches. Think again. 
The next time you are out on 
the highway and want to 
party, remember the fine in 
Natchitoches for D.W.I, is 
$398.50 and two days in jail or 
four days public service. It 
has also been proven that 
alcohol is a major factor in 
three fourths of the traffic 
accidents and fatalities in 
Natchitoches Parish. 

Alcohol is a major epidemic 
and Americans are outraged 
and want to put and end to 
this carnage. Already, twenty- 
seven state legislatures have 
passed their own version of the 
toughest drunk-driving bills in 
the nation and more 
legislation is pending in 
others. Furthermore, twenty 
states have boosted the legal 
drinking age to twenty-one. 



Draft Registrars See 
Registration Failing 



Draft registration isn't 
working, according to some of 
the non-registrants undergoing 
or awaiting prosecution. "The 
Government... can't possibly 
prosecute us all," said Ben- 
jamin H. Sasway of Vista, 
Calif. Sasway was the first 
indicted for non-registration, 
and the second to be 
prosecuted. 

"The trials arc just a 
desperate move to intimidate 
people into turning themselves 
in and compromising their 
moral and religious beliefs," 
said Russell Martin, another 
draft resister, who was 
registered against his will by a 
U.S. attorney in Iowa. "A 
lew people are being crucified 
by an agency thai refuses to 
admit defeat," 

The General Accounting 
Office's latest figures show 
over 700,000 non-registrants. 
This is more than 20 times the 
entire population of Federal 
prisons. The overall com- 
pliance rate with registration is 
93 percent, according to 
Selective Service. This is well 
below the 98 percent Selective 
officials have said must be 
reached for the system to be 
considered fair and effective. 
Even at the height of the 
Vietnam war, compliance with 
draft registration never fell 
below 98 percent. 

The current prosecutions 
will raise the issue of illegal 
selective prosecution, said 
Martin. "I'm going to be 
prosecuted not because 1 
didn't register for the draft, 
but because I publicly pointed 
out the failure of the program 
and the aggressive loreign 
policy behind it," he said. 
Maritn was re-elected this 
spring as student body 
president of the University of 
Northern Iowa, in Cedar 
Falls. 

"(Draft registration) is a 
political law designed to force 
people into supporting policies 
that they would not support 
otherwise. It has nothing to 
do with national security," 



said Martin, ''Non- 
registration forces a debate on 
foreign policy." 

Other non-registrants agree. 
For them, noii-registration in 
an act of conscience. "Draft 
registration is preparation for 
war," said Russell F. lord. 
Who was imprisoned before his 
trial when he refused bail. "1 
am not willing to sign my life 
over 10 ihe Government that 
b r o u g h 1 us Vict n a m . 
Watergate and t he Trident 
submarine. | am j, ol 

willing io withhold my 
protest... until the nuclear 
arms race has reached its 
logical conclusion in a nuclear 
holocaust...! am defending a 
view thai wars, like poverty 
and prison, are neither 
necessary nor inevitable. They 
transgress the human spirit 
and ought to be abolished," 
he said. 



Letter... 



Dear Ldiloi : 

I would like lo respond to 
the letter last week concerning 
the Demon mascot. I feel the 
Demon is a very entertaining 
character and his duly is lo 
entertain the bored fans 
during hall lime. 

To the very lew per sons who 
were offended by I he aclions 
of the Demon mascot, I would 
like to extend my sincere 
regrets. On the other hand, to 
Ihe many who have enjoyed 
the performance of I he Demon 
mascot; be looking lor more 
unusual, unexpeclcd, and 
most of all, entertaining 
actions. 

I have narrowed ihe 

, complaint of the angry student 
down lo jusi a pure case of 
jealousy. I feel the complaint 
was supported by few and was 

I childish. 

The Great Demon Mascot 



'KNWD 1 



PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE - OCT 13 Oct 19 

Wednesday 6:00 pm Sundnes General topic talk program 

with listener call in. Hosted by Neil Cameron and Bill Robert 

Topic: NSU The Good, Bad, and The Ugly. 

9:00 pm Retro Rock Live George Thorogood 

1 1 :00 pm Concert Dream One hour of Electric Light Orch 

Thursday Regular Progressive Music Programming. 

Friday Regular Progressive Music Programming. 

Saturday 8:00 pm Regular progressive music Programming 

Sunday 1 0:00 pm Mellow Music Wake up 

1 :00 pm Comtempory Christian Music Program 

3:00 pm The Jazz Conneciton 

6:00 pm Rolling Stone Magazine Continious History of Rock and 
Roll featuring the British Invasion. 

7:00 pm Seventh Day featuring seven albums played in their 
entirety. 

Monday 9:00 pm Concert Dream One Hour of Rusi, 
1 1 :00 pm International Music Program 
Tuesday Two in a Row All Day Long 



Current Sauce, page 6, October 12, 1982 



Organizations 



Kappa Alpha 

The Gamma Psi Chapter of 
Kappa Alpha Order, would 
like lo announce their Fall 
pledge class officers. They are 
as follows: John Norrid, 
President; Ed Martin, Vice- 
President; Steve McQueen 
Treasurer. 

The K.A.'s pledge class will 
be washing the windows at the 
Lemee House which is a 
historical home featured on 
the Natchitoches tour of 
homes. Also during the lour 
of homes, the brothers will be 
selling Mint Julips at Beau 
Fort plantation. 

Friday night we held our Big 
Brother-Little Brother 
campoul. The purpose of (his 
outing is loo promote a spirit 
of camaraderie. We wish lo 
report that it was a huge 
success. The actives would all 
like thank the pledges for the 
swimming lessons also. 



Phi Mu 

Ladybug congratulations go 
out to Kris Gregory NSU's 
newest Phi Mu Active and to 
Cindy Duke, our September 
active of the month! 

Phi Mu had its annual 
retreat and thanks go to Sheila 
Stewart for planning it for us. 
It was great! Thanks to Anna 
Hill for letting us use her camp 
for the "festivities"! 

The Phi Mu Ladies had a 
window wash this past week at 
Antoons and at Maggios. The 
Lady bugs raided $111.00 for 
project H.O.P.E. thanks to 
the good work by Cindy Ernst 
our H.O.P.E. chairperson. 

Phi Mu wold like to an- 
nounce the annual PHI MU 
ROCK A THON will be held 
on October 15th. The girls 
will be asking for pledged 
donations this week. All 
proceeds will go to H.O.P.E. - 
please be generous! ! ! ! 
M 



Periakoti 

The NSU Periaktoi Club 
held its first meeting of the 
semester September 28, at 7:00 
p.m. Periakloi's advisor, Mr. 
Malcom Broadway welcomed 
new members to the club and 
highlighted some of 
Periaktoi's past ac- 
complish merits. 

New officers were elected 
and are as follows: President, 
Donna Ingram, Vice 
President, Christine 
Schroeder, Secretary, Janice 
Denison, Treasurer, Bonnie 
House. Elected lo the 
Outreach Committee were 
Deborah Burleigh and Carol 
Bourne. 

The Periaktoi Club is the 
official club for Sociology, 
Social Work and Law In- 
forcement Majors. 

Panhellenic 

The NSU Panhellenic 
Council met Wednesday, 
October 6, 1982. Marti 
Williamson, President 
presided. David Nardini was 
guest speaker to inform the 
council on the Special 
Olympics and abut the seeking 
of children's sponsors. 

The council discussed the 
fund raisers, the progressive 
supper, the high school 
relations project, the 
Christmas Festival, and Rush 
evaluation results. An- 
nouncements of individual 
sorority fund-raising activities 
were also made. 

Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta chapter of 
the Delta Zeta Sorority held an 
informal meeting o Mon., 
October 4, 1982. Items 
discussed were; the 
Panhellenic Progressive 
Supper, fund-raisers, the fall 
dance, upcoming elections, 
Founder's Dav, and State Fair 
Week. 



State Fair 
Tickets 

Tickets on sale today 
through Friday, October 22, 
at 12:00 noon, at the 
Fieldhouse. All students 
must have ID. No tickets will 
be issued without the ID. 



PRSSA 

The NSU Chapter of 
PRSSA held its meeting on 
Thursday in room 21 3 Kyser 
Hall. 

The new officers were 
elected they are: President, 
Stephanie Hall; Vice 
President, Veronica Wolf; 
Treasurer, Scott Cox; 
Secretary, Angie Row; 
National Delegate, Charlene 
Elvers; and P.R. Director, 
Angelita Police. 
Congratulations! Good luck 
for a successful year. 

Members of PRSSA will 
attend a seminar on Saturday, 
October 16, 1982 at LSU-S. 
NSU'S own Mr. Presson will 
give the introductory speech. 

Anyone interested in Public 
Relations, no matter what 
your major is invited to attend 
our meetings. 



Chi Alpha 



Chi Alpha in the greek 
means "Christ sent ones." On 
NSU's campus it means 
christian fellowship Monday 
nights at 8 p.m. in room 236 of 
the Student Union. 

This coming Saturday, 
October 16th. There will be an 
October Escape to Alexandria. 

Any interested person is 
welcome to come along on this 
day of fun and fellowship. 
(Mall, minaiure golf, lunch, 
bowling, zoo and park). 
Transportation will be 
provided, we will be leaving 
the rear parking lot of the 
Student Union at 9 a.m. and 
returning at 5 p.m. Just bring 
yourself, some cash for your 
activities and. ..ESCAPE 



Wesley 



Hello Demons! Here is just 
a little reminder about our 
upcoming activities here at 
Wesley. Tomorrow evening 
we are holding our regular 
Wednesday night supper at six 
p.m. — there will be no 
scheduled program due to 
mid-term exams. Also, do not 
forget our rummage sale this 
Saturday from eight a.m. until 
one p.m. We would ap- 
preciate any help or donations 
for this project. 

Come join us for Sunday 
evening worship at six p.m. 
and Tuesday prayer breakfast 
at seven a.m. Our retreat will 
take place on October 29-31 at 
Camp Istrouma, cost will be 
ten dollars per person. 

So long for now Demons 
and good luck with your 
exams! 



Sig Tau 

The Northwestern chapter 
of Sigma Tau Delta, the 
National English Honor 
Society, is reactivating its 
membership. All English 
majors/minors and all English 
Education majors/minors are 
invited to join this prestigious 
organization. Through the 
local and the national group, 
and through publication in the 
Rectangle, the national 
literary magazine, members 
have the opportunity for 
recognition, scholoraships, 
and awards. Bring your ideas 
for programs that you want 
established at NSU to the first 
meeting, Wednesday, October 
13 at 12:00 noon in Dr. 
Christine Ford's office, Dept. 
of Languages, 3rd floor Kyser 
Hall. 



Tri-Sigma 

Tri-Sigma is especially 
proud of Susan Arthur, Eileen 
Haynes, Kim Arthur and 
Debbie Vela on being elected 
to the State Fair Court. We are 
also excited to announce Lesa 
Hatley as the new freshman 
senator, Donna Jo as the new 
sophomore senator and Susan 
Johnson as the new junior 
senator. We know these girls 
will serve their class as well as 
they serve Tri-Sigma. 
Congratulations Sigmas; 

This year the competition 
better look out-because our 
football team is tough and 
rugged. They just had a 
victory over Chic Jeans and 
nothing can stop them now; If 
you have not bought your 
tickets for the chance to win 
$25 worth of gas-don't worry 
you still have another week, 
the drawing will be the 25th of 
October. 

TKE 

The Epsilon Upsilon 
chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
has been busy this past week. 
In intraumural flag football, 
they got off to a slow start but 
came back against Sig Tau 
Gamma for their first win. 
The team is looking forward 
to the rest of the season. In 
the pool tournament, several 
Tekes participated with Marty 
Guillory advancing tothe semi- 
finals. 

They have several upcoming 
events in October. One an 
exchange with one of their 
neighbors-the Delta Zetas and 
also their annual retreat with 
the new pledgs. A road trip to 
the McNeese game is planned 
for the weekend. 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 

OFFER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you re an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMYNURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



SUGB Positions Filled 



October 12, 1982, Current Sauce, page 7 



Highlighting the October 
4th meeting of the Student 
Union Governing Board was 
the election of the Director of 
the Lady of the Bracelet 
committee, Representative At 
Large. Fine Arts Chairman, 
Second Vice President, and 
the appointment of a new 
Program Editor. 

June Johnson was elected 
the new Lady of the Bracelet 
Director, Dwanda Smith was 
chosen as the new 
Representative At Large, 
interim Fine Arts Chairman, 
Lisa Williams was elected to 
remain in that position, as was 

v 

Artist Corner 
To Feature 
Reed and 
Bohannon 

Two local artists, Sue Reed 
and Susan Bohannan, will be 
featured at this month's 
"Artist corner" that began on 
October 11. The show is 
designed to give local artists a 
chance to display and sell his 
or her work. A variety of art 
is on exhibit at the show in- 
cluding oil and water pain- 
tings, pottery and stained glass 
work. 

Mrs. Mildred Lee, director 
of the show, hopes to present 
showings at least once a month 
throughout the year. She 
encourages anyone who is 
interested in displaying his or 
her work to contact her. 

The shoe is located in the 
Cammie Henry Room on the 
third floor of the Watson 
Library and will run for two 
weeks. The exhibition will be 
°Pen Monday thru Thursday 
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. The exhibition is 



interim Floyd James, who will 
remain as Second Vice 
President. Deanna Grau was 
appointed by President Alicia 
Haynes as new Program 
Director. 

It was also announced that 
the opinion poll run in the 
Current Sauce revealed that 
students would be willing to 
pay a small admission fee to 
see a concert, if the concerts 
were "big name" artists. 
Some of the suggested per- 
formers were Alabama, Statler 
Brothers, Rick James and the 
Gap Band. 

Floyd James announed that 
the non-student ticket price 
for the Ronnie Milsap concert 
would be $10 in advance and 
$13 at the door. Students will 
set in free with their NSU ID, 
but they must go by and pick 
up their tickest in the office of 
the Director of the Student 
Union. 

On November 3, the SUGB 
wll sponsor a disco. Deacon 
Jones will provide the music. 
It will start at 8:00 in the 
Student Ballroom. NSU 
students will be admitted for 
no charge with I.D. 



When You 're A Mother, Returning 
To School Is Like One Big Juggling A ct 



"When you get married and 
say your wedding vows, 
there's no guarantee that says 
your husband is going to live 
forever. My husband had a 
heart attack in 1980," says 
Mrs. Beth Montano, a native 
of Fisher, Louisiana, and a 
first semester sophomore 
majoring in Nursing. "1 
realized then I couldn't put the 
kids through school". 

"When he was sick, we 
talked about my coming back 
to school. With a college 
degree, 1 could support the 
family if someday he was 
incapable of working, and if I 
never even used my degree, it 
would still be there for me." 

Beth chose to pursue a 
degree in nursing because "it 
is a field where there will 
always be a need. I was 
already a registered EMT 
(Emergency Medical 
Technician). I didn't realize 
my husband would be my first 
patient." 

Entering college for the first 
time is a confusing enough 



Potpourri Staff Accepting 
Pictures For Student Gallery 



The POTPOURRI staff is 
now accepting pictures from 
NSU students for publication 
in a Student Gallery section of 
the 1983 yearbook. 

Deadline for submiting 
pictures is Nov. 26, according 
to Ed Dupuis, editor. 

The photos submitted for 
possible publication "must be 
black-and-white of high 
quality and artistically 
pleasing, size 3x5 inches or 5x7 



He said the photos must be 
turned in to him in the 
POTPOURRI office, Room 
227, Kyser Hall, along with 
pertinent information such as 
the owner's name and address, 
and the name of the person 
who shot the picture. 

"We will give credit in the 
book for each of the students' 
photos that we use," Dupuis 
said. 

The POTPOURRI cannot 



inches. Of course, they also guarante return of the 
must be acceptable editorially photographs, whether they are 
of the book, too," used in the book or not, the 



as part 
Dupuis said. 



editor said. 



experience for a student just 
out of high school, but it is 
even more so confusing if one 
has been out of high school for 
18 years. 

"I had this complex when 1 
entered. Are the younger kids 
going to accept this older 
woman coming back to 
school? 1 was really 
paranoid," she admits.. She 
found that the students did not 
resent her at all. In fact there 
was a learning experience 
between the two age groups. 
She has helped students in 
classes in which she was more 
familiar "like Psychology and 
Sociology. Since I'm older 
and have been around longer, 
I understand the different 
types of people and their 
behaviors. They helped me in 
areas where I was unfamiliar- 
like math." 

She claims her real em- 
barassment came, however, 
when she asked her son to help 
her with her homework. 
"That's the ultimate crush," 
she laughs. "He knew a 
bunch of shortcuts that they 
didn't teach over here." 

Being a wife, mother of 
two, and a college student is 
"like one big juggling act," 
according to Beth Montano. 
"You have to be careful so 
you don't gel bogged down 
with school and forget your 
number one priority, which is 
your family." Her oldest son 
is a freshman at Florien High 
School and is on the band and 
the basketball team, so there 
are "games and parades I have 
to go to. There will be a game 
one night and a big test the 
next day. You ask yourself: 
do I go to the game or stay 
home and study?" 

Household duties become 
community property. 
Whoever gets to the washer 



first loads u up. We have a 
system of equal rights. My 
dishwasher does not say: For 
Female Hands Only," she 
says. "Everybody pitches in - 
- whoever gets home first 
starts dinner." Even the first 
grader is taught to pick up her 
clothes and make her bed. 

"You know how in 
Orientation 101 they tell you 
the best environment for 
studying. It would literally 
blow their minds if they knew 
that I study while loading the 
washer, defrosting the 
refrigerator, and listening to 
my child say her ABC's while 
another child is practicing his 
trombone and Daddy is 
watching a baseball game." 

IRS Assists In 
Registration 

The Internal Revenue 
Service is helping Service to 
enforce registration. In mid- 
August, IRS mailed warning 
letters to an initial 33,000 
suspected non-registrants born 
in 1963, said Roscoe L. Egger 
Jr., Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue. These names were 
drawn from a list of 250, 000 
names IRS found by checking 
its files with Selective Service 
lists of non-registrants. Egger 
said IRS planned to mail 
notices to the others, and later 
provide up to 200 names to 
Selective Service. These, he 
said, "will be selected on a 
random basis" from those 
who fal to register after 
receiving warnings mailed by 
IRS. 



Dear Students: 

Below are the new standards for "good standing and 
satisfactory progress" effective Fall 1982 for continued receipt 
of financial assistance at NSU. 

A student must have an overall 2.00 GPA in the four major 
subjects (English, Math, Social Science, and Social Studies) in 
order to be in "Good Academic Standing" to qualify for financial 
assistance as a Freshman. To continue receiving financial 
assistance a student must make satifactory acsademic 
progress. This calls for a student to maintain a 1.50 GPA the 
first year in college. The second year a student must maintain a 
175 GPA. After the second year the student must maintain a 
2.00 GPA to continue receiving financial assistance. If a 
student fails to maintain the required GPA (in order to continue 
receiving financial assistance), he or she will not receive 
financial assistance for the following semester. The student 
must make a 2.00 GPA and enroll in the same number of hours 
as the previous semester in order to make satisfactory progress 
and receive financial assistance the following semester. 
Transfer Students 

Transfer students are required to comply with the above 
standards of satisfactory progress in order to receive financial 
assistance at NSU. 

Time Limits on Financial Aid Eligibility 

A student may receive financial aid for a maximum of five years 

(10 semesters) in order to complete a four year degree program. 



From the 
Registrar's Office... 

1 . The repeat rule is effective starting in the spring semester. 
This rule means that the second grade will count as the linal 
grade. On your transcript, a line will be typed throught he 
course that has been repeated and a "R" will be placed in the 
left margin by the course. 

2. II a student fails to satisfactorily complete a developmental 
course in 3 attempts, the student will be permanently 
suspended from NSU. (Reading 98 99 1 00; Math 100; English) 

3. When a Freshman or Sophomore receives excessive 
unexcused absences (10% of total classes) the instructor may 
recommend to the student's academic dean that the student be 
withdrawn frpm the rolls of that class and given the appropriate 
grade. (10% of MWF classes 5 days absent, and 10% of T-Th 
classes is 3 days absent) 

Read The SAUCE for info on Pre Registration. 



What Do 

YouJMean 




You Don't Read 
The SAUCE ? 



RESEARCH PAPERS 



Improve your grades' Rush $1 00 for the 
current. 306 page, research catalog. 1 1,278 
papers on file, all aca lemic subjects 
Research AsHistance 1 1322 Idaho Ave.. 
«206W. Los Angeles. CA 90025 (2131 
477-8226 




Current Sauce, page 8, October n ma? 




Dr. Robert Lee 



Dr. Robert Lee 
Gives Free Help 



"We teach our students to 
play games, to have 1'un, and 
we educate them, but we do 
nothing to help Ihcm to cope 
with reality," says Dr. Robert 
C. Lee, director of Counseling 
and Testing. 

"The previous ad- 
ministration didn't deal with 
the psychological well-being of 
the students because (hey had 
other priorities and they didn't 
care," he added. 

Dr. Lee came to Nor- 
thwestern in 1976. NSU had 
what he was looking lor; 
testing service, counseling, 
administrative work and a 
chance lor growth. Dr. Lee is a 
licnesed psychologist having 
gotten his PhD. from the 
University of Wyoming. 

When he came here there 
were two other counselors, 
some graduate assistants and 
some counselors in the dorms. 
He is not the only counselor 
here other than a few in the 
dorms. 

The Counseling and Testing 
Department located in Room 
101 in Caldwell Hall, offers a 
variety of services. Besides 
administering the more 
common tests, such as the 
ACT and PSAT, they also 
administer a variety of tests to 
aid graduating students. 

Among some of these are 
Teacher Certification test, law 
school entrance exams, and 
medical school entrance 
exams. They also offer tests in 
foreign languages... They 
don't generally offer skills 
tests such as typing, short 
hand or the hand coordination 
test that factories use. These 
test are usually conducted by 
the U.S. Employment Service. 



Some of the counseling 
services they offer are for 
stress, anxiety, personal 
problems, test anxiety, 
depression, attitudes, and 
career choices. They can help 
you in almost any problem 
you might have though. 



WILD 

WEEKEND 



This Friday, Saturday & 
Sunday Only! 
9 pm - 2 pm. 

The Domino's Pizza 
Late Night Special 

The tastiest items on your 
pizza is yours free on any 2-itern 
pizza, with coupon. 

As always, 2 free cups of 
Pepsi with any 1 2" pizza, 4 free 
cups with any 16" pizza, are 
yours just ask! 



DOMINO'S PIZZA DELIVERS 




Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 1 1 am - 1 am 
Fri. &Sat. 1 1 am - 2 am 

To use Domino's Pizza 
coupons, please write your 
name, address and phone 
number on the coupon, and 
present it to the driver when 
your pizza arrives, hot and 
fresh, at your door. 




Free 

Ground Beef 



Free on any 
1 2" 2-item pizza 
One coupon per pizza 
Good aft»r 9 pm only 
October 15. 16 and 17 

Fast, free delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



• o 

/ OS 

• | Q Q. 



352-6382 

601 Bossier St. 
I 

Free 

Ground Beef 

Free on any 
1 6' 2-item pizza. 
One coupon per pizza. 
Good after 9 pm only 
October 15. 1 6 and 17 

Fast, free delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Telephone: 352-6382 



0S 
=H -< 

a! in 

m I on. 



October 12, 1982, Current Sauce, page 9 



Denims 
and 
Diamonds 

Is Back! 

With an all new sound all new 
dance floor and video. 

No Club is Comparable 

C/Royal Chevis J.D. Turkey Bar Brands 

2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 Only 1.75 

All sorority girls and college girls celebrate your b irthday 
at 

Denims and Diamonds 

We will provide free champagne and pay for your cake. 
Bring your decorations and be ready to celebrate! 

Also 

Ralley in the Alley is Back!! 

Denims and Diamonds wants to party with the Demons 
on State Fair Weekend. Fun and games are coming on 
October 23. Watch this ad for further information. 
The party place in Shreveport!! 



415 Spring St. (Next to the Square) 
318-949-9695 



Sports 



Ctirrcill Sauce, page 12, October 12, 1982 



Cowboys Ease By Demons 22-11 



Roger's Voice 

By Roger Reynolds 



Dr. Joseph Orze began this 
week accepting applications 
lor i he position of head coach 
lor the 1983 season. Current 
members of the Demon staff 
were also encouraged lo apply 
l or I he posi . 

The university's council will 
do the screening of applicants, 
interview the finalists and 
sbmii a recommendation on 
filling the job. All this should 
be done by late November, 
when a new Head coach is 
expected to be appointed. The 
NSU President staled, 'This 
will enable the new coach and 
his stall lo conduct a suc- 
cessful recruiting program 
before the February signing 
dale. 

Orzc also stated, 'Current 
staff members applications 
will be seriously considered. 
The NSU President recognizes 
ihc advantages of selecting a 
head coach from within the 



system. The main advantage 
is, the coach will already know 
I he talent he has returning for 
next year. 

He said, 'Because our goal 
in football is superiority, we 
will seek a superior head 
coach, and the on(y way lo 
determine which i of the 
nation's outstanding coaches 
might be available for the 
position is lo accept ap- 
plications.' \ 

Orze also said, 'It is 
comforting to realize, thhat 
there arc highly-qualified 
assistants on our own staff 
who could probably meet our 
goals and standards.' 

When asked about the 
position of Athletic Director 
and head coach, Orze 
said, 'will be separied, but the 
immediate concern is for the 
head coaching job, so he, can 
assume the position at the.end 
of (he season.' 



McNecse Cowboys took ihc 
measure of the Demons this 
week by a 21-11 score. The 
Cowboys were lead by 
freshmen tailback Flip 
Johnson, who carried the ball 
1 1 times for 95 yards and one 
touchdown. McNeese's best 
back Butch Jordan carried the 
ball 17 times for 86 yards and 
two touchdowns. The 
Cowboys rushing game 
pentrated the Demon defense 
for 280 yards rushing and 
quarterback Stephen Starring 
had six completions on eleven 
attempts with one interception 
for 71 yards passing. 

The Demon offense 
sputtered all night long, as all 
three Demon quarterbacks 
played and combined for a 
total of 283 yards on 52 at- 



tempts with 22 completions 
and two interceptions for one 
touchdown. NSU's rushing 
game was held in check, 
picking up a minus eight yards 
on 22 attempts. This includes 
a 19 yard centersnap over 
punter Leo Clement's head. 
The Demon game plan for this 
week was to pass the ball, but 
either NSU receivers could nol 
hold on to the ball or the 
quarterbacks could nol get the 
ball to them. 

The only bright spot for the 
Demon's all night was the 
running back of kickoffs and 
punt returns by speedster Roy 
Fontenot, who had three 
kickoff returns for 102 yards. 
Roy put the Demon's on their 
40 yard line, three times with 



kickoff and punt returns, but 
NSU failed to move the ball. 

Head Coach A. L. Williams 
was quoted after the game, 
'McNeese beat us. No excuses, 
our defense was not agressive 
enough, also we had poor 
tackling techniques and the 
kicking game needs im- 
provement.' Coach Hubert 
Boale's said about the 
Cowboy victory, 'It was a 
good team victory. The team 
worked together to do what 
they had to do.' The Demons 
record now goes to 4-2 while 
McNeese's record is 2-4. 
Northwestern plays Alcorn 
State at home this week. 
NOTE: The Demons go a 
win, when Angelo State had to 
forfeit because of an illegal 
player. (See related story) 



The flag-football season got 
underway two weeks ago with 
teams competing in four 
divisions. 

The women got started as 
UnKappa 5th number one beat 
Tri-Sig 13-0 thanks to 65 yard 
touchdown run by Laura 
Waguespack. In the second 
game of the day U.K. 5th 
number iwo had to go into 
overtime to take a 14-6 victory 
over Phi Mu. The game was 
tied 6-6 after regulation time 
had expired. Angela Lasyone 
scored the only Phi Mu 
touchdown, while Tuandra 
Lewis scored both U.K. T.D.s. 

Zoom took a close 18-12 
win from Kingpins with a two- 
touchdown effort from Gerald 



Demon Playground 



Burton to zoom off with a 1-0 
record. James Davis scored 
three T.D.s to lead the Jocks 
to a lopsided 34-0 win over 
BSU. 

Kappa Sig's number one 
team beat Theta Chi 25-6 as 
Mike Brown scored two 
touchdowns while Scott Sledge 
and Randy Bonnnette con- 
tributed one apiece. 

The next day the Sig Dog's 
number two team took a 
narroow 7-6 victory away 
from TKE. The Sigs took a 7- 
lead in the first half on a Tod 
Klotzback touchdown and a 



Steve Allen extra point catch, 
before TKE attempted to 
come back with a score by 
Pete Adams, but fell short 
when the point after failed. 

Yang's first team took the 
field against Rapides Kights 
and trounced them 39-0. Yang 
used a real team effort as 
Donny Harrison, Steve Roe, 
Joe Bienvenu, Joe Cun- 
ningham, Robert Delrie, and 
Dean Napoli all scored 
touchdowns. 

Conine scored with 12 
seconds left on Bobby 
Waddell's second T.D. of the 



Demons Add Win 




The Northwestern 1982 
football record improved to 4- 
1 on the season last Wed- 
nesday afternoon when 
Angelo State announced that 
it forfeit its 26-17 win over the 
Demons. 

The Rams were forced to 
forfeit their first two games of 
the season after discovering 
that an ineligible player was 
used in the first two games of 
the season. The player did not 
play in the non-conference win 
jver Alcorn State. 

Lone Star Conference 
President Gerald Robins made 
the announcement, saying that 
defensive tackle Mark Baker 
did not fulfill the Lone Star 
Conference gradepoint 
requirement. The an- 
nouncement came after 
Angelo State reported the 
incident to the conference 
office while preparing its 
conference eligibility list. 

"My reaction is the same as 
it was when we walked off the 
field after that game," said 
Northwestern State Coach 
A.L. Williams. "We got beat. 
I think it would be different if 
it was a conference game, or 
even if it would make our 
record 5-0. But we did not win 



the football game on the field 
and that's what our players 
have to look at." 



Demon's Host Alcorn 



The Alcorn State Braves 
move into Turpin Stadium this 
weekend to play the Demons. 

Alcorn will be coming off a 
close game with Tennessee 
State in which they won. The 
Braves will be playing without 
the services of their top 
quarterback. Alcorn is known 
for its huge physical size and 
strength. 

Northwestern comes into 
the game after a very poor 
showing against the Cowboys 
of McNeese State in Lake 
Charles. The Demons should 
have all three quarterbacks for 
this weeks game. NSU brings 
into this game a strong passing 
attack, but a rushing game 
that is suspect at this time. 
Maybe this week against the 
Braves the defense and offense 
can put their games together 
and get ready for the State 
Fair contest, next weekend 
against arch-rival Louisiana 
Tech. 



★ Porker Picker Panel ★ 



This 

Week's 

Games 



NSU vs 
Alcorn St. 



LSU vs 
Kentucky 




Roger 
Reynolds 



NSU 
14-lJ 



LSU 
27-17 



Baylor vs 
Texas A and M 



Illinois 
vs Ohio St. 



Lamar vs 
La. Tech 



Maine vs 
Massechussettsl 




John 
Cunningham 



NSU 
31-21 



LSU 
27-13 



Texas A and M] Texas A and M 
21-17 24 _ 14 



Ohio St. 
31-14 



La. Tech 
35-24 



Mass. 
21-14 



Notre Dame 
vs Arizona 



Standford 

vs USC 



Tulane vs 
Southern Miss 



Alfred vs 
Hobart 



Season 
Record 



Notre Dame 
28-10 



USC 
17-10 



USM 
24-14 



Hobart 
24-14 



25-15 
.625 



Illinois 
21-14 



La. Tech 
31-21 



Maine 
28-10 



Notre Dame 
21-14 



Stanford 
24-14 



USM 
35-20 



Hobart 
63-7 



24-16 
.600 




Alison 
Breazeale 



NSU 
35-24 



LSU 
24-21 



Texas A and M 
28-21 



Illinois 
17-16 



La. Tech 
38-17 



Maine 
27-21 




Joe 
Cunningham 



NSU 
31-28 



LSU 
31-6 



Texas A and M 
17-16 



Illinois 
17-16 




Mark 
Thigpen 



NSU 
31-20 



LSU 
27-14 



Texas A and M 
24-17 




Vera 
LaCour 



NSU 
21-14 



LSU 
24-10 



La. Tech 
21-14 



Maine 
27-21 



Notre Dame 
24-21 



Stanford 
35-28 



USM 
21-10 



Hobart 
28-0 



23-17 
.575 



Notre Dame 
17-14 



Stanford 
21-17 



USM 
28-7 



Hobart 
56-28 



26-14 
.650 



Ohio St. 
20-14 



La. Tech 
27-13 



Maine 
24-14 



Notre Dame 
21-13 



USC 
24-21 



USM 
21-17 



Alfred 
17-10 



28-12 
.700 



Bavlor 
14-7 



Texas A and M 
21-17 



Ohio Si. 
21-17 



La. Tech 
24-14 



Mass. 
28-24 



Arizona 
21-10 



USC 
28-14 



USM 
35-24 



Alfred 
21-20 



24-16 
.600 




Larry 
Hall 



NSU 
14-13 



LSU 
27-17 



Ohio St. 
31-14 



La. Tech 
35-24 



Mass. 
21-14 



Notre Dame 
28-10 



Porker Picker Panel Disbanded, Rebanded, In Same Week 



For the second week in a 
row, the regular members of 
the Current Sauce Porker 
Picker Panel failed miserably 
in selecting games for the 
week. 

Not a single regular member 
managed to stay even in his (or 
her) picks, and the only 
Panelist to break .500 was 
guest selector Dwanda Smith. 
Dwanda had a 6-4 record for 
the week to win an all expense 
Paid trip, furnished by the 
SGA, to the power plant. 

The records were so bad last 
week that sports Editor Roger 
Reynolds refused to disclose 
the results at his weekly press 
conference following the SGA 



meeting last night, until he had 
time to "officially" check 
them. The SGA, ever mindful 
of truth in reporting, 
demanded that Reynold's 
disclose the records of the 
panelists. 

Reynold's protested on the 
grounds that by publising the 
final results of the ten games 
played last week, irrepairable 
damage would be done to the 
already sparkling image of the 
Current Sauce. This comment 
brought a loud round of 
laughter, sprinkled with little 
applause from the partisan 
crowd of senators. 

Joe Cunningham, the only 
returning letterman on the 



P.P. staff, announced a 
practice pick for this Thursday 
after his Sociology class. The 
staff will predict high school 
. games for next week. 

John Cunningham an- 
nounced that he would not 
stoop so low as to predict high 
school games. Cunningham 
said that he finished predicting 
high school games in his senior 
year at Natchitoches-Central, 
when he finised tied for first 
wth a sterling 34-76 record 

Alison Breazeale, who has 
lingered almost near the top 
for most of the year, said 
absolutely nothing all week to 
anybody. She cited laryngitis 
as the reason for her silence. 



At least, that's what she said. 

This week, the P.P. staff 
has three new and seemingly 
intelligent members of the 
NSU student body picking 
games. Among them is Vera 
LaCour who was recently 
elected to the State Far Court. 
Also picking is Larry Hall the 
SGA treasurer who prom- 
mised to apropriate some 
funds for the P.P. panel 
should he win this week's 
picks. And finaly, Mark 
"Kingin" Thigpen, the only 
man to successfully ruin an 
independent organization, the 
year after it won the all- 
campus championship. 



October 12, 1982, Current Sauce, page 1 1 

More 

Demon Playground 

day to take a 13-12 triumph 
over Brotherhood. East 
Rapides also took a 13-12 
decision over 10 Blind Boys 
thanks to scores by both Dave 
Smith and Darryl LaCaze. 

Susan Prince scored twice to 
lead VIPs to a 27-0 routing of 
Chic Jeans. Melanie Moore 
chalked up two T.D.s as 
Odyssey defeated Sigma 
Kappa 13-12. On Thursday; 
however, Odyssey fell ai the 
hands of U.K. 5th number Iwo 
44-6. Stephany Washington's 
four touchdowns enabled 
U.K. to raise t heir record to 2- 
0. Tri-Sig scored twice to take 
a 12-6 decision from Chic 
Jeans. Phi Mu dropped to 0-2 
on the season as U.K. 5th 
number one drilled the 
Ladybugs 58-6. Julie Cassell 
paced U.K. with five T.D.s. 

KA took a 21-12 victory 
over Theta Chi as Neil Evans 
lead the way with iwo 
touchdowns. The Sig's first 
team increased their record to 
2-0 as they got the best of TKE 
40-13. Again Mike Brown 
paved the way for the Sig Dogs 
as he scored three times. Jeff 
Lechman, Randy Bonnelle, 
and David Webb each added a 
touchdown to help in the 
cause. 

In other action, Waller 
Pinkston propelled the 
Steelers past Yang Two 3-6. 
Theta Chi got their first win as 
they came back from a 7-0 
deficit to beat Kappa Sig 
number two in overtime 21-20. 
The score was tied 13-13 at the 
end of regulation. The Sigs 
go! first ball in the overtime 
period and scored on four 
plays, but it look Theta Chi 
only one play to score the 
deciding point. 

The Sig's first team; 
however, had no problems in 
their contest as they crushed 
Sig Tau 51-0. For the third 
time in as many games, Brown 
lead all scorers with three 
T.D.s. David Deville had two 
T.D.s, while Roger Reynolds 
and Jeff Lechman added one 
apiece. In other games, 10 
Blind Boys came out on top of 
Rapides Knights 14-13. 
Brotherhood fell for the 
second time as the Jocks took 
an 18-12 triumph. 

In the women's division, 
Lynn Clary scored twice to 
guide Phi Mu to a 20-6 
conquest over Chic Jeans. 
Tandra Lewis contributed 22 
points, and Stephany 
Washington added 12 as U.K. 
5th whipped VIPs 36-12. 

On Thursday the Rapides 
Knights took a 39-12 decision 
over Kingpins, thanks to a 19 
point performance by John 
George. Yang used a strong 
second half performance 
which saw them score 29 
points to destroy 10 Blind 
Boys 35-0. Joe Cunningham 
paced all scorers in the contest 
with 14 points. 



use 

17-10 



USM 
24-14 



Alfred 
31-21 



23-17 
.575 



Caldwell Hall Destroyed In Late Night Blaze 



A devastating fire, ap- 
parently starting somewhere in 
the basement of Caldwell Hall 
late last night, leveled the 
building that had been 
standing since 1912. 

Fire engines from all over 
the parish were called in to 
light the fire which started at 
about 10:15. Firefighters 
battled futility for hours, 
against the never ending blaze 
that destroyed several hundred 
thousand dollars worth of 
personal belongings, records, 
memories, and history. 

One fireman was taken to 
the Natchitoches Parish 
Hospital shortly after arriving 
on the scene, the victim of 



smoke inhalation. The 
fireman was not believed to 
have been seriously injured. 

At one point an obviously 
nervous and scared crowd who 
were within 200 feel of the 
blaze, shouted frantically at a 
fireman who seemed engulfed 
in the blaze from the top of his 
(ruck. Screams of "gel him 
out of there" however, were 
lost in the roaring fury. A 
minute or two later, the fire 
truck was pulled back from 
the blaze, and with it, the 
fireman who was still pouring 
water on lop of the building. 

The fire engine acted just in 
lime, when, not more lhan two 
minutes laier, a lame chunk of 



the building collapsed, right 
where the firemen and the fire 
truck had been only moments 
be lore. 

After determining thai the 
building was going to be 
completely lost, firemen 
turned their attention to 
saving the historical columns. 
Firemeri s al on the ground 
with the hose pointed toward 
the columns and continued a 
steady spray. As of press lime, 
I he columns appeared lo be 
safe. 

The loss lo the school and 
l he students was a devastating 
one, but perhaps even more 
devastating was the personal 
loss that so many teachers and 



administrators fell. Personal 
records, plaques, awards, and 
personal libraries, worth 
thousands of dollars in a 
strictly monetary sense and 
priceless in the personal sense, 
were gone in a short amount 
of lime. There wasn't time lo 
save anything. One report 
slated that $100 thousand 
worth of baby grand pianos 
were lost in the fire. Ironically, 
those pianos were scheduled to 
be moved today. 

Another irony is thai the 
only things left standing by 
Caldwell in the aftermath of 
the fire were the historical 
three columns, which were the 
only survivors of a lire lhai 



destroyed Caldwell Mansion 
in the early l9(M)'s. 

According officials at the 
fire, the blaze probably either 
started in the west end 
basemen I or the center 
basement. When the fires 
leached the lop of the 
building, a .south wind may 
have saved Warren Lasion 
elementary school from being 
the second victim in the blaze. 



Sheriff Norm T'letchci 
complimented the actions of 
the siudenis saying thai they 
acted very well, and clidn'i 
pose any hazard to the 
firemen. 




Vol. LXX No. 9 



urrent 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




auce 




October 19. 1982 




ie middle section of Caldwell Hall collapses in the blaze that ripped 
through and leveled Caldwell. Fortunately the historical columns, pictured 
at the right, escaped without serious damage. Photo h\ Ant'rv Davis 



NSU Gets Red Measles Scare 



Bv Lisa Williams 

Slate Health Department 
^' 'icials from across the slate 
ou/zed Northweslern, La, 
lc ^n, and LSU in an effort to 
nal1 a potential Red Measles 
fP'demic that threatened NSU 
last week. As of press time, the 
Problem has apparently died 
* nd the threat of spread of 
«ed Measles is all but gone. 

A Baylor University girl, 
•objected to, and eventually 
°niracting Red Measles had 



contact with mosi of the 
members of Phi Mu sorority at 
an October I "Big Sis-Little 
Sis" relreal just outside of 
Natchitoches. The girl, a 
former resident of Nat- 
chitoches, and and now a 
student in Waco, Texas, was 
in town visiting friends al the 
time. 

When she relumed to 
Baylor, she became sick with a 
case of Red Measles, and il 



was at Uus point t hat all the 
local attcnttOn came to light. 
Stale Health Department 
officials called people in 
Natchitoches and determined 
exactly who had been exposed 
to the girl. Twenty-six 
members of Phi Mu were 
asked to return home on 
October 1 1 because of their 
exposure. Several other NSU 
students, as well as one from 
La. Tech and LSU were also 



contacted by the Health 
Department and urged lo "gel 
home." 

According lo Dorsey 
Wilmaiih, cdiloi of Bayloi \ 
campus newspapei , I 1 1 1 
LARIAT, an epidemic of Red 
Measles has been al Bayloi 
since around September 18. 
The disease is believed lo have 
been broughi Id Bayloi by a 
student who was a missionary 
in the Honduras this summer. 

When the news of (lie 
Bayloi coed's illness i cached 
ihe Health Department of- 
ficials, i hey immediately 
reached I he Phi Mti's and had 
members sign a lisi al iheif 
October 10 meeting, staling 
"whether or not I hey were al 
Hie relreal and if they talked lo 
the girl (the Baylor student)", 
according lo Deanna Cirau, an 
NSU Phi Mu. 

Deana addded," The lisi 
went io i he Natchitoches 
Health Unit who checked ihe 
student's records and those 
who had not received Measles 
inoculations were asked lo 
'not go to class - leave town 
until Monday, which was 
October 18 (yesterday)." 

Some siudenis who had 
received ihe Red Measles 
inoculation were still asked lo 
leave campus, however. 
According to NSU Registrar. 
Dr. Austin Temple, " The 
problem with this is thai some 
siudenis were modulated 
before their first binhdays. 
Three or four years later, 
doctors found that thai shot 
was not effective when given 
lo children under one year 
old." . 

Temple said I hat there were 



four categories of Phi Mti's 
those who hail only been 
inocluutcd before then liisi 
birthday, those inoculated 
a f liei iheii first birthdays, 
I hose who have nol been 
uioctiited al all, and those who 
lutve previously had Red 
Measles." 

An I SI I student had a dale 
with I he gij I on ihe nighl al lei 
ihe Phi Mu retreat, anil a I cell 
siudciii, as well as several 
other, NSU siudenis, were 
around Ihe couple mosi of the 
nighl. I he I SI I siuileni, and- 
i he I ech si udcii! w ere 
determined nol lo be 
susceptible lo the Reil Measles 
and alter initially -being asked 
lo leave the school, ihe LSU 
siuileni was quickly rciaslaled. 

Since ihe liisi outbreak of 
measles at Bayloi, 5,800 
siudenis oui of an ap- 
proximate total of 10, MM) have 
been inoculated. Wilmaiih 
said thai inoculation units hail 
been sei at various points 
around campus lo make 
inoculations more easily 
accessible. As ol October 5, 
Dorsey said, there had been 
"26 confirmed cases ol Red 
Measles, 28 suspected cases, 
and 21 probable cases." 

I hefe were also a lew cases 
reported inncaby coinmuniiv 
colleges and three cases in hiidi 
Continued on Page 3 

SGA Game 

On Wednesday night Ihe 
Northwestern SCiA will travel 
lo Louisiana Lech to play their 
SCiA in a game of flag 
football. Last year NSU won 
Ihe game 48-7. 




October 19, 1982. Current Sauce, Pace 3 

Unemployment Up, Hope For Jobs Down 



Abortion Discount Cause Problems 



The United Telephone Co. 
last Thursday said it regretted . 
issuing Yellow Page direc* 
tories containing a coupon 
entitling the bearer to a $25 
price reduction tor an 
abortion at a Lima medical 
clinic. 

"It has been embarrassing 
to us," said United's com 1 
munications manager, . John 



l.andsberg. "We've learned a 
valuable lesson. We apologize 
to any customers who were 
offended." 

The abortion coupon was 
among several coupons 
contained in the directories, 
distributed to 5 5,000 
customers in the Allen County 
area '. - ■'. . 



Some of the furor over the 
latest unemployment figures 
has died down, but the fact 
remains: more than 1 1 million 
eligible workers can't find jobs 

The situation may seem 
bleak, at best, but it's far from 
hopeless, at least according to 
Richard Hill, a spokesman for 
the National Association of 
Personnel Consultants. 

To those people who are 
unemployed. Hill says there 
are unfilled jobs available 
right now. Most of these jobs 
are tucked away in the 
classified ads. The problem is, 
he says, finding the right job, 
and the person whose skills 
match it. 



finding a job today is 
definitely not the way it used 
to be. Workers may have to 
settle for a pay cut, learn new 
skills, or to enter a new work 
field all together. 

Hill says all workers, 
especially those now unem- 
ployed, should consider 
training for jobs that will be 
needed in the future. For 
unskilled workers, one area to 
look into might be computer 
m aim e n a n ce . College 
Students should consider 
engineering. 

Hill recommends looking 
toward the future. You must 
try to get by today, while 
Irainiim for better times down 



the road . 

Losing a job. Hill says, is 
much like losing a relative. 
There arc certain stages ro BQ 
through, depression, anger, 
denial. He recommends 
getting through all that as 
quickly as possible. 

And, to the jobless, he urges 
that when you do begin the 
process of finding work, make 
sure you realize the hunt is 
going io lake some lime. Ii 
cquld take two or three 
months, or more, m find 
desirable employment . 

HOME 



Red Measles cont'd 



Continued from page I 

school districts. There have . 
been no cases reported by any 
other schools in the Southwest 
Conference, of which Baylor 
is a member, thus voidng 
speculation that exposure to 
the measles at football games 
would lead to other outbreaks.. 

Wilmarth also said that the 
Baylor epidemic was ap- 
pearing to be getting "under 
control". 

The epidemic that caught 
Baylor by surprise, has been 
virtually prevented here at 
NSU. According to Temple, 
Red Measles is "pretty serious 
with young adults." Red 
Measles makes a person 
susceptible to other- diseases 
like encephalitis." 

Jo Hargis, a nurse at the 
Nachitoches Health' Unit said 
that Red Measles is'contracted 



Doctors Say Women Review «> 
Needlessly Worried 



from a carrier "during the 
incubation period, which lasts 
from seven to 14 days." The 
disease is not contracted from 
someone who already shows 
symptoms - of the disease, 
"high fever, rashes, and 
feeling quite sick," Nurse 
Hargis said. 

As Of this writing, no NSU 
sludents have come down with 
Red Measles. The stuents who 
were asked to leave school 
should all have returned 
yesterday (Monday) which was 
a full .18 days after their initial 
exposure to the disease. 

"The girls were very 
cooperative," Dr. Temple 
said, and he added, "We've 
contacted . all of their in- 
structors and they won't miss 
any classes." 



A group of physicians say 
that many women have lumpy 
breasts, but that calling their 
condi t ion " Fibrocystic 
Disease" causes t he women io 
worry needlessly about breast 
cancer. 

Dr. Susan Love and other 
physicians in Boston published 
their report in this week's 
"New England Journal of 
Medicine." Their report says 
there's no link between 
clinically lumpy breasts and 



Love explains that when a 
woman is found lo have lumps 
in her breast lissue, she is 
diagnosed as having 
"Fibrocystic Disease." Bui 
she claims the term is so 
frightening that some women 



ask lor mastectomies io 
prevent breast cancer and their 
p h v s i c i a n s s o m e I i m e s 
recommend the surgery. 



The report says half of all 
women have lumps in their 
breasts and 90 percent have 
microscopic evidence ol 
"Fibrocystic Disease." 



Love says that if 90 percent 
of the women have it, it's not a 
disease. She says her team 
would like to eliminate use of 
the term entirely, and instead 
jusi call the condition 
"Lumpy Breasts." 



The production "HOML" 
opened night in the Student 
Union with great success. 

Vincent Williams 111, a 
senior i heal re-speech majoi 
from Natchitoches did an 
excellent job of portraying 
Cephus Miles. Williams put a 
great deal of emotion into (he 
character. He made the 
audience feel as if they were a 
part of Cephus Miles. You 
wanted lb laugh with him 
when he laughed and cry with 
w hen he Crycd. 

Linda Verrctl of Nat- 
chitoches and Daphne 
DeVerger of Many did an 
extraordinary job of sup- 
porting Williams. They 
played all of the characters 
needed other than Cephus. 
Linda Yen el/ also plaved 
Pani Mae, Cephus true love. 



Prince Andrew Phone Home 



^ORTH-F^ 




630 Youree Drive 



Shreveport 



797-3776 




With any meal receive one bottle 
beer of your choice — FREE! 

Featuring Seafood and Deli 
Soups, Sandwiches, and Salads 

Mon.-Wed. 11-9 Thurs.-Sat. 11-10 
FOR A GREAT PLACE TO EAT DURING STATE FAIR 
OR ANYTIME —TRY THE DELI!! 



Britian's 22-year-old Prince 
Andrew is back in England, 
alone. He cul short his 
vacation with soft-pom movie 
star Koo Slark, alter a group 
o f r e p o r 1 e r s a It d 
photographers nosed their way 
into his Caribbean Island 
hideaway of Musik|iic. British 
news reports say the Prince 
left the journalists in the lurch, 
taking over the plane they had 
chartered io leave the island. 

Photographers on the scene 
didn't have it loo good either. 



I hey didn't gel a single shot ol 
Slark. Editors had to make do 
with pictures of her, more or 
less Slark, of course, from 
some of her erotic mov ies. 

Apparently the goings on 
with the prince shocked British 
proprieties, and reportedly 
raised a furoi with Queen 
Elizabeth. Buckingham 
Palace reports thai flic 
decision lo leave Miss Slark 
and the island was entirely the 
Prince's. 




CAR 
STEREO 



, U/V> 

JpKlr SALE 



Jensen Triax I $ 90 
' ~ : -\ Jensen Triax II *125 
$S5L Pioneer KP 2500 $ 133 
S^Swi Pioneer KP 5500 s 1 68 



Royal Sound RS 900 $ 66 
Installation provided. 
Don't miss these specials. 
Call Jay at 357-0984. 



Opinion 

Currcni Sauce, Page 4, October 19, 1982 



What Is This Double Digit Inflation 



Late last night, Northwestern lost something that it can never 
replace. Caldwdl Hall burned to the ground. Not even an army 
of fire engines and l ire trucks could prevent the historic building 
from crumbling beneath the deafening blaze of that tragic fire. 

The loss of Caldwell can't be expressed in terms of money. 
What we lost last night, was more than a part of Northwestern, 
it was a part of everyone who passed through that buildng from 
1912 to 1982. We lost a part of ourselves. We really did. 

I've lived in Natchitoches all of my life. I was born and raised 
on Northwestern, and never seriously considered going to school 
anywhere else. My parents went here, and one set grandparents 
went here. About a year ago, my grandmother gave me her class 
ring from here. The inscription read, "Louisiana Stale Normal 
School". The date was 1919. Almost 70 years ago, my grad- 
mother was my age, and she was walking to and from that 
building, going to class, like I did up until last night. 

That's the same building that I was forever complaining 
about. Too hot, too cold, something was always wrong. For 
some reason, my worst grades were in classes that were in that 
building. But now, the complaining must come to a stop. It's 
shame. I really wish that it was there so I could complain some 
more. I'd been working on some choice complaints for this 
winter. 

The loss is just as great for those not born and raised in 
Nachitoches. I sat for a while with a guy who wasn't from here. 
He had never really been to Natchitoches before he came to 
NSU. But as we sal there, he looked at the building and just 
said, "Unbelievable, all the years, all the history, I wonder how 
many people will ever know just what they are losing now." 

The losses are staggering indeed. Northwestern lost $100 
thousand dollars worth of pianos, alone. The tragic irony is that 
the pianos were scheduled to be moved only tomorrw. 

High School Relations lost key recruiting information. In- 
formation on potential students, contacts, and etc. 

Financial Aid, teacher information, the language center, 
psychology, the Basic Studies records were all in the building. 

Personal libraries worth thousands of dollars (if you can put a 
monetary value to those items), were all lost. Things like that 
will never be replaced. 

One of those people who lost so much. Dr. Richad Galloway, 
Dean of the C ollege of Basic Studies probably put it best. When 
someone asked him, "What arc we going to do?". Dean 
Galloway, watching the blaze eat away his office and personal 
records from years of service to this school replied, "What CAN 
we do?" 

State Fair Schedule 




John Hess 



By John L. Hess 

"Fritz," said Church, 
"what's a digit?" 

This was "at the unem- 
ployment," where Fritz, the 
old shipping clerk, and 
Church, his platform man, 
meet every Tuesday. The line 
was moving slowly, and they 
had been 
reading news- 
papers as they 
waited. 

"A digit?" 
said Fritz. 
"Why, it's a 
li tiger." 

"Then a 
double digit 
must be two fingers, like a 
shot of whiskey," said Chuck, 
slowly. "But I'm not getting a 
lift out of this one." 

"Oh, you mean double-digit 
unemployment. That just 
means the numbers are getting 
bigger." 

Looking at the line stret- 
ching out into the street, 
Chuck growled, "Tell me 
about it." 

"Cheer up," said Fritz. 
"Here's a statmem from the 
Republican National Com- 
mittee that says recovery is 
already here." 

"Arc they sure?" . 
"President Reagan doesn't 
go that far. He says it's arund 
the corner." 

"Sounds familiar." 
"Yes," said Fritz. "Hoover 
said it in 1931." 



Tuesday October 19, 8:00-1 l:00,"Wine 
And Cheese Party", Recreation Complex 
Wednesday October 20, 6:30, NSU vs Tech 
SGA Flag Football (last yr. NSU 41-7) 
Thursday October 21, 7:30, "Burn The Bulldog' 
Bonfire and Pep Rally, Greek Hill 
8:00-11:00, Wreck Tech Party Student Union 
Saturday October 23, 12:00 noon, Rally In 
The Alley , Shreve Square 



State Fair 
Tickets 

Tickets on sale today 
through Friday, October 22, 
at 12:00 noon, at the 
Fieldhouse. All students 
must have ID. No tickets will 
be issued without the ID. 



the simian inttcmfifutti VvsttctuiuHt «,is 
culled looula In Stacy Sutfciil ;ii (ctxip.m. 
I tain N.ipoli mid i he pravvi ittai Don Stacy led 
rtw I'laliic 1M» IVarcc rtunotl id accept the 

n 1 1 mill.'-. Hum tlu- tkiolvi 4 meeiiiic.. IVnv 
\iulcis,.n seconded. Mt'iu'-n passed. \|>seiu 
«eie: Vera I acorn, IVxitHi t imiiiiiulhiiu. 
I>;iwd s.nlois. Unduei I vans, and Robert 
taormcui . 
,(>l I K I K Kl I'OKIS 

.toe Si«itc> mW the senate iliai ihv 
l*ai liuieni.ii> I'ltvcdiue class «ill meei on 
1 nda\ ;u ::U). HC announced lhai we will 
si.ul a Stall' Student Student I obp\ 
OiiMiii/aiion. 

I .11 iv Mall announced thai ihe deadline toi 
lliulevi* is I nda\. Oct. 15. He set iIk' htuiiiei 
Stale 1 ail al "50.00 loi at) cxpcndituies. 

hariati Manes named tin,- State lau Court 
ami Senators. Me said Hun Mr, and Miv, \si 
luMitinaiHMi* itpeR iiHla> .nut cKhc (ii Oct. 25. 
I Ik- elections will be \o\euilvr }. 
t (>\|\|| till Kt POKtS 

Vvl Nieollc. Student Rights, announced 
Htai ihcrt wilt be an an onto in me m.i \ 
(. onieicuee Room on Wednesday tioni 2-4. 
It anyone has a tquil piohleui the sen U*cn are 
1 Kt I and sponsored by i tic St f v 

Dt'iiM.ivi. \wmbl) t tiainnan. announced 
the Speaker .mi \\ educsdav . He also said lhai 
ihe\ bad -i meeting! on Ociolvi 6 and discussed 
the t eeiuici v 

I io\ O.ividsou. Campus lieaiimieaiion. 
siul ihai ihcj «ill h.nca mectiiti! Chuisduv ai 

Kiwi tlcyd. Student I Hfc, told the senate to 
jjo io hear Jonathan ko/ol on Wedncsdas ai 
«*:00. 

Deana (.nan. SI lilt. announced the new 
poMiion* w hieb weie |iM lilted 
\l w Ul SIM ss 

I'ro) Davidson moved to open nominations 
lor Mr. and \ltss NSl . Seoil Repp seeouded. 
Motion passed. Nominated were: Joe 
Staniey. Dean Vipoli. 1 an> Hall. Kristi 
Heyd. Siaev Soilcau. and Cindy Dukc. 

t ro\ Davidson nun cd to approve Slate 1 an 
Court and Senator. Jack Welch seconded. 
Monon passed. 

Hoh Pea ice moved to swear in the new 
senatois. Peir> \nderson seconded. \ Km ion 
pa-sed and Joe Staniey wa< asked io swear in 
the new senaiois. 



"Aw," said Chuck. 
"You're always knocking 
Reagan. Give the guy a 
chance. He's only been in 21 
months." 

"Yep, and already he's give 
us the highest unemployment 
and bankruptcies since 
Hoover." 

"Well, like he says, he can't 
turn it around overnight after 
20 years of Democratic 
misrule." 

"Congress was run by 
conservatives just about all 
that time," said Fritz, im- 
patiently. "But even so, 
Reagan doubled the deficit all 
by himself." 

"Aw, Gwan," said Chuck. 
"Congress votes the budget." 

"It does," Fritz admitted. 
"It gave him all he asked for - 
military buildup, tax cuts..." 

"Then why don't they give 
him his balanced-budget 
amendment?" 

"They ought to call his 
bluff on that one," Fritz said. 
"But it would take so long to 
happen and it's so full of 
holes, tht it wouldn't help us 
any." 

"You're always knocking," 
said Chuck. "Don't you 
believe in a ballanced 
budget?" 

"I sure do. A deficit is a 
rip-off - they print money, 
then sock it to us in higher 
prices. Plus, we've got to pay 
interest on it." 

"Isn't it supposed to give 

SGA Minutes 



\\\<>l \< I Ml MS 

I riiLtx al h:U1 UWrc a I'lT KM I V in 
fntnt of rtw Mmicni Union, iviu /eta 
wiiKiitw Wash l iula>. Noel Nicotic asktid it 
am itpjatn/anuii vnitth] like 10 SfKHMM a chtyd 
in ilk- Special Olympic*, li interested eoniaci 
I >as id Nai dini on camnjl*. 

' ampuh BeaniHicaiKm nicetina I ImiNjav ai 
WW. 



business a lift?" 

"If it ever did," said Fritz, 
"it sure isn't working now. 
What we need is to put our tax 
money into what would make 
jobs, like fixing up the roads 
and sewers." - 

"So if it's a good idea to 
balance the budget, why don't 
they just do it?" 

"That's just what Sam 
Donaldson asked the president 
at his news conference - twice. 
On the second try, here's what 
Reagan answered." 

Fritz opened his paper and 
read slowly: 

"I'm answering the 
question because the question 
you asked is - the answer is so 
obvious. That obviously, 
after these years of out-of- 
control and built up to the 
level they have, there's no one 
that pretended that you could - 
this would then have to go to 
the states for ratification. 

"There would be a period of 
time before it was actually put 
in place. And in tht period of 
lime, you have an opportunity 
to work out a budget which 
would not have to penalize 
people who are dependent 
now, because, on the 
Government for help." 

Chuck took the paper and 
read it for himself. After a 
long pause, he said: 

"About that double digit. 1 
think somebody is giving us 
the finger." 



SutUcni Seniccs ineetinf Tucsda) ai 4:45. 
Distinguished Lecturer. Jonathan Ko/od 
Uednesdat at WlOa.ni. 

SI. A h'outtall Practice. Tnursda\ at !:Uft 
KOI (held. 

John William* moved to adjourn. Hoh 
I'earce secivkle4k Motion oiSKed. 

Kespeetfulh tutnnithn 
\iiison Attlttn 
Seerelar* 



. t^.' ,o r Advertising Manager 

Joe Cunningham Jr. Alison Breazeale 



Co-News Editor 
Barbi Hall 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Editor 
Susan Arthur 

Dean Napoli 
Circulation Manager 



Co-News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Dianna Gratlon 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatley 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce it tbe official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
Umverwiy in Natchitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesda> 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
primed at the Natchitoches Times, Highway I 
South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224, Arts and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is J57-54S6. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are S4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through ihe final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the wmer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters io the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern- 
Letters must be Mgned and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They- may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter tor journalistic style and available space 

Send postal torm number 3579 to Current 
Sauce, NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 



October 19, 1982. C'urreni Sauce. Page5 



Commentary 

Northwestern Dedication Growing 



By Joe Stamey 
SGA President 

I was intrigued while 
reading a newspaper article 
about the Delta Airlines 
employees' dedication and 
loyalty to their company. It 
seems that these people sin- 
cerely appreciated the things 
that their management were 
doing for them (despite the 
current economic conditions 
which we are going through). 
These employees got together 
and decided that they wanted 
to give something back to 
Delta. They believed in their 
company and were thankful to 
have a good job while working 
for good people. In fact, they 
were so thankful, that they 
announced a campaign to buy 
one of the ten new 767 jets at a 



cost of "only" 30 million 
dollars. Now that is what you 
call dedication. 

Northwestern should learn 
something from this example. 
We have already seen many 
other groups and individuals 
begin to wake up and realize 
that they appreciate the 
cultural, social, and academic 
impact that Northwestern has 
made on their lives. The 
administration, alumni, 
community, faculty, slate 
boards of education, and 
legislature have all let NSU 
know that they believe in its 
future. 

Many people have remarked 
that never before have they 
felt so positive about the 
present atmosphere around 
NSU. Dr. Orze has brought 



with him a tremendous feeling 
of optimism and confidence. 
He has let us know that we 
have a great thing here at NSU 
and that we can do anything if 
we simply put our minds 
together and work toward 
accomplishing our goals. The 
alumni, under Raymond 
Arthur, have begun a great 
program at NSU by starting 
alumni chapters in cities all 
over Louisiana. They have 
worked with many community 
leaders, including Mayor Joe 
Sampite, in volunteering their 
time and energies into 
recruiting new students lor the 
university through their "THE 
PLACT FOR YOU IS NSU" 
campaign. The faculty are 
among the friendliest in the 
South. It is nice to know ihev 



JOSTEN'S 

GOLD RING 

SALE 



15 off 



lOKGold 



30 off 



14KGold 




St 




SEE YOUR JOSTENS REPRESENTATIVE. 

October 26 and 27 

9:00-3:00 

Student Union Building Lobby (1 st Floor) 
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 



sincerely care about students 
as individuals, and not jusl a 
"social security number." The 
Board of Trustees have ex- 
pressed a strong coinmiiineni 
to NSU in making sure that 
Dr. Or/e is prov ided wiih all 
the "tools" necessary io 
insure a great future tor 
Northwestern. Senator Don 
Kelly and Repi escniaiv c 
Jimmy Kong have helped NSl 
with their support in Baton 
Rouge in passing legislation 
that benefits North western. 

There is one more group 
that makes up Northwestern— 
THE STUDENTS! We are 
the reason that NSU exists. I 
guess you could say that all of 
these other groups are working 
for us in an attempt to make 
our college experience the very 
best il can be. However, I 
think the time has come for us 
to acknowledge their good 
woik and begin a com- 
mittment by the students of 
NSU to let the people know 
l hat we believe in NSU, too. 
Our appreciation to the 
university should be more than 
just a "thank you." NSU has 
given many good things to the 
students; it is lime for these 
students to give something 
back. 

We can help Northwestern 
in many ways, particular ly 
with recruiting high school 
students, reviving "dormant" 
alumni , and improving 
student retrenchment. We, as 
students of NSU, must first 
take a hint from other 
members of the "Nor- 
thwestern family'- and become 



commit teo to making our 
I'm ure ev en brighter. W e must 
learu to work on solving 
problems ourselves instead of 
just complaining about them. 
After all. involvement is one 
of the most important aspects 
of student life at NSU and we 
are encouraged io meet with 
faculty and administration in 
attempting to continually 
improve Northwestern. 

NSU students can help by 
recruiting high school student* 
to Northwestern. The office 
of High School Relations has 
said main limes that the Best 
recruiters for NSU is the 
students. We can also help 
NSU by reaching mil to our 
alumni and attempt to help 
them become recommitted 
toward working lor NSU 
through such things as job 
placement and scholarships. 
Also, in the past, NSU has losi 
many of our students through 
retrenchment. We need io 
improve keeping our students 
here ai Northwestern, instead 
of allowing them io leave after 
one or iwo semesters. We 
should certainly instill a 
positive attitude concerning 
NSU in the minds of out 
fellow students who may have 
"second thoughts" about the 
university. 

We can play a majoi role in 
making NSU great, bin, 
before we can expect others io 
believe in Northwestern, we 
must first believe in NSU 
Ourselves. l et us make an 
active commitment to Nor- 
thwestern and support ihe 
T'URIT I I'RIDI 



HEY 
NSU STUDENTS 

Show Your Spirit! 

Wear your State Fair t-shirt to Cane 
River Liquors any time this week 
and get: * . 

1/2 price 

frozen drinks 
and 50* Beer 

This ofter good all week. Stock up 
now for your State Fair Weekend 
supplies. 




RIVER 

(LIQUO RJ 

Cane River Shopping Center 
Next to Winn-Dixie 



Currcnl Sauce, Page 6, October 19, 1982 



Organizations 



Tri-Sigma 

On October 15th, at C appy 
Prudhommc's, Tri-Sigma held 
their Big Sister-Little Sister 
Exchange. The girls were 
excited to finally find out their 
secret admirers. Our thanks 
go out to Cappy for putting up 
with a group of screaming girls 
all night long. Well, it has 
happened again-those Sigmas 
did it to the Phi Mu's last week 
in a competitive flag football 
game. Sigma Sigma Sigma is 
looking forward lo a super 
vid >rv over those Bulldogs this 
weekend. This is the year of 
the DEMON! Good luck 
Demons. 



Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta chapter of 
Delta Zela held a formal 
meeting Monday, Oct. II, 
1982. Al this meeting the 
sorority voted on proposed 
rush changes, a fund raiser for 
panhellenic, having a big 
Christina's Parly in place of a 
fall dance and Pledge of the 
Week. Other items on the 
agenda included the window 
wash this Friday and the 
founders Day celebration. 
Congratulations to Jacklyn 
Council from the chapter lor 
being the Pledge of the Week. 

Baptist Student Union 

The BSU is currently in- 
volved in several money 
making projects for missions. 
Ihe money collected will be 
used to send students on BSU 
missions around the world. 
One of our projects is the 
penny jar (the boys vs. girls) 
Another is called A Dollar For 
Missions. Each BSU'er is 
asking 20 friends donate one 
dollar or more for missions. 



Zeta Phi Beta 

We the lovely ladies of Zeta 
Phi Beta Sorority extend 
congratulations to Dwanda 
Smith for being elected to 
Stale Fair Court. We are also 
happy to announce Dwanda as 
the New Representative-at- 
large of SUGB, and Co- 
Captain of Cane River Belles. 
We know she will serve each 
just as well as she serves the 
sorority. Congratulations Dee 
and may your foundation 
always stand good upon the 
character of Finer 
Womanhood. 

I he Zetas held their second 
formal meeting October 3. On 
the agenda was various 
campus and community 
projects, Sigma-Zeta talent 
show, and other semester 
activities. One of our recent 
achievements was a plaque 
from the interdenominational 
Choir of Natchitoches for 
sponsoring a concert in the 
Student Union ballroom. 

Sigma Tau Delta 

The Nu lota chapter of 
Sigma Tau Delta reactivated 
and held its first meeting 
Wednesday, October 13. The 
organization, open to English 
(and English Education) 
majors and minors, elected 
officers for the 1982-83 
academic year. They are: 
Christine Avant, President; 
Susan Haga, Vice-President; 
Lee Anne Moore, Secretary; 
and Allen l ord. Treasurer. 
Dr. Christine Pickering-Ford 
is Sponsor. Regular meetings 
will be held the first Wed- 
nesday of each month, at 
noon, in room 313 Keyser 
Hall. Prospective members 
arc urged lo attend the 
November meeting, as ihe 
club's photograph is scheduled 
to be taken. 



Bojangles & 
Kappa Alpha Order 

Want to Start Your State Fair 
Week-End Right 

From Atlanta, Ga. 
The Funkiest Band in the South 

Stone Jam 

$2.00 men 
$1.00 ladies 
Ladies get 1st drink free. 
Show Your NSU Spirit and Party With Us! 



Delta Psi Kappa 

At the beginning of the fall 
semester, Delta Psi. Kappa 
brought in its newly elected 
officers. The officers were: 
Tammy Curry-president, 
Cindy Duke-vice president, 
Alison Bartee-secretary, Vicki 
Carmile-treasurer, Jacquetta 
Navarre-chaplain, Ghlee 
Woodworth-historian, Jenny 
Johnson-publicity chairman, 
and Tootie Cary-reporter. 
The faculty advisors for Delta 
Psi Kappa are Dr. Sue 
Molstad and Dr. Bonnie 
Lock wood. 

Delia Psi Kappa had a 
social gathering October 2nd 
on Chaplains Lake where they 
enjoyed a picnic and an af- 
ternoon of canoeing. The 
professional fraternity will be 
looking forward lo ihe 2lst of 
October when it will be having 
its Founder's Day as well as its 
pledging ceremonies at 7:30 
p.m. in the P.E. Majors 
Building. 



Kappa Sigma 

The Brothers of Kappa 
Sigma would like lo thank the 
sisiers of Phi Mu for an 
evening of fun and drink at 
our Pajama Party. Luckily 
for us only a few of the girls 
were "Hiding." Special (hanks 
lo Bubba Soileau for his disco 
decorations. 

Last week in Intramural 
Football our number one learn 
played our number two team, 
the score was lied. 



Sigma Kappa 

Thanks to all the people 
who supported our annual 
Spaghetti Supper, on October 
5. It was a great success. 

This week, is "Be A 
Lifesaver for The Aged." 
Sigma Kappa is selling 
lollipops for a quarter and all 
proceeds go to our philan- 
thropy, gerontology. Please 
help us to help the elderly by 
contributing. 

Sigma Kappa enjoyed an 
exchange Thursday, Oct. 7 
with Theta Chi fraternity at 
the Recreation Complex. The 
theme was Roaring Twenties 
and everyone had a good time! 
We are also looking forward 
to the Panhellinic/IFC Jzch 
exchange tomorrow. 

Sigma Kappa says, "Best of 
Luck at State Fair, Demons! 
'We are behind you all the 
way!!!" 



Blue Key 

Blue Key is currently 
making plans for the 
President's Investilule, Family 
Day and Blue Key's Banner 
Contest. 

Details will be forthcoming 
on the Blue Key Banner 
Contest— watch for mote 
details! 

Tutoring is available for 
free from Blue Key. Students 
desiring help with classes 
should contact Special Ser- 
vices or a Blue Key member. 

The next Blue Key meeting 
is scheduled for Wednesday, 
October 20, at 6:30 p.m. in the 
Student Union. 



Panhellenic 

The NSU Panhellenic 
Council held a formal meeting 
Wed. Oct. 13, 1982. Items on 
the agenda included collecting 
dues, voting on the rush 
change proposals regarding 
Howdy Dance, the 
rescheduling of the 
Progressive Supper to 
Thursday, Oct. 28, 1982 at 
5:30, nominations for Mr. and 
Miss NSU, finding out how 
each sorority felt about adding 
$2 to Panhellenic dues to pay 
for a talking slide projector 
for High School Relations and 
discussing special Olympics 
sponsoring, GPA 
requirements for initiation, 
the Tech party cancellation 
and the Greek X-mas Festival 
Drive. The next meeting was 
set as being Oct. 27 at 4:00 
p.m. 



TKE 



The Epsilon Upsilon 
Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
hopes everyone is looking 
forward to a great state fair 
week and more importantly a 
victory for the Demons. We 
have donated some wood for 
the burn the Bulldog bon-fire 
hoping to make it the best 
ever, and have a large source 
of wood in mind if needed. 
The pile is too big to describe! 
Intramural football goes on 
and we are in the thick of 
things. With half the season 
remaining, TKE No. 1 is going 
to make a strong stand. 



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Welcomes all NSU 

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October 19. 1982. Current Sauce. Pane 7 



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LOOK FOR GARP at a theatre hear campus. 



Off 




Shoes 

Cash in on tremendous savings from 
Connies, Candies, Shoes 'N Stuff, 
Naughty But Nice, for your State Fair 
Weekend 

Prices good 
Mon., Oct. 18 - Fri., Oct. 22. 

GO DEMONS!! 

The Shoe Den 

357-9593 (Next to Gold Nugget) 9-6 Mon. -Sat. 



M«Mm«tii« VrVVIrYlrVV I fWWiUVUUUUU [ 



c,Xv 



Sub-Machine 

Sandwich Shop 

582 Front St. 
(Next to the Don Theatre) 



WRECK TECH SPECIAL 
Buy one Sandwich 
Get one FREE 
with NSU ID 

Offer good Oct. 1 9-22 
Must present coupon to get purchase. 



For orders to go 352-91 34 

Sundaes 20 Flavors of Ice Cream 




v. 



Current Sauce, Page 8, October 1 " 



Jazz Orchestra 
Tonight 

The Widespread Ja/./ 
Orcliestra, a group of young 
musicians which is per- 
petuating the "big band" 
sound ot the I93()'s and 
194()'s, will be featured in 
concert Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 
Northwestern State 
University. 

The nine-member en- 
semble's performance at 7 
p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom is being sponsored 
by the fine arts committee of 
the NSU Student Union 
Governing Board. Admission 
to the concert is $2 for adults 
and $1 for NSU faculty-staff 
members and children 12 years 
and younger. NSU students 
are free with their IDs. 

Material for their live 
record albums and national 
lour concerts al theatres, 
nightclubs and colleges in 25 
slates this year is drawn from 
classic jazz compositions by 
such great artists as Duke 
Ellington, Count Basic, 
lletcher Henderson, Louis 
Jordan and Jimmy Lunceford. 

I he Widespread Jazz 
Orchestra also performs 
original compositions, three of 
which are included in the 
group's latest album, "Swing 
Is The Thing," that is being 
released this week On the 
Adelphi Record label. 

Math Anxiety 

Workshop 

Thursday 

A w or k s h o p call e d 
"Overcoming Math Anxiety" 
will be conducted by Henrietta 
Lard of the Special Service 
Project. Math anxiety, a 
condition familiar to most 
students, is the anticipation of 
an unpleasant threat related to 
situations where the use of 
Mathematics is required. 

Many students experience 
Math anxiety as fear of Math 
or of Math Classes. That is 
they feel that they will not puns 
the class before they enroll, 
attend sessions and become 
familiar with the content and 
the requirements of the 
course. Other students 
"Block" when taking 
Mathematics tests and cannot 
complete problems although 
they may have worked similar 
problems correctly in practice 
sessions. 

These and other symptoms 
of Math anxiety will be 
discussed in the workshop and 
strategies will be suggested for 
overcoming Math anxiety. 
The workshop will be held on 
Thursday, October 21, 1982 at 
2:00 p.m. in Room 201 - 
Caldwell Hall. 



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and get up to 2 free 
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order a 16" pizza, 
you can get up to 4 
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One coupon per pizza. 



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Friday. October 22 



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Saturday. October 23 



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Fast, Free Delivery 

Coupon good 
Sunday. October 24 



B 


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ATTENTION ALL NSU DEMONS 

The Place to Party For State Fair Is 

Denims 

and 
Diamonds 

No Club is Comparable 

Crown Royal Chevis JD Turkey VO Bar Brands 

1.85 1 85 1.85 1.85 1.85 1.50 



Come take advantage of our low prices. 

also 

RALLEY IN THE ALLEY IS BACK 

Don't You HIDE From the Fun!! 

Denims and Diamonds wants to party with the 
Demons all weekend long. Don't miss the fun 
and games all day Saturday in the Square. 

All sorority girls and college girls celebrate your birthday 
at Denims and Diamonds. 

We will provide free champagne and pay for your cake. 
Bring your decorations and be ready to celebrate! 



BE THERE, ALOHA! 



415 Spring St. (Next to the Square) 
318-949-9695 



Sports 



Current Sauce, Page 10, October 19, 1982 



Demon Down Braves 



Roger's Voice 



By Roger Reynolds 



Northwestern 's Kickers 
Are Two of the Best 



Northwestern lias the 
pleasure of having (wo of the 
best kickers in Louisiana. 
They are Dale Quickel and 
Leo Clement. Dale is ihc 
Demon place kicker, while 
Leo is the Demon punter. 

Dale and Leo are seniors 
this year and the Demons will 
have to find a replacement for 
I hem before next season. 
Before each game both players 
go thru the same routine anil 
that is to just sit back and 
watch a college game on 
television. Neither think to 
much about the upcoming 
game. Sonic may think that 
punting and place kicking are 
far apart, but both have lite 
same problems when one is 
kicked bad. If a bad kick is 
gotten off thai jusi means thai 
i( has been rushed or they are 
jusl to tense to kick the ball. 
The same goes thru their mind 
before thev kick the ball, that 



is get a good snap and then 
just swinn smoothly thru the 
ball. 

Dale's worst game was 
against Southeastern last year, 
while Leo's was against Boise 
Stale, because evcrytime he 
kicked the ball they had their 
hands on it . 

When ask about the dif- 
ference between this year's 
and last years team. Dale said, 
'Lot belter leadership on this 
year's team than on last 
year's. Last year we had a lot 
more injuries except in this 
year's quarterback situation." 
Leo replied, "We know we 
have the talent, but there is no 
one to instill any leadership.' 

Dale and Leo both have the 
want and desire to have a 
winning season in their last 
year as Demons as well as 
Coach Williams lasi year at 
the Demon helm. 



The Demons won their 26 
game against six losses in 
Turpin Stadium, Saturday by 
defeating the Alcorn Braves 
28-7. Northwestern was lead 
by Leroy Ellis who had 3 
touchdowns on that night. 
Ellis's three touchdowns came 
on two one yard runs and one 
eight yard run. Nor- 
thwestern's touchdown was on 
a seven yard pass from Stan 
Powell to Victor Oatis. 
Powell on the night had 12 
completions on 20 attempts 
for 156 yards with one in- 
terception and one touch- 
down. Northwestern's 
rushing game picked up for 
the night 107 yards rushing 
and a total of 270 yards on the 
evening. The bright spot for 
the Demons on the night was 
punter Leo Clement who 
punted twice for an average of 
59.5 yards. Leo's longest punt 
on the night sat a Demon 
record, it was 78 yards 
breaking the old record by 
three yards sat by Barry Rubin 
in 1979 against Stephen F. 
Austin in Turpin Stadium. 

Northwestern's leading 
receiver on the night was Jerry 
Wheeler with five catches for 
79 vards, Victor Oatis had 3 



catches tor 37 yards and one 
touchdown. The Demons 
leading rusher was freshmen 
Anthony Cheeks who for 49 
yards on 11 attempts. This is 
not a high total of rushing 
yards but Cheeks gave the 
Demons and inside rasing 
game that they did not have in 
the previous games. 



Bulldogs Present Tough 
Challenge in State Fair Classic 



flic Louisiana Tech 
Bulldogs present the foe for 
the Demons [his weekend. 
I'hat's right, this is State lair 
week. I he Bulldogs from 
Kusi oil have dominated the 
Demons in the last 10 years. 
Lhis year the Dogs are lead by 
quarterback Mall Dimnigan. 
who leds the Southland 
Conference in passing. 
Dimnigan throws io receivers 
I reddic Brown, Chris Tilley 
(younger brother of Si. Louis 
Cardinal and Tech Oraduaie 
Pal Tilley) among his other 
receivers. 

Northwestern's defensn e 
secondary will definite!) be 
put to the test lhis week. Lhis 
is the best passing aiiack thai 
i he Demon secondary has 
faced all year. lor the 
Demons to be successful they 
will have lo put pressure on 
the quarterback. The 
Demon's will also bring into 



i he game a passing attack. 

Northwestern's biggest 

question is will they have all 
heir quarterbacks healthy and 
llso can the Demons come up 

with a rushinu name io balance 



out the pass. 

.If the Demons are not able 
to slop the Bulldogs passing 
aiiack and score some on their 
own, ii will definitely be a long 
night for all Demons and fans. 



State Fair 
Sale!!! 

20 % oft 

NSU Imprinted Merchandise 
(tee's, jackets sweaters, mugs, 
pennants, etc.) 

University Bookstore 



Alcorn only picked up a 
total of 182 yards on offense 
for the night. The Braves were 
held to 38 yards rushing and 
144 yards passing. Quar- 
terback Edwin Myles had 10 
completions on 22 attempts 
and two interceptions for 128 
yards and one touchdown. 

Northwestern's defense 
seemed to play with more 
intensity this game, as the 
Demon defense was lead by a 
number of Demon defenders. 

Coach A. L. Williams was 
pleased with the Demon 
victory. Williams had this to 
say, T thought our game plan 
.worked very well. The only 
thing 1 was disappointed with 
was our missed opportunities 
to score. Braves Coach 
Marino H. Casern had this to 
say about the Demon's, 'I 
can't understand how they 
have lost the games they have, 
considering the way they 
played tonight.' The Demons 
are now 5-2 going into the 
annual State Fair game against 
the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs 
this weekend in Shreveport. 



Demon 
Playground 

In intramurals, the flag- 
football program completed 
its third week of competition. 
VIPs took an easy 58-0 victory 
over Sigma Kappa as Susan 
Prince paced all scorers with 
24 points. Renetta Judice 
added 15 points for the vic- 
tors, while Lisa Lennan 
contributed 12 tallies in the 
one-sided game. 

In the only other women's 
game played on Wednesday, 
UnKappa 5th number two 
took a narrow 6-0 win over 
UnKappa 5th number one on a 
touchdown by Lonnie Banks 
with just one minute 
remaining in the game. 

The YANGsters got by East 
Rapides 52-0 in a team effort. 
The Sig's first team squared 
off against the Sig's second 
team in a contest that showed 
an abundance of brotherly 
love. The number ones fell 
behind in the first half 6-0 
after Tod Klotzback scored 
for the second team. In the 
second period the first team 



State Fair 
Game, 
Saleabration! 

1 5 % oh 

Entire Shoe and Boot 
Inventory 

3 DAYS ONLY 

Thursday, October 21st thru 
Saturday, October 23rd. 



s >.s- 



FOOTWORKS 



This sale pertains to NSU students 
only — Student ID nust be 
presented to receive 1 5% discount. 



Sandef ur Shoes 

608 Front St. 

Across fro T! the Front St. Bridge 
357-0053 



October 1 9, 1982. C'urrcni Sauce. Pace 1 1 



This 

Week's 

Games 



Porker Picker Panel ★ 



NSU vs 
La. Tech 



LSU vs 
South Carolina 




Roger 
Reynolds 



NSU 
35-24 



LSU 
38-14 



Houston vs 
Arkansas 



Nebraska vs 
Missouri 



Oregon vs 
Nortre Dame 



Oklahoma vs 
Oklahoma Si. 



West Virginia 
v * PennSl. 



Texas >s 
SMI 



Kansas v s 
Kansas St. 



Ashland vs 
Butler 



Arkansas 
28-17 



Nebraska 
42-14 



Notre Dame 
27-10 



Oklahoma 
28-10 



Penn St. 
21-17 



SMU 
24-21 



Kansas 
21-17 



Butler 
17-10 





John 

Cunningham 



NSU 
38-35 



LSU 
28-10 



Arkansas 
24-10 



Nebraska 
28-14 



Notre Dame 
28-10 



Oklahoma 
24-21 



Penn St. 
27-17 



SMU 
24-10 



Kansas 
31-21 



Butler 
21-0 



Alison 

Breazeale 



NSl 
21-17 



LSI 

35-17 



Arkansas 
17-10 



Nebraska 
28-21 



Notre Dame 
31-20 



Oklahoma 
28-14 



Penn St. 
21-10 



Texas 
27-14 



Kansas St. 
27-20 



Butler 

35-13 



1 




Joe 
Cunningham 



NSl 
21-20 



LSI 
42-13 



Arkansas 
24-21 



Nebraska 
28-10 



Oklahoma 
35-20 



Penn St. 
14- I J 



SMU 
28-14 



Kansas St. 
31-7 



Butler 

27-20 




Beverly 
Armstrong 



NSl 
27-20 



LSI 

35-17 



Arkansas 
20-10 



Nebraska 
35-14 



Notre Dame 
28-21 



Oklahoma St. 
17-10 



Penn St. 
28-17 



SMI 
21-14 



Kansas SI. 
21-19 



Ashland 
19-7 



Tech Bulldog 



NSU 
412-00 



South Carolina 
25-11 



Houston 
15-4 



Missouri 
5-1 



Oregon 
33-2 



Oklahoma St. 
4-0 



West Virginia 
l9' 4 -4' 2 



Texas 
2-1 




Kim 
Kimble 



NSl 
24-21 



LSI 
21-14 



Houson 
27-17 



Nebraska 
41-20 



Notre Dame 
24-14 



Oklahoma 

32-6 



West \ irginia 
28-21 



SMU 
31-10 



Kansas 
20-14 



Butler 
10-7 



...More 
Playground 

W hile being a little bit old 
and liule bit new, the Nor- 
thwestern rifle icam in 1982 
has continued to be one thing-- 
very good. 

Lor the first lime, the 
Northwestern State rifle icam, 
long a competitive spoil at 
NSU. is considered as an 
NCAA spoil. While lhai is a 
bit: change lor the squad, the 
squad hasn't changed its 
winning ways of previous 
years as the Demon shooters 
have taken victories in both of 
their matches this I all. 

The Northwestern rifle team 
opened the ball schedule with 
a win over Centenary College 
and lasi weekend defeated 
McNeese State. Both matches 
were won by a considerable 
margin. 

In a rifle shooting match, 
each learn consists of Ibtu 
members. Laeh member of 
the team, shooting from a 50 
foot distance, fires 60 laigcis 
with 10 points each, a perfect 
score being ■600'. Th targets arc 
fired from three positions, 20 
from a prone posiiion, 20 
from a kneeling position and 
20 from a standing position. 
The scores of each of the fOut 
shooters are totaled lot the 
team score. 

The NSU shooters ouC 
scored Centenary', 1,917 io 
1,626, and then won the match 
ai McNeese Slate by scoring 
1,912 point s compared lo 
1,811 by McNeese Slate. In 
ihc match ai Centenary, 
Northwestern was led by Circg 
Salard with a 498 score, Scot! 
lord shot 489 and ka\ 
Harbison shot 480. 



Thigpen Wins, Panel Embarrassed; Reynolds Hires Moron 



Ageless Mark Thigpen, the 
°ne man wonder of 
"Kingpin" fame, threw up a 
remarkable 9-1 week to grab 
l °P honors for the Porker 
f'eker Panel pigskin picks, 
last week. 

"Totally embarrassing," is 
ihe way P.P. panelist^ John 
Cunningham (7-3) put it at the 
Weekly meeting of the of the 
Pp - panel. "I think next 
w eek we need to get some real 
moron to pick in that spot, so 
*e all won't be totally 
numilified." P.P. member Joe 
Cunningham (7-3) said, "I 
'"ought we had one THIS 
*eek. 

Sports editor, Roeer 
Reynolds (8-2) hurriedly 
re Plied that he had already 
contacted a complete idiot to 
;f*e that position this week. 

1 called the La. Tech Bulldog 
aie last night and asked him 
°e < a guest selector this 

eek,". Roger said, "and the 
d umb- s agreed." 
• A >ison Breazeale (8-2), who 

J " ni Peda!lthewavfromalast 
p d *- e He last week to a tie for 
■ourth this week, said "You 



can tell how stupid the Bulldog 
is, he has Texas beating SMU 
by 2-1. Any fool knows that 
SMU is going to score at least 
4. 

The two other guest 
panelists last week, Vera 
LaCour and Larry Hall both 
brought home remarkable 8-2 
records to continue the bat- 
tering of the P.P. panel's 
regular staff members. 

At his weekly press con- 
ference in Room 306 in 
Bullard Hall, Reynolds an- 
nounced that if all three guest 
panelists either tie or beat all 
of the P.P. panel regulars, 
then he would fire the regular 
members of the panel and 
replace them with teachers. 
This brought a loud round of 
laughter from the partisan 
crowd of Associated Press and 
.United Press International 
reporters. 

This week, State Fair Queen 
Kim Kimble and Court 
member Beverly Armstrong 
join the un-illustrious 
members of the P.P. panel 
and the La. Tech Bulldog in 
selecting the round of truly 



exciting and highly emotional favored over Ashland by 37 

games. Bookies in Las Venas points instead of the 

meanwhile announced that in previously announced, 3.7 

a suprise move, Bullet was points. 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 

IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



DenoN Playground 



retaliated with a Jay Vail to 
Mike Brown pass, good lor 6 
points. The game went into 
overlirhe wiih score lied ai 6 
apieee. 

Hie Sigs' first learn got first 
possession in I he overtime 
period and scored on their first 
play from scrimmage as Vail 
ran around end lor (he I .IX 
On the extra-point conversion, 
ii was Vail again running 
around I he lel'l end, 10 make 
the score 13-6. On the second 
team's possession I hey also 
scored on the I'irsl play from 
scrimmage on a touchdown by 
Russell Bicnvcnu. The second 



learn went lor a iwo-point 
conversion that would have 
given ihem a 14-13 win, but 
(ell short which gave the first 
team a 13-12 win. 

In the final game of the day, 
l be KAs look an 18-0 triumph 
from TKL on two touchdowns 
by John Non id. 

Amy Williams and Susan 
Johnson paced Tri-Sig with 6 
points apiece as they shut-oul 
Sigma Kappa 13-0. The Phi 
Mus had to forfeit their game 
with VI Ps because of a lack of 
players due to a Red Measles 
scare. 



In the men's games on 
I husday, the Steelers grabbed 
a 25-14_.viclory away from 
Conine. Vince Williams, 
Jason White, Tony Mayes, 
and Waller Pinkston all scored 
touchdowns for the sieelers. 
YANCi's number two learn 
but-scored BSU to lake an 18- 
13 win. Perry Anderson, 
Tony Thompson, and Parker 
Thompson scored 6 points 
each in the YANG win. 

The intramural pool 
tournament was held two 
weeks ago wiih 48 individuals 
in the men's singles bracket on 



hand while the women's 
division consisted of 18 
people. 

Keith Washington of 3-V 
International look top honors 
in the men's singles while 
William Acevedo of Kingpins 
grabbed • second place. 
YANGster Rodney Thrash 
finished third behind 
Washington and Acevedo. 

Phi Mu's Angela Lasyone 
was t he women's singles 
champ. Ginny Whitaker, an 
independent, came in second. 
UnKappa 5th's Sherri Broocks 
lied with Sarah Morgan, 
another independent for the 
ihird spol in the loumy. 

The men's doubles com- 
petition consisted of 24 teams, 
inwhieh YANG took the top 
spol wiih the team of Paul 
Rino and John Jackson. Jon 
Mouser and Henry Inuram 



look a second place finish for 
i he Sig Dogs. Mike Turner 
and Bogy Patton of BSU lied 
lor third place wiih the learn 
from KA. 

Sherri Broocks learned wiih 
Siephany Washington, also of 
UnKappa 5th, to take lop 
honors in the women's 
doubles contest. Theia Chi's 
Monica Bailee and Carla Lee 
wound up second in the 
competition. Tanya Leone 
and Sonja Griffiths of VIPs 
tied for third with in- 
dependents Ginny Whitaker 
and Sarah Morgan. 

NOTE: The men's singles 
and i he women's singles and 
doubles of the tennis tour- 
nament which was postponed, 
will be completed on Wed- 
nesday October 27ih al I he 
recreation complex starting al 
6:30 p.m. 




■ - ^Atifl _. T-shirt, tor men and ±JI \ 



Order now- 



PO 



Name 



College 




Adult sizes only. Specify quantity. 

T-shirt @ $4.95 ea., S M L XL Amount Enclosed $ 

Otter expires June 30 1983 No purchase necessary New Vurk residents add 8 2S»o sales tax Please allow 4 lo 6 weeks tor shipnien 





urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX No. 10 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




October 26, 1982 



No Cause Yet Determined In Caldwell Fire 



By Lisa Williams 

According to Natchitoches 
Fire Chief Oscar Vails, no 
cause has been determined in 
the fire that destroyed 
Caldwell Hall on Monday 
night, October 18. 

The fire, reported at 10:15 
p.m., was battled by 30 
firemen and five units from 



the Natchitoches Fire 
Department. Back-up units 
were also called in from 
Campti and Cloutierville. 

A brick building with three 
floors and a basement, 
Caldwell Hall was built in 
1906 at a cost of $355,000. It 
was completely refurbished in 
1968 at a cost of $410,000. 



Vails said the blaze ap- 
peared to have started in the 
basement near the center of 
the building. 

An estimate of the actual 
loss had not been determined 
early Tuesday, but Loran 
Lindsey, Northwestern's 
physical plant director, said 
that replacement costs of the 




Caldwell Hall as it looked on Semptember 2, 1982, and as it looked on 
October 21, just three days after fire gutted the oldest building on the 
Northwestern campus. 

After The Fire, Life Goes On 

Less than 24 hours after 
Caldwell Hall's burning, the 
Picking up and starting and 
starting over began. Offices 
currently unused are being 
opened again. Space is being 
made in this corner or that to 
accomodate an extra desk. An 
empty wing in Caspari dorm 
now has a use. The old Trade 
School, its purpose for the 
NSU Music Department now 
fulfilled, has another job. 

"The loss is a crucial blow, 
°ut we have to start over," 
said Randy Nichols, Director 
of Enrollment Management. 
And thus the reorganization 
nas begun. 

Many students were con- 
cerned about losses within the 
Financial Aid Office. Ac- 
cording to Terry Faust, 
assistant director of financial 
a 'd. "10 to 15 hundred folders 
of aid recipients" were 
destroyed bvthe fire. 



The Financial Aid office is 
busy reconstructing their files. 
The task is difficult espccialh 
for students not yet awarded 
financial aid, Faust said. Bui 
for those students having 
received financial aid this 
year, it is much easier because 
their records were kept in the 
NSU Computer Center. 

"What's so sad," said 
Nichols, "is that beyond the 
loss of the building are the 
papers that will be so hard to 
replace. We lost 9000 names, 
addresses, and phone numbers 
of prospective NSU students. 
I entered the last backlog on 
the terminal at 8:15 Monday 
night. We were caught up for 
the very first time," he said 
with a touch of irony in his 
voice. 

The 9000 propective 
students will be hard to track 
down. "We critically need for 
every student, faculty 



member, staffmember, and 
community person to dig 
deeply into his brain for 
anyone who might be in- 
terested in coming to Nor- 
thwestern. We need to begin 
rebuilding our files as soon as 
possible," he said. 

And for Mrs. Maxine 
Southerland Director of the 
Center for the History of 
Louisiana Education, the 
starting over has also begun. 
Old Potpourri's, a collections 
of children's books from 
Melrose Plantation, 
photographs, and a white 
dress worn by the very first 
graduate of the Louisiana 
Normal School are among the 
many priceless artifacts that 
are now ashes. 

Bitter losses , yet she has 
not given up. She said the day 
after the fire was almost like a 
funeraL'Our friends came by - 
Continued on Page 3 



building and contents would 
be "several million dollars". 

Named in honor of Beverly 
C. Caldwell, who was Nor- 
thwestern's president from 
1896 through 1908, Caldwell 
Hall served as the university's 
main administrative office 
building until the early 1960's. 

In recent years, the offices 
of the College of Basic- 
Studies, Continuing 
Education, High School 
Relations, Financial Aid, 
Admissions, and other 
departments, have been housed 
in Caldwell Hall. 

Also located in Caldwell 
Hall was the Center for the 
History of Louisiana 
Education, a museum filled 
with an extensive collection of 
materials that reflected the 
progress of the state's 



educational system 
throughout the years. 

At the time of the fire, NSU 
President Dr. Joseph Orze was 
in Poland on an educational 

exchange, but Vice President 
Southerland called the fire "a 
tremendous loss, not only 
because of the records, files, 
equipment, classroom and 
office space that were lost, but 
also because of the enormous 
historic value of the 
building." 

Copied from a building in 
Providence, R.I, Caldwell was 
structurally and ar- 
chitecturally unique. Its roof, 
which featured numerous 
gables toward the ends, stood 
high above other buildings in 
the historic Normal Hill 
District. 



Dean Bosarge Elected 
President of LA CUSP A 



Dr. Fred C. Bosarge of 
Northwestern has been chosen 
as president-elect of the 
Louisiana Association of 
College and University 
Student Personnel Ad- 
ministrators. 

As the president-elect, the 
NSU dean of students will be a 
member of the LACUSPA 
executive committee in 1982- 
83 before assuming the 
position of president of the 
state organization in 1983-84. 

The Louisiana Association 
of College and University 
Student Personnel Ad- 
ministrators is a state wide 
organization of administrative 
leaders at two-year and four- 
year public and private in- 
stitutions across the state. ' 

Dr. Gus Varvaro, vice- 
president for student affairs at 
Nicholls State University in 
Thibodaux, is currently 
serving as president of 
LACUSPA. 



Bosarge, who was awarded 
the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in higher education 
from Florida State University 
in 1981, has been dean of 
^udcntsai NSU since 1978. 

At Northwestern, he also 
served from 1970 to 1972 as 
director of housing and from 
1970 to 1974 as the university's 
dean of men. He was dean of 
the student personnel from 
1974 to 1977. 

Bosarge earned the 
bachelor's degree in history 
from Northwestern in 1961 
and received a master's degree 
in student personnel services 
from NSU in 1970. 

His honors since joining the 
Northwestern staff include the 
Dean Fulton Award from 
NSU's Blue Key National 
Honor Fraternity and the Gail 
Goodwin Award for 
achievements in student 
personnel services. 



Offices Relocated 

Due to the recent fire at Caldwell Hall several offices and 
classes have had to be relocated. 

The new location of the College of Basic Studies, orientation 
classes, ALOC classes, and Special services is the Old Trade 
School. 

Continuing Education, Admissions, High School Relations, 
and Enrollment Management has been moved to East Caspari 
Hall. 

Financial Aid is now in the basement of Roy Hall. 
External Affairs is in the Field Office and Counseling and 
Testing has temporarily been relocated at the infirmary. 



Current Sauce, Page 2, October 26, 1982 



Ostar To Give Address 



Dr. Allan Ostar, president 
of the American Association of 
State Colleges and Universities 
in Washington, D.C., will be 
the keynote speaker Friday, 
Nov. 5, for the investiture of 
Dr. Joseph J. Orze as the 15th 
president of Northwestern. 

Ostar was named in 1965 as 
the first full-time executive 
director of AASCU, and in 
1979 became president of the 
association. Northwestern is 
one of 353 state colleges and 
universities with membership 
in AASCU. 



Life Goes On... 

Continued from page I 

- one brought flowers and 
said, "1 didn't help you before 
but I will this time." 

"We're in the process of 
doing an inventory of all the 
things we lost lor the in- 
surance company, " she said. 
"We are going to appeal to 
educators and museum friends 
lo dig down and try lo find 
anything that needs to be 
preserved." 

The "parish by parish" 
search will be long and hard, 
she says, but it is also 
challenging. "We must slick 
together." 

"To cry about the losses is 
normal and it's human," says 
Randy Nichols," but the task 
of going on is important. We 
were given a choice of starting 
over or packing our bags and 
leaving I own. So we're going 
lo start over. We must start 
now." 

"We're going lo — we really 
are," says Mrs. Soulherland. 

I Be One \ 

J Of The 

\ Beautiful 

\ People 




\Read 
\ The 
\ SA UCE \ 



His address, entitled 
''Higher Education 
Leadership in the Eighties," 
will be delivered at 10 a.m. in 
Prather Coliseum during the 
investiture convocation, which 
will highlight day-long ac- 
tivities planned for the 
celebration. 

Prior to the investiture 
convocation, an ecumenical 
mass will be delivered at 8 
a.m. at the Immaculate 
Conception Church and a 
reception honoring Orze and 
his wife, Carol, will be given 
by the City of Natchitoches 
and the Natchitoches Parish 
Chamber of Commerce at 9 
a.m. at the Lemee House on 
Jefferson Street. 

Other activities include a 
noon luncheon in the NSU 
Student Union Ballroom, the 
opening of the alumni art 
exhibit at 2 p.m. in the Art 
Gallery of the A. A. Federicks 
Center for the Creative and 
Performing Arts and the 
President's Concert at 8 p.m. 
in the Concert Recital Hall of 
the new fine arts complex. 

An open house at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Orze on the 
NSU campus was originally 
scheduled for 3 p.m., but that 
event has been cancelled 
because of renovation to the 
president's home. 

Ostar has spent most of his 
professional career of the past 
30 years working for the 
advancement of public higher 
education, and as AASCU 
president he continues to stres 
constructive planning for the 
future in response to changing 
needs of education and 
society. 

Before joining the AASCU, 
he organized and directed for 
seven years the Joint Office of 
Institutional Research, which 
served the member institutions 
of the State Universities 
Association and the National 
Association of State 
Universities and Land-Grant 
Colleges. 

Since 1968, Ostar has been 
awarded honorary doctoral 
degrees from 13 colleges and 
universities throughout the 
United States in recognition of 
his outstanding national 
contributions to public higher 
education. 

In addition to his duties as 
president of AASCU, Ostar 
serves on the higher education 
advisory committee of the 
Education Commission of the 
States and is chairman of the 
Consortium for International 
Cooperation in Higher 
Education. 

Under a grant from the 
Ford and Sloan Foundations, 
he was selected in 1968 as a 
member of a five-man team to 
prepare reports on higher 
education planning and 





Dr. Allan Ostar 

development throughout the 
world and was among the first 
group of educators to be 
invited to the People's 
Republic of China in 1975. 

Ostar, currently a member 
of the board of the Committee 
for Improvement of Higher 
Education in the Americas, 
has led delegations of 
university presidents to Egypt, 
Greece, Cuba, the Republic of 
China, Mexico and Poland. 



POSTING 
REGULATIONS 
FOR THE 
STUDENT UNION 

All signs posted in the 
Student Union Building 
must be approved in 
Student Union Room 
214 before placement. 
Place advertisements 
only on bulletin boards. 
Those items posted on 
painted surfaces, glass, 
etc. or not approved for 
posting will be taken 
down. Thank you for 
taking care of our 
building. 



Ill 



Week Nights 
7:00-9:15 



THEPTPE/ 352 5109 570 Front 



Saturday & Sunday 
2:00-4:15-7:00-9:15 



It'll lift you up where you belong. 



RICHARD 
GERE 

DEBRA 
WINGER 

AJV 
OFFICER 
AND A 
GENTLEMAN 

m 




SGA Minutes 



October II. 1 982 
The Student Government Association was called 
to order by Stacy Soileau at 6:00 p.m. Dean Napoli 
said i he prayer and Don Stacy led the pledge. Bob 
Pearce moved to accept the minutes from the 
October 4 meeting. Perry Anderson seconded. 
Motion passed. Absent were: Vera Lacour, Peyton 
Cunningham, David Saviors, Bridget Evans, and 
Robert Storment. 

OFFICER REPORTS 

Joe Stamey told the senate that the Parlimnetary 
Procedure class will meet on Friday at 2:00. He 
announced thai we will start a State Student Lobby 
Organization. 

larry hall announced that the deadline for 
Budgets is Friday, oct. 15. He set the budget for 
State Pair at 750.00 for all expenditures. 

Harlan Harvey named the State Fair Court and 
Senators. He said thai Mr. and Miss NSU 
nominations open today and close on Oct. 25. The 
elections will be November 3. 

C OMMITTEE REPORTS 

Noel Nicolle, Student Rights, announced that 
there will be an attorney in the SGA Conference 
Room on Wednesdays from 2-4. If anyone has a 
legal problem the services are FREE and sponsored 
by the SGA. 

Don Stacy. Assembly Chairman, announced ihc 
Speaker on Wednesday. He also said that they had 
a meeting on October 6 and discussed the Lec- 
turers. 

Troy Davidson, Campus Beaut ificaiion. said 
that they will ha\ea meeting Thursday at 3:00. 
Krisii Heyd. Student Life, told the senate to go 



to hear Jonathan Kozol on Wednesday at 9:00. 

NEW BUSINESS 

Troy Davidson moved to open nominations for 
Mr. & Miss NSU. Scott Repp seconded. Motion 
passed. Nominc;ed were: Joe Stamey, Dean 
Napoli, Larry Hall, Krisii Heyd. Stacy Soileau, and 
Cindy Duke. 

Troy Davidson moved to approve State Fair 
Court and Senators. Jack Welch seconded. 
Motion passed. 

Bob Pearce moved to swear in the new senators. 
Pwy Anderson seconded. Motion passed and Joe 
Stamey was asked to swear in the new senators. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Friday at 6:00 there is a PEP RALLY in front of 
the Student Union. 

Delta Zeta Window Wash Friday. 

Noel Nicolle asked if any organization would like 
to sponsor a child in the Special Olympics. If- 
interested contact David Nardini on Campus. 

Campus Beautificatton meeting Thursday at, 
3:00. 

St udent Services meet ing Tuesday at 4:45. 

Distinguished Lecturer, Jonathan Kozol, 
Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. 

SGA Football Practice, Thursday at 3:00. 
ROTC field. 



John Williams moved to adjourn, 
seconded. Motion passed. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Allison Arthur 
Secretary 



Bob Pearce 



We Can Help Make A 
Convert Out of You... 



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start collecting cassettes without junking your player or 
your 8-track tapes. Then when you're ready to make the 
final leap and buy a cassette deck for your car.. .we can 
help you there, too. 

University Sounds 

University Shopping Center 
352-8077 



October 26, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 3 



Organizations 



Delta Sigma Theta 



Ski Team 



SLAE 



Phi Beta Sigma 



TKE 



The Iota Mu Chapter of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 
Incorporated held its second 
formal meeting on Sunday, 
October 10, at 2:00. Service 
projects and pledge period 
activities were among the 
topics discussed at this 
meeting. 

The sorority's service 
projects included a visit to the 
Riverside Chateau Nursing 
Home on Saturday, October 
16 at which popcorn was 
served to the residents. The 
sorority also plans to take ! 
some local children trick-or- 
treating on Halloween. 
Another public service project 
of the chapter will be a Health 
Fair on November 6 at the 
North Street Day Care Center. 

Committee chairpesons 
were also appointed at this 
meeting. They are Sorors 
Rosetta Boone- Jabberwock, 
DeEtra Scott-Greek Show, 
Darlene Brown-Sophisticated 
Gents, and Vera LaCour- 
Church Program and 
Banquet. Soror Chanda 
Harris was named Chair- 
person of Projects. 

Iota Mu is also proud to 
announce its pyramid pledge 
group for the Fall of 82. 
These young ladies are Daisey 
Jenkins-President, Birdia 
Palmer-Vice-President, Debra 
Thompson-Secretary, Beverly 
Armstrong-Treasurer, Susan 
Combest-Reporter, and Jackie 
Larry--Parliamentarian. 
These young ladies attended 
the game at State Fair and 
helped their big sisters at a car 
wash in Shreveport. 

Lastly, lota Mu would like 
( o remind everyone of its 
dance on Wednesday night at 
Bayou Jacko's. We would 
also like to extend a hearty 
congratulations to Soror 
Darlene Brown and Pyramid 
Beverly Armstrong for making 
'he Homecoming Court and to 
Soror Vera LaCour for 
taking State Fair Court. 

fNiiniiiinu 



HnMinmiiyi 



Read 
The 

Sauce 



The NSU Ski Team is 
planning a Garage Sale this 
Saturday beginning at 7:00 am 
at the Exhange Bank parking 
lot (across from Burger King). 
The proceeds from this will 
help fund the 1983 season. 

The team believes that water 
skiing is an outstanding 
spectator sport that can 
generate the interest of 
prospective students and add 
life to our campus. With this 
in mind the team considers 
itself a service to students and 
wishes to make NSU attractive 
to everyone. 

The Ski Team has a slalom 
course and jump set up on 
Cane River where they 
practice throughout the year 
and plan to show strong 
competition against area 
teams this spring. 

Delta Zeta 

The Epoilon Beta Chapter 
of Delta Zeta held a formal 
meeting the items discussed 
include: nominations for Mr. 
and Miss N.S.U., the 
Founders Day celebration, the 
Christmas party, State Fair, 
and officer elections. 
Congratulations goes to Pam 
Duplechian, our pledge of the 
week. 



Student Louisiana 
Association of Educators held 
their monthly meeting October 
5 at 6:00 p.m. in the Teacher 
Education Center. The guest 
speaker was Mrs. Larred. She 
gave an interesting talk on the 
importance of technology in 
the schools and the need for 
teachers to become familiar 
with computers for the future. 
All education majors are 
invited to come to the next 
meeting on November 2 at 
6:00 in the Teacher Education 
Center. 



Kappa Sigma 



Kappa Sigma held the 
drawing for the Honda Ex- 
press Moped Saturday Oc- 
tober 16 and the winner was 
Claude Adcock from Nat- 
chitoches. Special thanks to 
brother Skippy Waters for 
designing the Kappa Sigma 
letters used at the last football 
game. We'll be getting further 
use out of them in future 
games. 



SUGB Announces Events 



The Student Union 
Governing Board will once 
again produce the Annual 
Lady of the Bracelet Pageant 
on February 9, 1983. 

The winner of the pageant 
will represent Northwestern at 
the Miss Louisiana Pageant 
and will be NSU's official 
hostess throughout her reign. 
She will attend various 
festivals, parades, and balls 
around the state. 

The entry fee for each 
contestant is $10.00 and 
should be paid when the entry 
form is turned in at room 214 
in the Student Union by 
November 12. Any 
organization or individual can 
sponsor one or more con- 
testants. 

According to Alicia Haynes, 
President of the Student 
Union Governing Board, there 



are two activities planned by 
the board for the month of 
November. 

On November I, Kim and 
Reggie, a singing duo, will 
appear at 11 a.m. in the 
Student Union Ballroom. 
November 29 is the date that 
the Student Union Christmas 
Window painting contest will 
begin. The windows must be 
finished by December 1 . 

Activities for the month of 
December include noon 
performance by Steve Gibson, 
a cartoonist. Mr. Gibson has 
appeared at NSU, using 
impromtu pictures as a part of 
his comedy act. Also in the 
month of December is the 
Christmas Festival concert 
featuring Ronnie Milsap. The 
concert will be held in Prather 
Coliseum. 



I 1 NAME 



.CLASSIFICATION 



^"llllll 



■IIIIHIIIIIIIIM 



ADDRESS (NSU BOX) 
PARENT'S NAME 



TELEPHONE 



HOMETOWN 



I hereby certify that I have at least a 2.0 overall grade point 
average. 



TALENT DESCRIPTION. 
SPONSOR (IF ANY) 



Signature of Nominee 



We, the brothers of Phi 
Beta Sigma, would like to wish 
everyone the best of luck in 
obtaining propective goals this 
semester. We started off this 
semester with a display and 
rush in the Student Union. 
We also collected money for 
Project S.A.D. (Sigma attacks 
defects). The Brothers of the 
Dove signified the campus 
with a probate-style stomp- 
show in Sabine parking lot. 
Zeta Iota chapter, NSU, 
received a plaque for out- 
standing achievements among 
all Sigma chapters in 
Louisiana. Future plans in- 
cludes Regional workshop in 
Dallas, a Sigma-Zeta Talent 
Show, can good drives, service 
projects in the community and 
of course, another devastating 
stompshow. 

Officers 
Vada Carr - President 
Larry Hall - Vice President 
Jerry Williams - Treasurer 
Larry Hall - Secretary 
Shaun Pitts - Dean of Probate 
Reginald Evans - Dean of 
Pleages 



The brothers of the Epsilon 
Upsilon chapter of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon would like to welcome 
Todd David into the frater- 
nity. He is our newest member 
and was initiated this past 
Wednesday. We hope 
everybody had a great time in 
Shreveport this weeked at the 
game. The chapter was there 
in force to support the 
Demons. We would like to 
thank Mike Waguespak an 
alumni, for the use of his 
house. The He's, would like 
to extend any help that is 
needed in reeards to the fire at 
Caldwell Hall. If anybody 
needs manpower, just ask. 

Football season came to an 
end this week. As predicted 
TKE 1 was in it to the bitter 
end. Our last game was 
against Theta Chi and was a 
fitting way to end the season. 
We are looking forward to the 
rest of Intramural sports on 
the calender. In the meantime 
be looking for the TKE's on 
campus and support our new 
project. More details to 
follow. 

TKE the WINNING 
TRADITION CONTINUES. 



Read This 

Due to the tragic fire in Caldwell Hall, all Financial Aid 
records have been destroyed. In order to comply with Federal 
rules and regulations, the following steps must be taken in order 
to continue receiving aid in the following Federal Aid Programs: 

1. PELL GRANT (BEOG) 

Students who have been awarded a Pell Grant for the Fall 
semester will receive duplicate copies of their SAR's from the 
Federal processor. Please submit the 3 duplicate copies to the 
Financial Aid Office in Roy Hall along with all documentation 
needed (1981 1040 Federal Income Tax, Verification of Social 
Security benefits, Welfare benefits, Veterans benefits, and any 
other income.) Students should receive the duplicate Pell Grant 
copies within 4 weeks. 

Students who have not been awarded or paid Pell Grant must 
write to Pell Grant, P.O. Box 92330, Los Angeles, CA 90009, 
and request duplicate copies of their Pell Grant. You may also 
call Pell Grant at 800-638-6700 and request the duplicate copies. 
Support documentation as stated above must be brought in with 
the duplicate copies. 

2. COLLEGE WORK STUDY, 3. SUPPLEMENTAL 
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS, (SEOG), 4. 
NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS (NDSL), 5. STATE 
STUDENT INCINTIVE GRANTS (SSIG) 

If you have received aid through one of these programs you 
do not need to refile throught ACT Need Analysis. We have 
made arragements through ACT and the NSU Computer Center 
to replace the ACT Need Analysis document at no charge to the 
student. However, if you have the student copy of the 1982-83 
Award Letter, please bring this copy to the Fiancial Aid Office. 

6. GSCES (STATE BANK LOAN) 

All students who have copies of their letters from GSCES 
(Governor's Special Commission on Educational Services) loans 
are asked to submit them to our office. 

The Financial Aid Office is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
and located in the basement of Roy Hall. Please come by and 
talk with us if you have questions concerning your financial aid. 



Opinion 

The Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the 
author's. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
University, its administration, the students or even the rest of 
the Current Sauce staff. The Current Sauce invites letters to the 
editor, which must be signed, as well as guest editorials, which 
must also be signed. Address all correspondence to Current 
Sauce, Room 225 Kyser Hall. 

Current Sauce, Page 4, October 26, 1982 



MMor Advertising Manager 

Joe ( unnmgham Jr. Alison Breazeale 



Co-News Kditor 
Barhi Hall 

Co-Focus Kdiior 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Kditor' 
Susan Arthur 

Dean Napoli 
Circulation Manager 



Co-News Kditor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Kditor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Kditor 
Dianna Cratton 

Advisor 
Frank Fresson 



Business Manager 
David Saviors 

Co-Focus Kditor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Kditor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Kditor 
l.esa Hatlev 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce is (he official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Natchitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. 1179. 

Current Sauce ts published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and tesiinf periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
arc located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357-54S6. 

Current Sauce subscript ions are $4 yearly. 
»nd extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, (acuity, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern 
Letters must be signed and be no more (nan 
500 words to be considered for publication 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter lor journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU. Natchitoches, Louisiana. 7(457. 



Reagan 's Keeping Cold Company 



Just Another Day In The 
Life Of A Commuter 



Can you imagine coming on campus around 7:30 a.m. and 
being here until 4 p.m. That doesn't seem hard to me after all I 
stay here all week. I can always go to my room, drop my books, 
crash out between classes, and get a sweater if I am cold or 
change clothes if I am too warm. 

Just think if you were a commuter and your classes were over 
at 1:00 but your bus didn't leave until 4:00. You can always go 
to the library, intramural building, or cafeteria. There's also the 
commuter lounge, and the Addition. 

Unfortunately not many people are aware of the existence of 
the commuter lounge. Until I had to do a research paper on the 
commuter problem I was not aware of its existence. If you also 
are unaware of its existence it is located in Room 234 of the 
Student Union Building. 

If you are aware of its existence you're probably not very 
impressed. After all it's not much to talk about. They do have 
some magazines, unfortunately they are four months old 
because someone walked off with the recent ones. After you do 
your homework and have read last year's magazines that doesn't 
leave you with much else to do. You can always read the 
CURRENT SAUCE. Unfortunately that only kills about an 
hour. You may be lucky and the SUGB may be having a nooner 
act but that's not very often either. 

You could walk to (he library or intramural building but if it's 
raining you have to stay in your wet clothes until after you get 
home. If you do that you're likely to get a cold and have to miss 
classes the next few days. You won't have to worry about 
something to do any more because you'll be so busy tryinng to 
catch up in all of your classes. 

Is there a solution to all of this madness? Of course everyone 
could move on campus and eliminate the commuter, but if they 
had wanted to do that they wouldn't be commuting. We could 
continue to do what we've been doing which is ignore their 
existence. What we actually need is a solution to this madness. 
Have you got any ideas?— Diana Gratten 




John Hess 



By John L. Hess 

In a short story by Ring 
Lardner, a kid is heckling his 
father with questions. Then 
comes the immortal line: 
"Shut up," he explained." 
Another former sports 
reporter revived the line at the 
White House the other day. 

Heckled by a 
radical Repu- 
blican can- 
didate, Reagan 
explained, 
"Shut up." 

Outside, the 
heckler said he 
had spoken out " to tell the 
emperor he has no clothes." 

Boy, did he have the wrong 
emperor. 

In fact, White House ad- 
visers are reported to have 
urged the Reagans to lay away 
the whipcord breeches, the 
white tie and tails and the 
rhinestone knickers for the 
duration of the campaign. 

They say the presidential 
lifestyle tends to. clash with 
such administration economy 
efforts as the proposals to 
terminate food subsidies to 
orphans and handicapped 
children, to raise the price of 
school lunches to the"near- 
poor" and to reduce food 
stamps for persons aged 60 
through 64. 

Somehow, people have got 
the idea that this ad- 
minstration is unsymapthetic 
to the poor. Even in the White 



To: Joe Cunningham, Jr. 
Editor, Current Sauce 
From: T.P. Southerland 
Vice President of Academic 
Affairs 

Rather than compliment 
you for an article that really 
strikes your heart, I want to 
say "thank you." It does my 
heart good to know our young 
people-our students share your 
feelings in the tragic loss of 
Caldwell Hall. 

As I stood, helpless, and 
watched it burn to the ground, 
it burned out a part of me 
inside. I have in my lifetime 
suffered moments of tragedy 
of all types, both professional 
and personal, but this one hit 
my wife and me very hard. 
You wrote your article from 
experience built on family ties, 
history, and a heritage. 

You felt the blaze in your 
writing. My wife and I spent 
our undergraduate years 
attending classes in Caldwell. 
We were sweethearts for three 



House, they joke that they 
saved on air conditioning last 
summer by using David 
Stockman's heart. 

The president is not always 
helped by those around him. 
Consider some recent remarks 
by his dedicated friend Clare 
Boothe Luce. 

In an interview in the high- 
priced magazine Geo, Mrs. 
Luce confided that she'd "feel 
a little more compassion" for 
one of her pet birds' than for a 
starving mother and child in 
the Sahara. 

Charity begins at home the 
lady said. And charity, as 
opposed to welfare, is what 
good Reaganauts believe in - 
although the Reagans 
themselves have not given so 
much as to spoil the self- 
reliance of the poor. 

Reagan know what it means 
to be poor. He has observed 
that while he was not raised on 
the wrong side of the tracks, 
he lived near enough to hear 
the train whistles. 

One of the things that 
bothered Mrs. Luce was the 
changing composition of the 
poor. She said, frankly, that 
we were being "overrun" by 
Hispanics. 

Her old protege William F. 
Buckley Jr. fondly rebuked 
her. In a column, he suggested 
that much of what she had 
said was defensible, but her 
"formulation" was regret- 
table. He concluded: 



"There are the deep 
questions Mrs. Luce touches 
on. We should be grateful 
while willing to concede that 
she hasn't said the kind of 
thing that gets you elected to 
Congress. Certainly not in 
Texas, New Mexico, lower 
California or Arizona." 

That may be an encouraging 
remark. Let me explain. 

There is a phenomenon in 
American politics which 
around New York is known as 
Koch 22: Every time Mayor 
Ed Koch was called a racist, 
he'd loudly repeat the charge, 
deny it with indignation - and 
gain votes. 

This fall, it didn't work. 
Koch ran for governor in the 
Democratic primary, was 
rated a shoo-in, made his 
usual skillful campaign 
featuring the death penalty, 
outspent his rival 2 to 1, and 
was beaten decisively. 

It is true that black and 
Hispanic voters did turn out in 
unusual numbers. But other 
Democrats had other issues on 
their minds. As in 
Massachusetts and Ohio, they 
tended to reject Democrats 
tainted with Reaganism. 

That Reagan should be 
heckled by one of his own is 
another sign. We have had 
either too much or not enough 
of Reaganomics, they say. 
how can he reply to that? 

Shut up, he explained. 



Letters to the Editor 



of those wonderful college 
years. We often sat on the old 
bench near the Columns and 
here 1 gave her my fraternity 
pin. As we watched our 
history destroyed Monday 
night, it hurt — for we truly 
love this University. Over half 
of our professional careers 
have been dedicated t* 
creating for Northwestern the 
kind of university your 
grandmother would be proud 
of, your mother, and most of 
all - you. 

The fire may have burned 
some of our spirit, a part of 
our heart, a piece of our 
history, but my wife, Maxine, 
the Director of the Center for 
the History of Louisiana 
Education, and 1, Vice 
President of Academic Af- 
fairs, have renewed our 
commitment to work even 
harder to not let Caldwell burn 
in vain. Thank you for your 
NSU spirit and love for our 
history. 



Dear Joe: 

Your prompt coverage of 
the fire at Caldwell Hall was 
quite a scoop! My com- 
pliments to you for a job well 
done. 

Sincerely, 
Marie Burkhead 



Dear Editor: 

My thanks to Dr. E. Robert 
Black, Director; M.W. 
Atkins, Designer; and the cast 
and production crew of 
Home. The cast com- 
plemented each other 
beautifully, and the audience 
was entranced from the first 
moment. The communal 
spirit that enveloped us all 
must be what theatre is all 
about. So again, to everyone 
concerned, I can no other 
answer make, but thanks and 
thanks and ever thanks. 

Christine Ford 



October 26, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 5 



Commentary 



Former SA UCE 
Editor Featured in 



Your Support Is Appreciated Library Exhibit 



Dr. T.P. Southerland 

Vice President of Academic 

Affairs 

We have experienced a very 
tragic week. I use the word 
"we" as I am positive the 
entire Northwestern family 
shares my sadness and despair. 
The burning of Caldwell Hall 
burned a part of our history 
and a little of each of us. The 
purpose of this is to thank 
many of you for assisting in 
relocating the displaced 
personnel and units that 
resided in Caldwell. Offers of 
furniture, typewriters, files, 
calculators, chairs, and all 



sorts of equipment to help us 
in reestablishing our units 
came in generously. 

I also want to commend 
those persons who, on 
Tuesday morning, were 
without an office -- and it 
became a reality -- Caldwell 
Hall was gone! We met that 
morning and after moments of 
despair they all faced the fact 
that we can't look back but we 
must look ahead. They moved 
into the old Trade School, old 
East Caspari, and the old 
Infirmary and "dug in." That 
afternoon, attired in jeans, 
sneakers, and general "work 



Causey's 
Pharmacy 

Welcomes all NSU 

Students 
Shop our Specials 

and Save 

GO DEMONS 

407 Bienville 352-3141 



he Be#t place 
to find a 
helping hand 
i<5 at the end 
of your arm 




These words to live by have an old-fashioned 
ring, but they apply to the energy situation facing 
us today. It seems.clear that, if we're to meet our 
growing energy requirements, we must rely on 
the technology at hand. And the majority of 
scientists and energy leaders agree that nuclear 
power and coal are the best means of meeting 
these requirements. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

4 i-nr».i( I iHn^.in.t t hi ItM c t*n|<wrt* t .u't M.rii** I Ulilir* 
( ufhfMm l4Hii.i.in.. IWi" A. I ultil * «iniii.im Ni-w ( M#-.tn. I'uMn 



clothes," they moved in. 
Music, Art, and Theatre 
waved as they moved to their 
new Center. They un- 
derstood! My hat is off to our 
new "displaced persons" for 
their attitude and .spirit. I 
want to encourage all of you 
to support them in their effort 
to make a new home. They 
can use all kinds of "odds and 
ins" - even paper clips. 



Thanks to all of you for 
your support and help in this 
tragic week. 



By Pat Skidmore-Co-Focus 
Editor 

Charles Gilbert Stahls, 
editor of the Current Sauce 
from 1940-1942, is one of 25 
featured writers whose 
manuscript book(s) and other 
relevant material are displayed 
in a "Writers Along the 
Cane" exibit in the Cammie 
G. Henry Research Center of 
the Eugene P. Watson 
Library. 

Stahls, a native of Ten- 
nessee, attended Vanderbilt 
University but left after his 
sophomore year to be with his 
family in Louisiana. Later, 
having attended the Normal 
School for two years, Stahls 
resigned his position as editor 



in February 1942 to enlist. 
"Boos and Bouquet," the title 
of his editorial column was 
also the name of a main 
character's radio show, hence 
Stahls decided on Grand 
Bouquet as the novel's title. 
The 372 page typewritten 
manuscript novel was 
published in 1951 and con- 
cerns post-World War II times 
iof the Natchitoches and New 
Orleans areas. The character's 
personalities are similar to 
those of Stahl's family 
members as well as important 
.Natchitoches names of that 
time. He died in 1971, having 
spent many years of his life in 
Palm Desert, California as a 
film-script and real estate 
writer. 



Orchestra Entertains Crowd 



By Beatrice Dawson and Pat 
Skidmore 

The Widespread Jazz 
Orchestra of New York City 
provided entertainment for an 
enthusiastic crowd last 
Tuesday night (Oct. 19) in the 
Student Union Ballroom. The 
musical concert was sponsored 
by the NSU Fine Arts 
Committee of the Student 
Union Governing Board. 

When asked about the 
night's performance, trumpet 
player and vocalist Billy Grey 
stated, "We enjoy being here 
for a nice group of receptive 
people who seem to know their 
jazz, and we've been treated 
very nicely." 

The nine-man musician 
group consists of three 
saxophone players, two 
trumpet players and a 
trombone player, along with a 
bass, a piano, and drum 



players. 

The jazz performers 
highlighted the 2'/2-hour show 
with 21 selections that received 
great approval from the 
listeners. Three were from 
their title albums: "Boogie in 
the Barnyard," which was 
rated number 5 in the National 
Jazz Airplay in Oct. 1980; 
"Time to Jump and Shout," 
which was selected as the 
"Top Jazz LP of the Week" 
by Billboard Magazine in July 
1981; and their last selection 
for the night, "Swing Is The 
Thing," which is their newest 
album that is being released on 
the Adelphi Record Label. 

Four of the selections 
receiving much applause from 
the audience were Duke 
Ellington's "What am I Here 
for," "Happy Feet," "Is you 
is or Is you Ain't My Baby" 
and "Beelzebub." 



The 1 Yi -year-old band has 
produced five successful 
albums-three of which are in 
the United States; one has a 
European label on ii and the 
other one is on the staff's 
record. 

The ensemble has derived 
material from classic jazz 
composition by such artists as 
Duke Ellington, Louis Jordan, 
Jimmy Lunceford, Count 
Basie and Fletcher Henderson 
for their national tour concerts 
at nightclubs and colleges this 
year. In addition, drum player 
John Ellis Jr. has contributed 
over 60% of the original 
arrangements in the band 
book, including his own 
compositions. 

As a result of their 
peformance, the orchestra was 
greeted with a standing 
ovation by the audience. 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities, 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 




In the e.irly cl.iys of electric ity, those words were 
displayed in rooms equipped with the new Ed- 
ison Electric Light Bulbs bee <iuse people thought 
they were unsafe. Some people feel th.it same 
way about nuc lear power today. But after more 
than 2S years of commercial experienc e, not a 
single member of the public has been injured by 
the operation of a nuc lear power plant. An un- 
mak bed safety record. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 



Placement Office 
Government Career Day 
November 4 

The University will host Government Day on 
November 4, 1982. Several agencies will be in- 
terviewing senior and graduate students graduating in 
December, May or July, for employment with the 
Government. 

The interviews will take place in the Student Union 
Building, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. with an hour 
break for lunch. Each interview session is 60 
minutes and begins on the hour. Each session will be 
a group interview and very informative. 

You do not need a file with the Placement Office to 
attend these interviews, HOWEVER YOU MAY COME 
BY THE OFFICE, TO SIGN UP FOR AN APPOINTMENT. 

Agency Ma i ors 

Social Security Administration All Majors 

U.S. Forest Service, Kisatchie NF Forestry 
Dept. of Army: Civilan 

Personnel Office All Majors 

USDA, Soil Conservation Service Agri Business, Soil, 

Science, Agronomy 

Statistical Reporting Service, 
USDA All Agriculatural Majors 

Houston Police All Majors 

Federal Aviation Administration All Majors 

U.S. Department of Treasury, 
Bureau of ATF All Majors 

Federal Bureau of Investigation All Majors 

Internal Revenue Service Business Administration, 

Accounting 

U.S. Marine Corps All Majors 

U.S. Air Force Aviation, Nursing, Weather 

Navy Recruiting District All Majors 

U.S. Army Engineer District IET, Electronics 

NDAA National Weather Service Physics, Math, 

Computer Science 

Barksdale Air Force Base: 

Civilian Personnel Office All Majors 



Sports 



Roger's Voice 

By Roger Reynolds 



State Fair Game Jinx 



Well by now everybody knows 
the result of the annual State 
Fair Classic. The Louisiana 

Tech Bulldogs won their torty- 
ninth game of the classic. Tech 
has only lost nineteen times. 

Along with only losing nineteen 
times, the Bulldogs have won the 
last 11 out of 12 games. The 
only loss for the Bulldogs was in 
1978 when quarterback Kenny 
Philbert engineered a last minute 
96 yard drive that ended in a 
touchdown catch by Randy Liles 
to beat the Bulldogs. Now that 
all the stats and facts are out in 
the open, there is one big 
question that remains unan- 
swered by all Demons and 
Demon fans alike. That big 
question is; Why can't Nor- 
thwestern beat Tech? 



Northwestern for the last four 
years has had just as good of a 
recruiting year as the Bulldogs. 
The Demons have just has good 
of talent on the squad as the 
Bulldogs do, so why can't the 
Demons win. This leads to 
another question, are the 
Demons being out coached by 
the Bulldog coaches and is the 
team being psyched out by the 
game and the Bulldogs them- 
selves? All these questions can 
only be answered by the in- 
dividual fan. No one knows the 
answers to these questions. If 
anyone does know the answer to 
these questions,! wish somebody 
would tell a Demon fan, player 
jr Coach. Everyone wants to 
3eat the Bulldogs, but now we 
ill have to wait to see what next 
ear holds for the Demons. 



Placement Office 
Job Interviews for 
Remainder of Fall Semester 

Interviewing seniors and graduate 
graduating in December, May or July. 
November 3 -- Peat Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 
Accounting 

Government Career Day 
U.S. Air Force 
Prudential Insurance 



students 



November 4 
November 5 
November 8 



November 9 - First National Bank 



All Majors 
A Majors 
Business, Any 
Major 

Accounting, 
Finance 

November 10 L'Oreal Business 
November 1 - U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. Business 
November 17 Chevrolet Central Office 4-year 

Computer Majors 
November 1 8 Creighton University Graudate School 
November 1 8 Dept. of Revenue & Taxation Ac- 

counnng, Business 
November 1 8 Caddo Parish School Board Education 
November 18 Investors Diversified Services 

Business, Any Major 
November 30 Con Agra Business, Accounting, 

Agricultural Degrees 
December 2 South Central Bell Business 

Administration 
Math, Physics, Marketing 
December 3 - U.S. Air Force All Majors 

The Placement Office 
Student Union, Room 305 
357 5621 

Please call or come by and select a time to interview 
if you are interested in any of the compaines. Simply 
stated, we enjoy helping you. Come see us! 



Dogs Dominate 
Demons 33-0 



Louisiana Tech handed 
Northwestern its third loss of the 
season along with its forty-ninth 
loss in the State Fair Classic with 
a 33-0 shutout. This was the 
Bulldogs first shutout since 
1974. 

The Bulldogs were lead by 
quarterback Matt Dunnigan 
who threw for 323 yards on 34 
attempts, 19 completions with 3 
touchdowns and one in- 
terception. Dunnigan also 
rushed the ball for 50 yards. 
Carlton Jacobs lead the 
Bulldogs in rushing with 51 
yards on eight carries with one 
touchdown. Tech amassed a 
total of 550 yards while the 
Demons could only manage 213 
total yards. 

Northwestern's quarterbacks 
had trouble moving the team 
through out the entire game. 
Demon starter Stan Powell 
threw for 113 yards on 26 at- 
tempts, with 11 completions and 
one interception. Senior Bobby 
Herbert added 67 yards on 17 
attempts, 8 completions and 2 
interceptions. Jerry Wheeler 
lead Demon receivers with 80 
yards on 6 catches, while 
number one receiver Victor 
Oatis had only one catch the 
entire game. 

Louisiana Tech came into the 
game ranked fourth in 1-AA and 
they certainly did not hurt their 
ranking, only allowing the 
Demons 213 total yards on 
offense and beating the Demons 
in every category. 

Northwestern's defense had a 
good first half keeping the 
Bulldogs off guard through out 
the first period and giving the 
Demon offense the ball in good 
territory. Demon! safety 
Michael 'Red' Richardson 
was another bright spot on the 
night with one interception, a 

fumble recovery, one pass 
break-up and nine tackles. 
Defensive end David Grappe 
added eight tackles on the night 
and linebacker Mike Camden 
had three tackles and two caused 
fumbles. 

'Louisiana Tech made the big 
plays and we did not', stated 
NSU Head Coach A. L. 
Williams. Bulldog Coach Billy 
Brewer said about quarterback 
Matt Dunnigan, 'I thought he 
did an outstanding job.' Brewer 
also had this to say about the 
Bulldog defensive effort, 'It was 
superb. I am pleased and proud 
of them and 1 know they are 
pleased with the shut-out.' 

Northwestern now falls to 5-3 
while Tech goes to 6-1. The 
Demons now have a week off to 
mend their injuries and to work 
on a game plan for the 
November 6 game against the 
Nichols State Colonels. Let's all 
hope by that time that Nor- 
thwestern can come up with a 
complete team effort. 



- 



Porker Picker Panel ★ 



This 
Week's 
Games 



NSU vs. 
Open Date 



LSU vs. 
Ole Miss 



Tulane vs. 
Baylor 




Roger 
Reynolds 

NSU 
3-0 



LSU 
21-17 



Baylor 
28-14 



Navy vs. 
Notre Dame 



SMU vs. 
Texas A&M 



Stanford vs. 
Washington 

Yale vs. 
Dartmouth 



tmoryat 
Henry vs. 
Hampden 
■ & Sidney ■ 



SMU 
21-14 



Washington 
28-24 

Yale 
28-7 



Hampden 
Sidney 
24-10 



39-21 
.650 




John 

Cunningham 

NSU 
37-0 



LSU 
28-10 



Baylor 
27-13 



SMU 
28-14 



Washington 
31-14 



Yale 
21-14 



Hampden 
& Sidney 
28-10 



37-23 
.617 




Alison 
Breazeale 

NSU 
21-0 



LSU 
27-10 



Bavlor 
28-21 



SMU 
21-17 



Washington 
35-21 

Yale 
28-14 



Hampden 
Sidney 
14-6 



I 



37-23 
.617 




Joe 
Cunningham 

NSU 
21-3 



LSU 
31-14 



Baylor 
35-27 




SMU 
24-14 



Washington 
42-28 



Yale 
35-14 



Hampden 
& Sidney 
27-3 



40-20 
.667 




Scott 
Sledge 

NSU 
20-0 



LSU 
35-14 



SMU 
28-20 



Washington 
24-21 



Yale 
17-14 



Emory & 
Henry 
7-6 



37-23 
.617 




Melanie 
Campbell 

NSU 
50-0 



LSU 
35-7 



Tulane 
21-14 



SMU 
25-10 



Washington 
27-13 



Yale 

33-7 



Hampden 

& Sidney 
36-6 



39-21 
.650 



Reynolds Moves Into Second Place Tie 




Dudlv 
Hall 

NSU 
21-7 



LSU 
21-14 



SMU 
28-14 



Tie 
21-21 

Yale 
21-7 



Tie 
14-14 



35-25 
.583 



Roger Reynolds' last minute 
gambit payed off, and after 
the smoke had cleared in this 
week's Porker Picker Panel 
race, the NSU Sports Editor 
had moved into a second place 
tie with the second guest 
selector. 

Reynolds (6-4) who last 
w eek hired the La. Tech 



Bulldog as guest selector in 
hopes that his malnourished 
brain might bring down the 
unusually high percentages for 
the guest selectors, was this 
week's hero when the Tech 
mascot went 0-10, in a first in 
the history of the P.P. Panel. 
Not even the invincible Bob 
Sj obe r g , in all his 



Tonight 



(Tuesday, October 26) 

A division of the Scott Fetzer Co. will conduct an 
interview for upcoming management positions 
statewide and locally. Full and part-time work 
available. 

p| ace: Business Administration Building, Room 108 
Time: 7:00 pm. Date: Tuesday, October 26 
First impressions are lasting ones, so please dress 
nice. 



ingloriousness managed to 
sink that low. 

Winning the week's picks, 
in his first show of respec- 
tability since the opening 
weekend, was Joe Cun- 
ningham who went 7-3 and 
moved into place. However, as 
brother John pointed out, 
'Just wait till the bowl games, 
he'll choke.' 

Alison Breazeale and John 
Cunningham both had 6-4 
marks and jumped a full two 
games in front of the last place 
mark of 35-25, held by one of 
the guests. 

Beverly Armstrong con- 
tinued the torrid streak put on 
by the guest selector's when 
she tied for first with a 7-3 
worksheet. State Fair Queen 
Kim Kimble, soft-hearted as 
she is, pulled for the un- 
derdogs six times and went 4-6 
for the week. 

At the weekly news con- 



ference, Reynolds announced 
that this weeks guest pickers 
would by Scott 'buy me a 
smaller waist' Sledge and 
Southeastern's transfer and 
Phi Mu's Melanie 'Nel, Nel' 
Campbell along with Dudley 
'thanks for voting for me' 
Hall. Sauce Editor Joe 'I 
can't be nothing else but a 
YANG' Cunningham is really 
in the clouds with his 40-20 
record is trying to pad his lead 
before the bowl games and 
choke time comes around. 
Reynolds and all the other 
panelists are just waiting for 
Cunningham to slip up. 
Brother John 'I like flag 
football' Cunningham also 
believes that brother Joe is due 
to slip up and loose his lead. 
Last but not certainly not least 
is this week's top game a true 
Classic for all to watch for and 
that is Emory and Henry 
facing Hampden and Sidney. 



>ctober 26, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 7 



Thinclads 
Expect High 
Finish 



Northwestern Coach Leon 
Johnson says he hopes his 
cross country team can finish 
in the lop three in the Trans 
America Athletic Conference 
championships, scheduled 
Monday, November I. "Our 
runners are all improving and 
I think we will do well in the 
meet," he said. 

The conference cham- 
pionships, originally 
scheduled for Oct. 30, will 
begin at 10a.m. Northwestern 
State will host the meet which, 
will be run at the NSU 
Recreation Complex. The 
10,000 kilometer race is the 
last cross country meet before 
the Nov. 6 NCAA Region VI 
championships. 

The Demons participated in 
the Louisiana State University 
Invitational in Baton Rouge 
Oct. 15, and they art- 
scheduled to run in the 
Northeast Louisiana 
University Invitational Oct. 
22. Coach Johnson hopes the 
two meets will prove to be 
good preparation for his 
Demons before they enter the 
TAAC championships. 

_ Sophomore thinclad Andy 
Nelson had his best time of the 
1982 Fall season at the LSU 
meet, but Northwestern State 
finished 14th in a field of 15 
teams. 

Nelson finished the five mile 
course with a 27:53 lime for 
47th place among more than 
130 rui; n ers. The top runner 
for the Demons, Nelson 
missed a few meets early in the 
season while nursing a 
sprained ankle. However, 
Job-son said the runner is 100 
percent better. "Andy ran his 
best race of the/ear at LSU. 
He has recovered from his 
injury and he should run even 
better this week," the coach 
said. 

The Northeast Invitational 
will begin at 4:15 p.m. Friday 
and will be run at the Pineville 
Golf Course in Calhoun. The 
meet will host eight schools, 
including teams from 
Mississippi College, Arkansas 
College, Centenary College 
and the University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

Mike Carver has been 
setting practice out this week 
with bronchitis, and he may 
not be able to compete in the 
NLU meet. "Right now we're 
not sure if Mike will get to 
run. He hasn't practice this 
week and the doctor will 
decide Friday if he can run," 
Johnson said. 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX No. 11 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




November 2, 1982 



Bishop Graves, Rev. Watson 
To Celebrate Inaugural Mass 




Bishop Graves 

Rev. Youree Watson, S.J., 
will deliver the homily at the 
Mass beginning the day of 
ceremonies marking the In- 
vestiture of Dr. Joseph Orze as 
fifteenth president of Nor- 
thwestern State University. 
The Mass will be held at the 
Immaculate Conception 
Church on Friday, November 
5, beginning at 8:00 a.m. The 
Most Reverend Lawrence P. 
Graves of the Alexandria- 
Shreveport Diocese will 
preside over the celebration. 
Other participants will include 
Northwestern faculty and 
students, ministers of the 
Uniting Ministries in Higher 
Education and clergy from 




Rev. Watson 

many of Natchitoches 
churches. Dr. Orze remarked 
that he is pleased and felt it to 
be appropriate that a religious 
service begin the day of in- 
vestiture rites and ceremonies 
at the start of his presidency. 

Father Watson, Professor 
of Philosophy at Loyola 
University in New Orleans is a 
Northwestern alumnus. He 
received the bachelor's degree 
in Latin from Spring Hill 
College in Alabama and 
received the doctorate from 
the Gregorian University in 
Rome. An authority on the 
philosophy of relig ion, he was 
named Teacher of the Year of 
Spring Hill College in 1970 



and Outstanding Educator of 
America in 1974. In 1977, 
Father Watson received the 
Award of Merit from the 
Alabama Philosophical 
Society and is celebrating his 
50th anniversary as a Jesuit 
this year. Father Watson is 
the brother of Arthur C. 
Watson of Natchitoches and 
the late Eugen P. Watson, for 
who Northvvestern's Library is 
named. 

Reverend Graves, who 
retired -this summer as Bishop 
of the Alexandria-Shreveport 
Diocese, received degrees from 
the Gregorian University in 
Rome and St. John's 
Seminary in Little Rock. Prior 
to his appointment to the See 
of Alexandria-Shrevepon, he 
served as auxiliary to the 
Bishop of Little Rock. 

Music for the Mass will be 
provided by a choir and string 
quartet composed of Nor- 
thwestern students, faculty 
adn alumni under the director 
of Dr. William Hunt. I ranz 
Schubert's Mass in G will be 
sung. 

All members of the com- 
munity are invited to attend 
the Investiture Mass. 



c - o,,m,u mi. ^unege m iv/u ihc Investiture Mass. 

Activities For Investiture Planned 



Day-long activities have 
been planned for the Nov. 5 
investiture of Dr. Joseph J. 
Orze as the 15th president of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

The program will feature an 
ecumenical mass, reception 
and investiture convocation in 
the morning, a luncheon, 
alumni art exhibit and open 
house at the president's home 
>n the afternoon and the 
President's Concert that night. 

Orze was appointed in 
December of 1981 as 
President-elect of Nor- 
thwestern by the Board of 
Trustees for State Colleges 
and Universities and became 
President June 1 upon the 
retirement of Dr. Rene J. 
Bienvenu, who served for four 
>ears as NSU's chief 
executive. Orze was president 
of Worcester State College in 
Massachusetts for six years 
before his appointement at 
NSU. 

Mrs. Maxine Southerland 
an <J Thomas N. Whitehead are 
eo-chairmen of the inaugural 
committee which is coor- 



dinating activities for the 
investiture programs that is 
being sponsored by Nor- 
thwestern and the NSU 
Alumni Association. All 
activities are open to (he 
public without charge. 

The ecumenical mass will be 
at 8 a.m. at the Immaculate 
Conception Catholic Church 
in Natchitoches. Bishop 
Lawrence P. Graves of the 
Alexandria-Shreveport Dioc- 
ese will preside over the 
celebration, which will include 
a sermon by the Rev. Youree 
Watson, an NSU alumnus 
w ho is professor of philosophy 
at Loyola University in New 
Orleans. Music for the mass 
will be performed by the 
Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Chorale, conducted by Dr. 
William A. Hunt. 

The City of Natchitoches 
and the Natchitoches Parish 
Chamber of Commerce will 
host the reception for Orze 
and his wife, Carol, beginning 
at 9 a.m. at the Lemee House 
on Jefferson Street. 

Scheduled for 10 a.m. in 
Prather Coliseum is the in- 



vestiture convocation, in 
which Board of Trustees 
president Wiley H. Sharp Jr. 
of Hammond will formally 
install Orze as president of 
NSU. The ceremonies will be 
highlighted by a keynote 
address by Dr. Allan Ostar, 
president of the American 
Association of State Colleges 
and Universities. 

Presenting salutory remarks 
during the investiture con- 
vocation will be Dr. William 
Junkin, executive director of 
the Board of Trustees for State 
Colleges and Universities; Dr. 
William Arceneaux, executive 
director of the Louisiana 
Board of Regents for Higher 
Education; Raymond Arthur 
of Natchitoches, president of 
the NSU Alumni Association; 
Dr. Maxine Taylor, president 
of the NSU Faculty Senate, 
and Joseph Slamcy of Nat- 
chitoches, president of the 
university's Student Govern- 
ment Association. 

Local, parish and state 
elected officials, students, 
faculty and staff members, 
alumni and the general public 



NSU Artist Series 
Opens With Luboff 



Norman Luboff, the in- 
ternationally- acclaimed 
choral conductor and com- 
poser, will bring his famous 
choir to Northwestern tonight 
Tuesday, Nov. 2, tor a concert 
which will open the I982-S3 
NSU Artist Series. 

The performance by the 
Norman Luboff Choir Begins 
at 8 p.m. in the Concert 
Recital Hall of Norlhwestci n's 
new A. A. Fredericks Center 
for the Creative and Per- 
forming Arts. Tickets for the 
event arc $5 for adults and $3 
for students, children and 
senior citzens. 

Season tickets to attend the 
Artist Series opener as well as 
the season's three other fine 
arts attractions will be on sale 
Tuesday night at the recital 
hall's box office. They are 
priced at $10 for adults and $5 
for adults and $3 lor students, 
children and senior children. 

f ollow ing the concert b\ rhe 
Norman Luboff Choir, the 
NSU Artist Series will present 
the Belgian Chamber Or- 
chestra Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. in the 
Concert Recital Hall, 
playwright Edward Albee's 




Norman Luboff 

drama, "Who's Afraid of 
Virginia Wool!'?," March 16- 
19 at 7:30 p.m. in l ine Arts 
Auditorium and organist 
Frederic Swann April 13 ai 
8:30 p.m. in the Concert 
Recital Hall. 

"The Norman I obolf 
Choir is ccrtianly rlie most 
outstanding professional vocal 
■group louring America 
today." said NSU Artist Scries 
chairman lonv C. Smith of 
lh« university's Music 
Department facility. "We feel 
especially fortunate to have 
them at Nortltwcsteti i<> launch 
out 1982-83 season." 



Clarification Of Financial Aid 



Since the fire at (a Id well Hall, student uncertain!} about 
Financial Aid has been a problem. Hie financial Aid office has 
printed a statement, which can be found in ihc S A I J C 1 ihis 
week, that details what students who receive financial aid should 
do. 

All students who have been awarded federal financial Aid 
Pell (BLOG) Cram , College Work Study, SI OG. NDSI . or 
SIG) do noi need lo do anything. Replacement Pell (Irani 
reports and ACT Need Analysis reports have been requested for 
you and will be mailed to our office. Replacement vcrilicalion 
Jocuments are not rquircd for those students already receiving 
inancial aid. 

Students who have not been awarded a Pell Gram must 
:ontaci the Pell Grant Office, Box 92440, 1 os Angeles, ( A 
90009 and request duplicate copies of their Pell Grant reports. 

Those students may also call 8OO-638-670O and request the 
duplicated copies. Verification documents may be requested by 
the this office. You should bring the duplicate copies and 
verification documents (if requested) by our office as soon as 
possible. 

Replacement ACT Need Analysis copies have been requested 
or all students and will be mailed lo this office. 

Students will need lo come by ihc financial Aid Office and 
renew their aid for the Spring semester. II any slutlenis had 
renewed their aid before Ihc lire, they are requested lo come by 
and renew ii again. 

II a siudenl does not plan to enroll at NSU for the Spring 
semester, they are asked to contact I he financial Aid office in 
Roy Hall so thai financial Aid may award their financial aid 
package lo some other deserving student. 



Current Sauce, Page 2, November 2, 1982 



Greeks Hold Drive for Christmas Festival 



By Pal Skid more, Co-Focus 
Editor 

A city service project, 
"NSU Greeks - Partners in 
Progress," was conducted by 
eight social fraternities and 
sororities. The drive was held 
last Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 
26 in an effort to decrease 



costs of the 1982 Christmas 
Festival. 

The Greeks, standing at 
street intersections with cans, 
asked for donations while they 
gave out stickers and pam- 
phlets about the festival. A 
total of $563.44 was collected 
according to Janice Duggan, 






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LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES INVESTING 
IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

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sludii'd lull tint it flow noni'.OI lift"*' miiihc^ is 
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LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES INVESTING 
IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 



Coordinator of the Greek 
Festival Drive. 

Organizations participating 
were Kappa Alpha Psi, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, 
Phi Beta Sigma, Delta Sigma 
Theta, Sigma Kappa, Phi Mu 
and Tri Sigma. 

There will be another drive 
like this one on Nov. 16 from 
1-4 p.m. Duggan said that 
since students are such a big 
part of the festival, she felt 
they would enjoy helping out 
especially since it is something 
that draws so many people to 
Natchitoches each year. 

A similar drive was held 
during this past spring's Greek 
Week in which the amount 
collected was given to the NSU 
Children's Center. 

Admissions 
Losses Great 

By Pat Skidmore 

"The first thing I thought ot 
was names;if I could've just 
gotten the names of people in 
that little box." That was the 
initial reaction to the fire in 
Caldwell Hall, from Curtis 
Wester, Director of Ad- 
missions. 

The functions of the Ad- 
missions office now located in 
Caspari Hall, includes the 
handling of undergraduate 
admissions for new, transfer, 
and re-entering students, 
admissions for talented high 
school students, scholarship 
application (proceesing), and 
the mailing out of in- 
formation/ catalogues. 

Wester stated, "The biggest 
lost to me as well as to Randy 
Nichols, Enrollment Manager 
was the 9,000 names, ad- 
dresses and phone numbers of 
prospective NSU students." 
This information was recorded 
on magnetic discs from a word 
processor machine. The discs 
were filed in boxes. 

He emphasized how nice 
people have been and their 
generosity in donating such 
items as desks, cabinets, chairs 
and even simple things like 
paper clips. "CPT Cor- 
poration in Alexandria offered 
us a word processor the day 
after the fire," Wester said. 



P re-registration Scheduled 
For November 22 



Starting on November 22, 
Northwestern students, for the 
first time, will be able to pre- 
register for the next semester's 
classes. 

According to Dr. Austin 
Temple, NSU Registrar, this 
"big step forward" will 
guarantee a schedule when the 
process is completed, and if it 
is done right. 

The advanced registration is 
open for those students who 
are enrolled on this campus 
this fall. Hopefully, Dr.- 
Temple says, other NSU 



campuses will be able to enjoy 
pre-registration in the neat 
future, under a different 
system. 

The first important date to 
remember is November 10, 
and that is the day that Spring 
schedules will become 
available. Starting November 
11, NSU students should begin 
meeting with their adviser's 
and setting up a trial schedule. 

Registration begins on 
November 22 at noon, and 
starts with students whose last 
name begins with M. 



Rebuilding of Caldwell 



By Pat Skidmore 

The near completed 
reorganization plan for NSU 
and the rebuilding of Caldwell 
Hall were key topics in an 
interview with President 
Joseph J. Orze. 

Orze will talk about the 
philosophy of the university's 
reorganization proposal 
during his investiture on Nov. 
5. He said that the proposal 
will appear, in about a month, 
in the form of an 
"organizational chart with 
written rationale as to the 
changes and ways of im- 
plementing them." In an 
earlier interview, he had said 
this reorganization, both 
academically and ad- 
ministratively, was one of his 
long term goals and these 
types of changes would be 
gradual ones. 

Orze commented on 
Caldwell Hall's fire and how it 
was such a great loss to many 
because of its sentimental and 
historic value. "We want to 
make the outside look like it 
did, and we will actually build 
it from the old bricks, even 
using the original doorway." 

In regard to enrollment, 
there is an increase in the 
number of full-time un- 
dergraduate students. "This 
was the first time we have had 
an increase in this direction in 
years," stated Orze. NSU's 
3.6% decrease in enrollment 
as compared to last fall 
semester's figures, is largely 
due to indecision as to whether 



t ffiri.ii i on 
I . 'iiiti.ni.i i'< 



m.i I hei ifu ( i>iitfi.ii 
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Read 



The 



SAUCE 



Treen would pass the Pips Bill. 

There is a decrease in Pip 
program enrollment. The 
number of dormitory residents 
in about the same. 

Orze returned from Poland 
on Oct. 21 with an agreement 
signed by a delegation of the 
American Association of State 
Colleges and Universities 
(AASCU) and the Polish 
Ministry of Science, Higher 
Education and Technology. 
The leader of the 5-member 
delegation, Orze has been a 
member of the AASCU Board 
of Directors since 1978. 
Terms outlining the 
educational exchange of 
faculty, students and 
equipment were discussed 
there. 

He concluded in saying, 
"I'm pleased to be back in the 
country, I was upset by the 
news of Caldwell Hall and 
budget cuts, yet very im- 
pressed by everyone on 
campus who has pulled 
together to make the best of 
what has happened." 



will attend the event, which 
will be the university's second 
formal inaugural program 
since Dr. John S. Kyser was 
installed as president in 1954. 

An informal luncheon 
honoring Orze will follow the 
investiture convocation in the 
Student Union Ballroom. 
Tickets are $7 and will be 
available through Nov. 3 from 
Dr. John L. Hix, acting dean 
of the College of Business. 



-- HELP WANTED-- 
Earn FREE Travel 
and Extra Money 
as a Campus 
Representative 
for Student Travel 
CALL JIM 
at 

617-383-9560 dai I y 
617-545-6604 after 6 



November 2, 1982, Current Sauce, Pane 3 



NAP 

Northwestern Association 
of Photographers will meet 
Thursday night at 8:00 p.m. in 
room 106, Arts and Sciences 
Building. According to Jay 
Ham, a guest speaker might be 
on hand. All students in- 
terested in photography are 
invited to attend. 

Phi Mu 

The L.adybug's would like 
to congratulate Angela 
Lasvone and Lynn Clary on 
winning tennis doubles and 
Angela on winning tennis 
singles. Watch out Sigma 
Kappa, we're only 150 points 
behind! 

The Phi Mu's held their 
annual Grub Dance Saturday 
night, with host .left' Edmund 
of KEEL. We sure had t hat 
r o o f rocking! 
Congratulations also go to 
Kim Kimble, State Fair Queen 
and Anna Cloulier, Stale Fair 
Court. Also to Molly 
Dranguet lot being selected as 
Natchitoches Mardi Gras 
Queen. 

Tri-Sigma 

Tri Sigma would like lo 
congratulate all the girls w ho 
were selected lo perform on 
the Pom-pom line this year. 
We also want lo wish lots of 
luck to t he girls who were 
nominated for Miss NSU. we 
arc very proud of all these 
ladies. Last weekend was the 
lime for our annual Harvest 
Dance. The bonfire the night 
b c f o re at C a p p y 
Prudhomme's house set the 
mood for a spirited parly and 
n\ Friday we were all ready for 
(he dance. Tri Sigma wants 10 
thank all those Demons who 
made our gas raffle a success. 



Organizations 



Delta Zeta 

Leigh I a Rose was recently 
elected Theta Chi Little Sis 
and Susie Detiveaux, Amy 
Viator. Laura Viator, and 
Denise Chance were elected 
T.K.E. Little Sisters. 
Christine Avanl was recently 
elected president of the newly 
reactivated Sigma Tau Delta 
organization. Pam Strange, 
Susan Scoggins and Tanna 
Colbertare in the Spirit of 
Northwestern Demon Mar- 
ching Band. We had a 
window wash. We had an 
exchange with the T.K.E.'s 
Thurs., Oct. 28 and our pledge 
class started Sport Sis with the 
active chapter. A final and 
most important activity was 
our Founder's Dav celebration 
Monday, Oct. 26. Ai Mrs. 
Ruth Makar's, one of our 
most beloved and 
distinguished alumae, home. 



SLAE 

The Student Louisiana 
Association of Educators will 
hold their next meeting 
November 2 at 6:00 p.m. in 
the Teacher Education Center. 
The guest speaker will be Mrs. 
Posey from the Professional 
Development Center at 
Northwestern. Mrs. Posey 
will discuss how the 
Professional Development 
center can assist presently 
employed teachers as well as 
students of education. All 
education majors are en- 
couraued to attend. 



Sigma Kappa 



Sigma Kappa sorority had a 
Halloween party with 
Riverside Nursing Home on 
Thursday, October 28. The 
chapter, dressed in Halloween 
costumes, visited a n d 
celebrated October birthdays 
with the residents of the local 
nursing home. 

The Sigma Kappa sisters are 
looking forward to parent's 
weekend on November 5-7, 
when they will have an open 
house for sorority parents 
followed by the game and a 
pam . The open house w ill 
start off Sigma Kappa's Week 
of Giving which celebrates our 
founding date, November 9, 
1874. 



Pathfinders 

The NSU "Pathfinders" 
Orienteering Team par- 
ticipated in the Sam Houston 
Invitational Orienteering Meet 
in Huntsville, Texas 23-24 
October 1982. The Path- 
finders Red team category 
(Colleges) was 5th out of 12 
teams. Gina Kyle won 1st 
place in the (orange) female 19 
years old and above. There 
were 88 runners registered for 
the orange course. Joe 
Sepulvado was 7th and Gerry 
Snelson was 15th in the (red) 
male 21 and older course, with 
71 registered runners, and 
Law son Adams was 10th in 
the (red) males 19-20 advanced 
category. 

Gina Kyle was in seend 
place in the F19-categorv the 
first day, but "blew away" the 
competition the second day 
with a course lime of 75 
minutes. Her overall course 
lime was 205.33 leaving the 
nearest competitor behind by 
30 minutes. Not bad lot ony 
her second competition! 

The Pathfinders will 
represent NSU again 20-21 in 
November 1982 at the 
Arkansas Tech Orienteering 
meet in Russelville, Arkansas, 
and are building the team as a 
strong contender for the 
National Competiton next 
spring. 



Advising for P.E. Majors 

Advisement for Advanced registration for the Spring 
Semester for Physical Education Majors (including 
Pre-Physical Therapy) will be held in the PE Majors 
Building Thursday, November 11, 1982, 8:00 A.M- 
9:15 A.M. and Tuesday, November 16. 8:00 A.M.-9:15 
A.M. If you have a class at these times make an 
appointment with your Advisor. 



Important News From 
Financial Aid 

If you have been awarded Federal Financial Aid (Pell 
BEOG Grant, College Work Study, SEOG, NDSL, or 
SSIG) no action is necessary at the present time. 
Replacement Pell grant reports and ACT Need Analysis 
reports have been requested for you and will be mailed 
to our office. Replacement verification documents are 
not required for those students already receiving 
financial aid. 

Students who have not been awarded a Pell Grant 
must contact the Pell Grant Office, P.O. Box 92440, Los 
Angeles, CA 90009 and request duplicate copies of 
their Pell Grant reports. You may also call 800-638- 
6700 and request the duplicated copies. Verification 
documents may be requested by this office. Please 
bring the duplicate copies and verification documents 
(if requested) by our office as soon as possible. 
Replacement ACT Need Analysis copies have been 
requested for all students and will be mailed to this 
office. 

Students will need to come by the Financial Aid 
Office and renew their aid for Spring. If you renewed 
your aid before the fire, please come by and renew it 
again. If you do not plan to enroll for Spring '83, please 
contact this office in order that we may award your 
financial aid package to some other deserving student. 



Periaktoi 

The NSU Periaktoi Club 
enjoyed its first field trip of 
the semester last Thursday. 
The trip included a visit to St. 
Mary's school in Boycc, a tour 
of the Louisiana Training 
Institute in Ball, as well as a 
tour of the youth facilities at 
the Central Hospital of 
PinevHIe. 

Al Periaktoi's regular 
meeting, October 26, several 
community projects were 
voted on in regard to the 
upcoming holiday season. 
Other items discussed were; 
the purchase of personalized 
T-shirts and a Christmas 
party. 

Periaktoi also gained lout 
new members, they are Floyd 
James, Sandra lee, Doris 
Nietto and Lisa Gut- 
schenretta. Welcome' 



TKE 

The brothers of the Nor- 
thwestern State University 
chapter of TKE went on our 
annual Retreat over the 
Halloween weekend. The 
retreat is for the new pledges 
to gel a better understanding 
of the fraternity and the 
people in it. Everything went 
according to plan and all the 
TKE's there had a great lime. 
To all of the alumni who 
came, a thank you is extended. 

Volleyball is starting this 
week and TKE has two teams 
entered in he competition. 
The number 2 team is loo big 
we've been practicing for it 
and both teams are in top 
shape for the season. 

We also held an exchange 
with the D/S ibis pas! 
Thursday. An appropriate 
theme of horror was on force. 



Dear Students: 

Below are the new standards tor "good standing and 
satisfactory progress'' effective Fall 1982 for continued receipt 
of financial assistance at NSU. 

A student must have an overall 2.00 GPA in the four ma|or 
subjects (English, Math, Social Science, and Social Studies) in 
order to be in "Good Academic Standing" to qualify for financial 
assistance as a Freshman. To continue receiving financial 
assistance a student must make satifactory acsademic 
progress. This calls for a student to maintain a 1.50 GPA the 
first year in college. The second year a student must maintain a 
1.75 GPA. After the second year the student must maintain a 
2.00 GPA to continue receiving financial assistance. If a 
student fails to maintain the required GPA (in order to continue 
receiving financial assistance), he or she will not receive 
financial assistance for the following semester. The student 
must make a 2.00 GPA and enroll in the same number of hours 
as the previous semester in order to make satisfactory progress 
and receive financial assistance the following semester. 
Transfer Students 

Transfer students are required to comply with the above 
standards of satisfactory progress in order to receive financial 
assistance at NSU. 

Time Limits on Financial Aid Eligibility 

A student may receive financial aid for a maximum of five years 

(10 semesters) in order to complete a four year degree program. 



From the 
Registrar's Office... 

1 The repeat rule is effective starting m the spring semestei 
This rufe means that the second grade will cotinl as ihe final 
grade On youi transcript, a line will tic typed tin oiKjht he 
course that has been repeated and a "H .vill be placed m die 
lot! maigin by die course 

2 It a student fails to satisfactorily complete a developmental 
course in 3 attempts, the student will be permanently 
suspended from NSU. (Reading 98 99 100 Math 1T)0 I nglisli) 

3 When a Freshman oi Sophomore locoives excessive 
unexcused absences (10% of total classes; the instructor may 
recommend to the student s academic dean thai the .■udeo! be 
withdrawn frpm the rolls ot thai class and given the appmpnaio 
grade (10% of MWT classes !ii days absent, and 10"., ot I ffi 
classes is 3 days absent) 

Read The SAUCE for info on Pre Registration. 



Opinion 

The Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the 
author's. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
University, its administration, the students or even the rest of 
the Current Sauce staff. The Current Sauce invites letters to the 
editor, which must be signed, as well as guest editorials, which 
must also be signed. Address all correspondence to Current 
Sauce, Room 225 Kyser Hall. 

Current Sauce, Page 4, Novemoeri, 1982 




Kicking Your Own Bucket 



Pre-registration 

You did it, and don't deny it. It's all because ot you, Nor- 
thwestern students, that for the first time, we will have a pre- 
registration. 

Starting at 12 noon, on 'vionday, November 22, in the Student 
Union Ballroom, all currently enrolled NSU-Natchitoches 
campus students will be able (o register for spring classes, 
provided (hat they have correctly followed the required steps 
leading up to registration. 

[)r. Austin Temple, Northwestern's hard-working Registrar, 
calls this, "A big step forward." And rightly so. Those long 
lines in August and January, the interminable wait, the absolute 
boredom, were all bitter pills. Now, registration ought to be 
much easier. 

Of course, no one can expect it run absolutely smoothly, kinks 
still have to be worked out, but the improvement will be very, 
very noticeable. 

Dr. Temple hones thai two thousand NSU students take 
advantage of pre-registration, and for those who do, and who 
follow all the necessary steps leading up to pre-regislration, a 
guaranteed schedule will be theirs for the spring semester. 

There is hope (hat in the future, other NSU campuses, i.e. 
Warrington, Fori Polk, can enjoy the same pre-registration 
advantage (hat we have, but lor them, thai will have to be under 
a different system. 

l or those graduating seniors who might be worried that by the 
lime they get lo sign up for their classes, it might be filled and 
they would have lo postpone graduation, fear not. The 
department heads will be able (o accomodate special cases like 
that. However, it should be noted, that if you area last semester 
senior who needs a 100 level, or a lower 200 level course, that has 
been offered every semester that you have been here. ..TOUGH. 

All in all, we should pat ourselves on the back for generating 
enough talk, and ultimately action of prc-rcgistration, but let's 
also give credit where credit is due, and applaud the efforts of 
President Or/eand Dr. Temple. Thanks guys! 



Letter Policy 



l or all of you dear folks who so graciously give of your lime 
io write letters to Ihe SAUCE, we thank you. Bui there is just 
one thing. They are all unsigned, with a lew exceptions. It is the 
policy of this paper not to print anything by an anonvmous 
author. We will withhold names in certain cases, il you ask us 
to, or so specify on your letter, but we will not run letters that 
come into this office signed. Embarrassed at NSU. or something 
like il. 

Please, we encourage letters, we will prim anything that is not 
libelous, or purely distasteful, but please sign il if vou want to 
see il in prim. 



John Hess 

Tom Kean, the young 
governor of New Jersey, is a 
practical fellow. No sooner 
did he sign a bill restoring 
capital punishment than he 
tackled the next question: 
how to go about it. 

New Jersey's previous 
method was electrocution. But 
frankly, it smells. As every 
motorist who has passed 
through the Garden State 
knows, it doesn't need another 
stench. 

Other methods in con- 
temporary use include the 
noose, the guillotine, and the 
garrote, but all seem nearly as 
old hat as the stake and the 
headman's ax. 

Utah uses a firing squad, 
but its productivity is low: It 
requires several executioners 
instead of one. Also, the 
movies have endowed it with a 
glamour that may reduce its 
value as a deterrent. Indeed, 
one ontorious killer refused to 
be deprived of the honor. 

California is as ever an 
innovator. It uses poison gas, 
an idea that may have been 
suggested by the atmosphere 
around Los Angeles. 

But Kean (pronounced 



Cain) is even more avan- 
tgarde. He proposes a method 
that's right in tune with our 
times - the needle. 

Presumably, the prisoner 
could opt for a sniff or a snort 
or a pill, whichever is his or 
her favorite means of chemical 
uplift. 

Kean says injection would 
be nearly painless, and hence 
more humane than the electric 
chair. But then what happens 
to deterrence? 

How many potential killers 
would fear the needle more 
than life in a New Jersey 
prison? Kean says he thinks 
some would, but he admits he 
can't prove it. 

After all, 50,000 Americans 
incur the death penalty every 
year on the highways, yet it 
seems only a feeble deterrent 
to drunk and reckless driving. 
Highway patrols, speed limits, 
safety checks, stiff fines and 
revocation of licenses seem to 
work better than the threat of 
physical injury. 

Deterrent or not, capital 
punishment is certainly 
popular. New Jersey is the 
37th state to restore it. If 



they'd sell tickets, they'd do a 
bigger gross than horror 
movies. 

Not so long ago, hangings 
were an important item of 
public entertainment. In the 
absence of handguns, murder 
was relatively scarce, so many 
lesser crimes as picking 
pockets qualified for the 
gibbet. 

One of the favorite places 
for pickpockets to work was, 
obviously, in a crowd wat- 
ching a hanging. 

So much for deterrence. 
Nevertheless, there is the 
amusement factor, the moral 
uplift and the sense of godlike 
power that comes from the 
knowledge that we have ex- 
tinguished one of our fellow 
sinners. 

Another argument may be 
expecially telling in New 
Jersey. Its high rate of 
unemployment must surely be 
affecting one of its substantial 
industries: organized crime. 

The restoration of capital 
punishment is a job opening 
for at least one cold-blooded 
killer for hire. Applications 
should be addressed to the 
State House in Trenton, N. J. 



Letter to The Editor 



■Letter* 



Dear Editor: 

A.L. Williams was fired by 
Dr. Joseph Orze because he 
was unable to recruit enough 
quality players to compete on 
a year to year basis with the 
likes of Louisiana Tech, 
Northeast, or McNeese; 
Maybe it wasn't entirely his 
fault. Perhaps the ad- 
ministrators and alumni of 
Northwestern are more at 
fault for the athletic failures of 
the University then the 
coaching staff. 

Recruiting should be an easy 
task for an NSU coach. 
Northwestern has a beautiful, 
modern athletic complex. The 
school has recently placed 
several players in the 
professional ranks and several 
of this year's players will have 
a chance to play 
professionally. The coaching 
staff spends numer ous and 
long hours away from their 
homes and families trying to 
recruit players who will make 
Northwestern a winner. Yet 



most of the top players never 
seriously consider coming to 
NSU. Why? 

What does Northwestein 
have to offer to the student 
athlete? Are there 
professional curriculums such 
as engineering or pharmacy? 
How does Northwestern's 
College of Business rate when 
compared to Northeast or 
Louisiana Tech? Why are 
high cost, low student count 
curriculums housed in 
beautiful surroundings while 



As Mr. and Miss NSU 
elections are just around the 
corner, tomorrow to be exact, 
some people are already 
deciding on who they are 
going to vote for while others 
are deciding their cogitation 
for not voting. 

The art of voting at Nor- 
thwestern is very phlegmatic. 
People's excuses range from 



"didn't have enough time to 
vote" to "it rained during the 
lime the polls were open" to 
"I didn't know any of the 
candidates." 

Voting is a privilege, as 
well as, a right. Regardless, of 
if you want a change on 
campus or your friend is 
running for an office, your 
vote plays a major role in a 



candidate(s) getting elected. 

Remember on tomorrow, 
that wise people vote because 
they feel their vote can bring 
about a change, fools do not 
vote because they do not know 
how to change. Which 
category will you fall in? 

Dudlev Hall 



the majority of students have 
to attend classes in shabby, 
run down classrooms? Is it 
A.L. Williams' fault that 
student are housed in second 
rate dorms? 

It's time for Northwestern's 
family of administrators, 
faculty, and alumni to wake 
up. Unless something is done, 
we won't have to worry a;.out 
the record of the football 
team. Schools that are closed 
due to a lack of students don't 
play football. 
Name withheld by request. 



i r EA ) tOT . , Advertising Manager 
Joe Cunningham Jr. A | ison Br eazeale 



Co-News [Cditor 
Barbi Hall 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Editor 
Susan Arthur 

Dean Napoli 
Circulation Manager 



Co-News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Dianna Gratton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatley 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Sauce rs the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
University in Naichitoches. Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class Butter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March J. 1879. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
(he exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session, it is 
printed ■! the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches. Louisiana 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is JJ7-3456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Naichitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any wav slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce, NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 



November 2, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 5 



Commentary 

Dorm-life Complaints 



It seems like every semester 
there is a new complaint with 
dormitory students. Either the 
air conditioners are broken, 
the heaters are broken, the 
rooms are flooding, or there's 
no toilet paper. Well, all those 
problems are back, plus a few 
new ones. 

I don't know about you, but 
getting up at 3:00 in the 
morning for a fire drill is not 
exactly my idea of a good 
time. Last week the fire alarm 
went off three times in Nat- 
chitoches Dorm. I understand 
the importance of fire drills, 
especially after the Caldwell 
Hall tragedy, but how many 
times do we have to stand out 
in the cold in bare feet and 
robes? What really got me 
was during the last fire drill 
the apathy of the residents was 
evident and I don't blame 
them. Who believes there is a 
real fire? If there ever was one 
most of the students would 
probably just stay in bed. 

To the person who runs 
around pulling the alarms for 



fun: I assure you that pulling 
fire alarms will not make you 
instantly popular or give you 
that much sought-after secret 
to success, so I would ap- 
preciate it if you divert that 
excess energy into something 
more constructive. You won't 
think it's so funny if you cost 
someones life one day. 

The other earth-shattering 
problem in Natchitoches 
Dorm is the absence of one of 
life's sustaining elements... the 
maids. 

I don't mind sharing my 
clothes with my roommate, I 
don't mind sharing my 
Snickers with my friend, and I 
don't mind sharing my 
statistics notes with my 
classmates, but I positively 
refuse to share my maids with 
another dorm. 

Have you ever tried waking 
up (between fire drills) in the 
wee hours before dawn, and 
cutting a path through the 
trash piled up in the hall to go 
to the bathroom? What is 
worse is. after the fact, finding 

< wwr* 



out that because the maids 
didn't come today there is no 
toilet paper. I mean toilet 
paper is one of those things a 
person just shouldn't have to 
do without. 

I have the perfect solutions: 
1. Get. maids for every dorm. 
Goodness, I'm paying $345.00 
a semester to live in a dorm, I 
refuse to take out my own 
trash. What is my .345.00 
being used for? It can't be 
going into fixing the air 
conditioners or the heater; and 
heaven knows it's not being 
used to clean or fix the 
showers. 

2. Cut down on the fire 
drills. I've had enough of 
standing outside in my shortie 
PJ's in 40 degree tem- 
peratures. I appreciate 
someone's interest in seeing 
how fast a sleepy, 115 pound 
coed can run down two flights 
of stairs at 3:00 am, but 
believe me, if I smell smoke 
I'll do my darnest to get out 
fast and all in one piece. 



Student A pplauds Widespread Jazz 9 



In the 6 years that I have 
been attending NSU, I had not 
yet heard such perfection, 
harmony and precision from 
any of the "band" concerts 
held in the past until I was 
fortunate enough to attend the 
Jazz Concert held during the 
State Fair Week festivities. 
"The Widespread Jazz Or- 
chestra" concert was one of 
the highlights of my present 
semester and past college days. 

Besides their great music, 
each of the nine members had 
a special and interesting 
personality which could be felt 
in their music as they per- 
formed solos with different 
instruments. The vocals were 
outstanding. With their 
headquarters being located in 
New York, they have been 
traveling long and hard hours 
but still, they perform with a 
refreshing style and are all true 
Northern gentlemen. There 
were comments of "southern 
bells" and the colonial style 
homes. They all seemed to be 



up on the history of Nat- 
chitoches but said that they 
were on the road too much to 
tour all there was to see. 

After the concert their first 
concern was food and lodging, 
not to mention partying some. 
They had arrangements to stay 
at the El Camino. After 
checking in and changing 
clothes all but two of the 
members proceeded to walk in 
the direction of Domino's 
Pizza. This walking tour 
included 3 washaterias, 1 7- 
1 1, and a pit stop by the pizza 
place which promptly 
delivered pizza's right across 
the street to the "Rustic Inn." 
The evening then consisted of 
food, spirits, conversation, 
pool and darts. 

After retiring from the Inn 
only two jazz members where 
still hanging in there. The next 
adventure consisted of wat- 
ching "The Life of Riley" and 
"Beach-Party." They then 
left for their lodgings. The 
next morning consisted of 



breakfast and a discussion of 
Caldwell Hall (which was in 
the headlines of the 
Shreveport morning paper). 
They said that their tour had 
been rough and hectic at times 
but they were delighted with 
Natchitoches and the warm 
reception that followed. As 
they headed for Texas for their 
next concert, they commented 
that they would like to return 
again to Natchitoches and 
again play to an audience that 
showed appreciation for the 
arts, music, and friendship. 

Those who missed "The 
Widespread Jazz Orchestra" 
truely missed a celebration of 
jazz at its finest. I extend 
many thanks to the f int Arts 
committee for such a 
delightful evening and place a 
request for an encore per- 
formance in the near future. 

Shannon Cole and Friends. 



The Student Government Association wa- 
called to order by Stacy Soileau ai 6:00 p.m. 
[jerry Anderson said Ihe praser and Boh 
scarce led the pledge. Scon Repp mosed lo 
2rJP* n *j* with ihe reading of ihe minutes, 
'odd Eppler seconded. Motion passed. 
Absent were: Noel Nicholle. Pcvlon Cun- 
ningham. David Saslors, Mars Bitlick. and 
Kobcn Stormcnl. 
OFFICER RtPORTS 

Joe Slamey ihanked everyone lor helping 
nil c c ' air Weekend. He announced thai 
'he SCiA class vsill mcel Wednesday at 2:00 
MJ- He said lhal ihe Caldwell Hall offices 
lave relocated. Joe met ssith the alumni and 
talked about starling an SSL Ambassador 
Club sshich ssould be siudenis ihai ssould go 
out and recruit for Northsscstcrn. Joe also 
assigned the committee chairman of the 
senate. He told them to meet ivsice a month 



and reporl lo Ihe SCiA once a month. The 
senate C hairman arc: 

SOCIAL PROGRAMS Kim Kimble 

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL 
STANDARDS -Susan Johnson 

ARTIST SERIES -Kasla Murphs 

ASSEMBI V AND DISTINGUISHED 
I ECTURER- -DonSlacv 

C AMPUS BEAUTIFK ATION- Kim Brenl 

BROAIX ASTING -1 csa Hallcs 

HOUSING-- Donna Jo Kcllv 

FOOD SERVIC ES- Bob I'carce 

SPIRIT -I auric Weaver 

DISCIPLINE -Stall Repp 

BUDGET -Dudlex Hall 

LIBRARY-- Todd Eppler 

STUDENT PUBLIC AT IONS- -Eileen 
Hasnes 

STUDENT WELI ARE- -Troy Dasidson 
STI IDF NT RIGHTS AND I EGA I AID- 



John W illiams 

CAMPUS SECURITY AND TRAFFIC ~ 
Dean Napoh 

STUDENT SC FICXM REI ATIONS -Perry 
Anderson 

Slacy Soileau reminded Ihe senators about 
their absences. She also asked for a motion lo 
approve Perry Anderson as the SU'GB 
representalise. 

Harlan Harvey announced that today al 
5:00 the nominations closed for Mr. and Miss 
NSU. The elections are November 3. 

Larry Hall announced a meeting frith Ihe 
Budgel C ommittee Chairman. They will set a 
deadline tor the budgets. Next week he will 
have the expenditures of Slate I air Week. 
COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Richard Trcadway. AIX)S. announced lhat 
they won the banner contest for the Keg of 
beer. 



your adviser, discuss your schedule, classes, 
You and your adviser should complete your trail 
Make sure your adviser signs your trial schedule 



ADVANCED REGISTRATION PROCEDURE 
Step 1 

November 11- 
November 19 

Go to your department head and get your packet and tria 
schedule card. 
Step 2 

November 11- 
November 19 

Set up an appointment with your adviser. 
Step 3 

November 11- 
November 19 
Meet with 
problems, etc. 
schedule card, 
ard. 
Step 4 

November 22- 
November 24 

You should report to the Student Union Ballroom according 
to the schedule following. Bring with you: (A) registration 
packet, (B) trial schedule card with adviser's signature and (c) 
pencils and pens. 
Step 5 

Upon entering the Ballroom, the following sequence should be 
followed: (A) Pick up class cards, fill in your name and SSN on 
each card (INK ONLY), (B) complete in ink the front and back 
of the registrar's card.(C) go by your department head's table 
and have your packet checked and signed. (D) go to your 
Dean's table and have your packet checked and signed, (E) go to 
the Registrar's table. You should have your copy of the trial 
schedule card and packet. Your packet will be checked and left 
at this station. Your student's part of the trial schedule card will 
be stamped "ADVANCED REGISTRATION". This is your 
receipt that you have completed this phase of advanced 
registration. KEEP THIS RECEIPT IN A SECURE PLACE. 
You will need it later when you pay your fees. 
Step 6 
9:00 A.M. 
January 10- 
January 1 1 

Come to the Student Union Ballroom. Pick up your Ice sheet 
and student data sheet. Examine the student data sheet closely. If 
ou see any errors, make changes on this sheet. Follow the lines 
through each station and pay your fees. Be sure to leave the 
student data sheet at the last station. You are now officially 
registered for the Spring Semester. 
Noon 

January 12 
NOTE: 

If you cannot be here on January 10 or January 1 1 go lo the 
information table at Prather Coliseum, and pick up your fee 
sheet and student data sheet and proceed through the assessment 
and paying line at the coliseum. The information table is located 
forward of the front door leading into the arena. 
First Day 
to Drop/Add 
January 17 

CHANGES IN YOUR SCHEDULE: 
Follow these steps: 

1. Fill out a drop/add card and have your adviser sign it. 
,2. If you wish only to drop a course, the regular drop 
irocedure is followed. (First day January 17) 

3. If you wish to add courses, present your stamped schedule 
or cancelled fee sheet at the information table. Obtain class 
card(s) for course(s) to be added. All courses to be added must 
be listedon the Hrnn/add card. Complete the processing on the 
first day .oadd. (Monday, January 17) 

REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 



November 22 
12:00 Noon M 
12:30N 
l:00O 
1:30 P-Q 
2:00 R 
2:30 S 
3:00T 
3:30 U-V 
4:00 W 



November 23 
12:00 Noon X-Y-Z 
12:30 
1:00 B 
1:30 C 
2:00 D 
2:30 E-F 
3:00 G 
3:30 H-l 
4:00J-K-L 

4:30 - 5:30 Late Advanced Registrant; 



Jack Welch. SUGB. said lhal all siudenis 
must gel a ticket free with their I.D. to gel into 
Ihe Ronnie Milsap concert. No I.D.'s will he 
checked al the door You must have a ticket. 
NEW BUSINF.VS 

Don Stacy mosed lo approve Perry An 
derson as ihe new SUGB representalise Dean 
Sapoli seconded. Motion passed. 
ANNOUNC EMEN IS 

Iberville Dining hall has changed its hours to 
siav men until 2:110 p.m. on December I I here 



will oca Demon I oniiccnon. 

Traffic and Safety ( ummillcc Meeting at 
1:00 Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. NSU Flections on NoscimScr 

J. 

I'crry Anderson Ihanked Mrs. Ilosarge lor 
Ihe cookies she sent 10 the meeting. 

Richard I rvadway moved lo adjourn. Scott 
Repp seconded. Molina passed 

Rcspccllully Submitted. 
Allison Arthur. Secretary 



Current Sauce, Page 6, November 2, ,'982 



■ The Current Sauce is now 
2 taking applications for the 

• position of advertising 

• manager for the Spring (83) 
» semester. If you are in- 

■ terested, contact the Current 

■ Sauce office between 9-10 on 

■ MWF, 11-12 T-Th and bet- 
2 ween 1-2 on T-F. A financial 



Nominees For. 







Lytt Allen 




Larry Hall 




Robert Jackson 



T 

Mexi 




FOR A FULL COLOR 13" X 26" POSTER OF MEXICO'S 
BEST SHOT— SEND $3.00 (includes postage and handling) TO SPAR, INC. 
P.O. BOX 52831 , NEW ORLEANS, LA. 70152. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. 

CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS ONLY • QUANTITIES LIMITED. 



\ 



Floyd James 



80 PROOF IMPORTED AND BOTTLED 8Y SAZERAC CO.. INC . N O . LA. 



November 2, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 7 



...Mr. MissNSU- 







Don Stacy 



Mike Vienne 



Beverly Armstrong Alison Breazeale 



Cindy Duke 





Alicia Haynes 



Kristi Heyd 



Vera LaCour 




Marti Williamson 



Dean Napoli 



Joe Stamey 



BEOG CHECKS 

ARE READY IN THE CASHIER'S OF- 
FICE, SECOND FLOOR ROY HALL. 
THEY'VE BEEN THERE FOR A WHILE, 
COME BY AND PICK YOURS UP. 



The Currenl Sauce is now 
accepting stories, pictures, and 
ideas for the Lampoon edition 
of the Sauce, which will be 
printed sometime near the end 
of March or early April. 
Stories need to be typed and 
may be left unsigned. 
However, stories must be done 
in semi-good taste andd can 
not be construed as libelous. 
If you sign your name kj the 
story, please specify whetrrer 
or not you would like your 
name on the story in the 
paper. 



Phi Mu 
Rock-a-Thon 

The Phi Mu's will be rocking on 
Wednesday, November 3, from 12 
noon to 6 p.m. in the Student Union 
Lobby. Come by and sponsor a Phi 
Mu. All proceeds go the the Cane 
River Children's Home. Please help 
us help them. 



High End 

CD PIONEER 



Sale 



* 



Reg M39 90 

$ 373 91 



KE 5100 An in dash digital cassette deck unit) quart/ electronic AM/FM stereo tuflei Super 
lunet II lb station (10 FM/5 AM) etecUomc pre set 'leather touch"' push put ton tuning Ac 
cuarie quari/ Pit lumnq Automatic seek/scan tuning Built m duck with : clock button Digital 
time/frequency display with 4 diqrt qreen 1 \ Double diffusion MOS Ft T hunt end Bui" in PNS 
noise suppression f-M auto/mono and local/scan switch Parallel radei control tape play 
indicator Lockiflg last torward and rtiwind Automatic teplay alter rewind Autuniatit eject 
Loudness switch 




TS 697 Hirjii power 6"*9" two way speaker. Unnhstnictcd bndqeless eofistriiclujri and a 
handsome mesh grille lo» better sound dispersion ? 5/8 tweeter 20 »/ ternle magnet 
Maximum input 60 watts 

1 5 % OFF 

* All Pioneer Speakers 

* All Pioneer Decks 
Priced '199.95 and up... 

Layaways and installation available. 

UNIVERSITY SOUNDS 

352-8077 



i 



Current Sauce, Page 8, November 2, 1982 



Theater/Speech Events Continuin S Education 'Plugging Along 



Beatrice Dawson 

The Department of Theatre 
and Speech reports on two of 
its major events for the 
semester: a coke can contest 
for the upcoming play "El 
Grande de Coca-Cola" and 
the success of the first play 
"Home". 

A musical revue by Ron 
Ho use and Dig White, "El 
Grande de Coca-Cola" will be 
directed by Nan L Stephenson, 
who is the director of the 
theatre, and will run Nov. 15- 
19. The play will consist of a 
flexible cast and a scene design 
made of coke cans. 

As a result of the play, the 
department is sponsoring a 
coke can contest. Therefore, 
each and any organization on 
campus will have the op- 
portunity to compete with 
each other in collecting cans. 

The rules for the contest are 
as follows: 

1 . There must be at least 50 
cans to enter the contest. 
However, any amount 
donated will be accepted. 

2. All coke cans must be 
empty. 

3. Cans may be brought to 
room 410 of Keyset Hall, in 
the mornings, or to room 402- 
A, in the afternoons. The 
deadline for turning in all cans 
is Nov. 5. 

"Prizes will be given by the 
Bottling Co. of Natchitoches, 
who has been real helpful," 
stated Miss Stephenson. 
"These prizes will be 



presented Nov. ti in Keyser 
Auditorium before the movie 
"Arthur" begins," she added. 
Each of the five groups will 
receive special recognition 
during a certain night of the 
play. 

The production will be held 
in the Student Union Ballroom 
with "alcoholic beverages" 
served, the Director inserted. 

The department also 
highlighted the semester with 
its production of "Home" by 
Samm-Art Williams. 

Directed by Dr. Robert 
Black, "Home" entered the 
la. College Theatre Festival at 
La. Tech. "Overall, I felt it 
was a success," commented 
Dr. Black. "The audience 
loved it, I loved it, and I know 
the cast enjoyed doing it 
because they gained a lot from 
it," he exclaimed. 

In addition to the play, 
Susan Haga, a student 
playwright, got first place for 
"Rockerfeller Square" - a 
one-act play; Vince Williams, 
who portrayed Cephas in 
"Home", received the Irene 
Ryan award - both will go on 
to Fort Worth and compete in 
other events; and Dr. Black, 
along with five other directors, 
received a citation. 
"Although our play wasn't 
nominated, we did come back 
with a few awards and are 
quite pleased with the outcome 
of the play," concluded Dr. 
Black. 



Department of Theater and 
Speech Receives Awards 



Vince Williams of Nat- 
chiticohes was nominated for 
i he Irene Ryan Acting 
Scholarship, and Dr. Robert 
Black received the Amoco 
Award for outstanding play 
directing to highlight Nor- 
thwestern's participation last 
week at the Louisiana college 
Theatre Festival in Ruston. 

A senior theatre-speech 
major, Williams was ne of 14 
collegiate actors and actresses 
from Louisiana who received 
nominations for the $750 
scholarship to be given to a 
student at the Region VI 
Festival Jan. 16-23 in Ft. 
Worth, Tex. 

The 12 regional scholarship 
winners will be in Washington, 
D.C., in the spring to par- 
ticipate in "Evening of 
Scenes," which will highlight 
the National College Theatre 
Festival. Two student per- 
formers are awarded $2,500 
scholarships at the National 
Festival. 

Williams was nominated for 
his portrayal of Cephus, the 
lead role in "Home," a play 
by Samm-Art Williams which 
deals joyfully with the coming 
of age of a young black man 
from rural South Carolina. 



The play, wntch was inmJ"s 
entry in the Louisiana College 
Theatre Festival, was directed 
by Black, professor and head 
of the Theatre-Speech 
Department at Northwestern. 
Black was one of five college 
and university directors who 
received the Amoco Award for 
outstanding direction of a 
Play- 
Also at the state festival in 
Ruston, Northwestern junior 
English major Susan Haga of 
Many had her one-act play, 
"Rockefeller Square," 
selected for the regional 
competition in Ft. Worth. 

In addition to Black, NSU 
faculty members Michael 
Atkins, Ray Schexnider and 
Nan Stephenson also attended 
the five-day festival hosted by 
Louisiana Tech University. 

Schexnider was Nor- 
thwestern's official 
representative at the Louisiana 
Division of the Arts meeting 
conducted during the state 
festival. "The general thrust 
of the meeting was that »j;e 
urged the formation of a 
professional theatre repertory 
company in Louisiana," said 
Schexnider. 



The Caldwell Hall fire left 
many offices without a home, 
but the office of Continuing 
Education found a new 
nesting place in East Caspar! 
and is plugging right along, 
despite their enormous loss. 

Mike McCallister of 
Continuing Ed. didn't even 
know about the fire until early 
Tuesday morning when 
Kathryn Beasley, project 
coordinator, called and told 
him. 

According to McCallister, 
they had planned on moving 
the Office of Continuing Ed. 
into Caspari, however, being 



ahead of schedule was not in 
the plans. Nevertheless, 
Tuesday afternoon everyone 
started the big clean up project 
before being able to move in. 

All the departments that 
were not hurt in the fire of- 
fered supplies, desks, and 
typewriters in order to help 
out with starting over. "They 
really pitched in a really nice 
way," McCallister said. 
"Decisions were made 
quickly. Dean Galloway did 
an excellent job in heading it." 

All of McCallister's per- 
sonal stuff was lost in the fire, 
as was all the paperwork for 



the lignite research, grants for 
training surface miners, ad the 
PIPS program. 

The Office of Continuing 
Ed affects not only the 
university, but also, the 
community with all the 
programs it has to offer at a 
temporary slowdown. "There 
is one advantage, though," 
laughed McCallister. 

"Everyone's office has a 
lavatory. And plus, with my 
new windows being on he east 
and south side, I'm going to 
have the prettiest plants on 
campus." 



Family Day At NSU November 6 



Family Day will be observed" 
at Northwestern Saturday in 
conjunction with the NSU- 
Nicholls State University in a 
special halftime ceremonvGov 
Dave Treen will be the 
guest of NSU'president Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze in the 
stadium's President's Box. 

Coordinated by NSU dean' 
of students Dr. Fred C. 
Bosarge, Family Day is 
celebrated each year to honor 
and recognize parents and 
other family members of 
Northwestern students for 
their important roles in the 
success of the university. 

"Northwestern students 
have taken great pride in their 
university home through the 
years and have enjoyed 
sharing their campus lives with 
their families," said Orze. 

Bosarge said, "The purpose 
of Family Day is to attract 
parents and immediate family 
members of enrolled un- 
dergraduate students to the 
campus for a period of 
positive recognition and 
courtesies provided by the 
university. Our primary goal 
is to foster a sense of one big 
family. From this event, we 
hope to gain the ongoing 
support of parents and 
families as a special con- 
stituency served by Nor- 
thwestern." 

Bosarge anticipates that 
more than 1,000 individuals 
will participate in this year's 
Family Day observance, which 
begins with an open house 
program from 1 p.m. to 4 
p.m. in campus residence 
halls, fraternity and sorority 
houses and at the Outdoor 
Recration Complex. 

A reception honoring 
families of NSU's un- 
dergraduate students is 
scheduled from 4 p.m. to 5:30 
p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom. Visitors passes for 
members of students' families 
to attend Saturday night's 
game as guests of the 
university may be obtained 
during the reception. 

Bosarge said families of 
students may sit in the student 



section of the stadium, in 
general admission seats or in 
Sections B, J, or K on the 
reserved side. 

During the reception, the 
university's academic 
departments will have special 
exhibits on display. In- 



formation will also be 
available on student life and 
financial aid. 

Visiting family members 
may have dinner with students 
from 5 p.m. to-6:30 p.m. in 
Iberville Dining Hall or the 
Student Union Cafeteria. 



Placement Office 
Government Career Day 
November 4 

The University will host Governm,ent Day on 
November 4, 1982. Several agencies will be in- 
terviewing senior and graduate students graduating in 
December, May or July, for employment with the 
Government. 

The interviews will take place in the Student Union 
Building, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. with an hour 
break for lunch. Each interview session is 60 
minutes and begins on the hour. Each session will be 
a group interview and very informative. 

You do not need a file with the Placement Office to 
attend these interviews, HOWEVER YOU MAY COME 
BY THE OFFICE, TO SIGN UP FOR AN APPOINTMENT. 

Majors 



Agency 

Social Security Administration 
U.S. Forest Service, Kisatchie NF 
Dept. of Army: Civilan 
Personnel Office 

USDA, Soil Conservation Service 



All Majors 
Forestry 

All Majors 
Agri Business, Soil, 
Science, Agronomy 

Statistical Reporting Service, 
USDA All Agriculatural Majors 

Houston Police All Majors 

Federal Aviation Administration All Majors 

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Accounting 

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Barksdale Air Force Base: 
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All Majors 
IET, Electronics 
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All Majors 




Sports 



Roger's Voice 

By Roger Reynolds 



Winning Season Just 
Around The Comer 



November 2, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 9 



As the Demons began to 
close out their 1982 football 
campaign, it is time now sit 
down and take the first look at 
the Demon football season. 
Northwestern is 5-3, up to this 
point in the season with three 
tough games left on the 
schedule. Two of the Demons 
last three games will by played 
in the friendly confines of 
Turpin Stadium. 

Northwestern after a week 
of rest puts its 5-3 record on 
the line against the Nicholls 
State University Colonels. A 
victory will give the Demons a 
winning season, the first in 
two years and only three in the 
last seven years. To acheive 
this milestone the Demons 
only have to win one of the 
last three games of the season. 



The only other winning 
seasons for the Demons under 
the A. L. Williams reign have 
been a 6-5 record and a 8-3 
record, which was then 
followed up by a poor 4-6 year 
with just about every starter 
returning returning but 12 
seniors. I know that some of 
these loses were of key people, 
but on the defensive side of 
things the majority was 
returnees, one would expected 
better than a 4-6 mark. 

The Demons now only need 
to win only one of the last 
three games to insure a 
winning season, so lets all 
show a little school spirit and 
get out and support the 
Demons and help push them 
on to victory and a there third 
winning season in seven years. 



Yugoslavian Team To Play 
I n Exhibition Game 



The Natchitoches Lions 
Club Second Annual Benefit 
basketball game will be held 
November 18 in NSU's 
Prat her Coliseum when the 
Demons host Yugoslavia in an 
exhibition contest. The game 
will start at 7:30 p.m. 

The contest is sponsored by 
'he Natchitoches Lions Club, 
with the proceeds going to the 
Lions Crippled Children's and 
lght Conservation programs, 
a| ong with the NSU basketball 
Program. 

Tickets for the exhibition 
«>ntest are $4 for adults and 
M 'or students and can be 
Purchased from Lion Club 
^embers and will be on sale at 
"ie door the night of the game. 

Along with the basketball 
same, wich will be the first 

m\ K ap P earance for the 

82-83 Demon squad, several 
other activities are being 
Panned by the Lions Club, 
'here will be several drawings 
j° r prizes, halftime will 
ea ture tug of war contests 
.etween NSU fraternities and 
Monties and also at halftime 
nere will be several high 
cl jool dance lines performing. 

Last year the Lions club 
e ;°" s °red the pre-seasn 
xnibition game in which the 
. nions defeated a touring 

icore'" 1 ' " 1 Mexico by a 105 " 79 



The Yugoslavia team will 
play eight games on its 10-day 
trip to the United States. The 
trip will open November 13 at 
Texas-Arlington and the 
squad will also play at Hardin- 
Simmons and at Centenary 
before making Northwestern 
the fourth stop on the trip. 

"From what information 
we have Yugoslavia is a big, 
• strong, physical team that has 
a lot of veteran players," said 
Demon Coach Wayne Yates. 
"It will be a good contest for 
us. They are seasoned in 
international competition and 
have been playing together for 
a number of years." 

"We are looking forward to 
the first competition of the 
season and are very ap- 
preciative of the support of the 
Lions Club," added Yates. 
"They give us a big boost each 
year with the exhibition game. 

We all felt last season was a 
big success and I know we will 
be playing a much better team 
this year than we did a year 
ago." 

The Demons will open the 
regular season at home on 
December 1 when they host 
Arkansas-Little Rock, the 
defending conference 
champion and the pre-season 
favorite for the 1982-83 title. 



Lady Demons Showing Improvement 



Northwestern Lady "Demon 
basketball Coach Pat Pierson 
says her squad is showing 
steady improvement at the 
Lady Demons prepare for the 
season opener at home on 
November 27 against McNeese 
State University. 

The Lady Demons return 
four starters from the team 
that posted an 18-7 record last 
season and Pierson says those 
returning players and some 
talented newcomers give her 
more depth than she has had 
before. 

"Our four returning 
veterans have to show the new 
players some leadership," says 
Pierson. "And so far they 
have. We have a number of 
freshman who will be thrown 
into the fire right away, and so 
far they seem to be accepting 
the challenge of that." 

The four returning starters 
include center Tracy Taylor, 
forwards Stephanie 
Washington and Kim Paulk 
and guard Lisa Carter. Guard 
Johnnie Kay Heard is the 
other returning letter-winner. 

The Lady Demon inside 
game has been slowed 
somewhat in early workouts 
because of the absence of 
Taylor, who is just starting 
practicing again this week 
after having her tonsils 
removed. 

Improved shooting and 
added quickness are what 
Pierson says should be the 
strong points this season, 



while there is concern for a 
lack of depth behind Taylor at 
center. "Overall our shooting 
has been much better tha it 
was last season," said Pierson. 
"And all of our new players 
have so much quickness." 

At 6-3 Taylor is the only 
returning player over six-feet 
tall while freshman Val 
Williams is an even six feet. 
"We aren't that big inside but 
our veterans like Stephenie, 
Kim and Lisa are all good 
rebounders," noted Pierson. 
"And Val goes to the of- 
fensive board real well and has 
improved everyday." 

"We know that until Val 
gets some experience we are 
thin behind Tracy," admitted 
Pierson. "And Tracy is aware 
of that. She is concentrating 
on cutting down on her fouls 
because she knows she will 
have to be in there most of the 
time, at least early in the 
season." 

Even with the veterans 
returning, Pierson has been 
impressed with her freshmen. 
"We just have never had this 
kind of depth," added 
Pierson. "These freshmen are 
very talented and Johnnie Kay 
Heard has improved 
tremendously from last 
season. She also can really 
help us." 

While Pierson isn't sure of a 
starting line-up, she also says 
it really isn't a concern. "We 
have at least nine players who 
are going to play alot so it 



doesn't matter who tne 
starters are," pointed out 
Pierson. 

"We are going to take 
advantage of our quickness 
and depth. We will use full 
court pressure and run the ball 
on the break at every chance 
we have," said Pierson. 
"With that style we plan to use 
alot of players each game and 
hopefully keep them fresh." 

With the fast break style 
and using a number of 
freshmen, Pierson and 
assistant Coach James Smith 
say they will expect some 
mistakes. "You just try to 
keep the mistakes at a 
minimum," noted Pierson. 
"We know we will make some 
mistakes in this style of play. 
Plus the college game is 
different to our freshmen and 
it will take them sme time to 
adapt. Fortunately we feel 
they have the talent to make 
that adjustment quickly and 
they seem to pick up different 
things each day." 

The Lady Demons will have 
a tough early schedule. After 
hosting McNeese State in the 
opener, the Lady Demons will 
play at Northeast Louisiana 
and then take part in the Lady 
Techster Dian classic at 
Louisiana Tech. 

In the first round of that 
eight-team tournament the 
Lady Demons will face 
Cheyney State, the team that 
placed second in the nation 
behind Louisiana Tech last 
season. 



I ft" 



»■«< ! « . ,.«« ■■■« !■ m..p* . . .f. . fl. ---ft- ( HT M 



Vote Wednesday 



YOURBSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you re a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you're an officer. You start as a full -fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



i 



C ut rent Sauce, Page 10. November 2. 1982 



Yates Impressed With Pre-season Practice 



Northwestern basketball 
Coach Wayne Yates says he's 
noi ready lo start ihe season 
yet, bin i lull he has been 
impressed with (he way his 
Demon squad has looked in 
I lie first week of practice. 

Vales has ihree siariers 
returning from ihe squad thai 
posted a 19-9 overall mark lasi 
season while placing second in 
ihe I rans America Conference 
regular: season laee. Yates 
I eels that gives him a solid 
foundation foi ihis season. 

"( hit I 'our senioi s are doing 
a 1 1 emendous job of providing 
us will] leadership," said 
Vaies following the I'irM week 
i>l practice. "< hir enthusiasm 
and lean) spiiii is i he best it's 
been. There seems in be a 
good learn feeling." 

I hose lour seniors reluming 
foi iheii final vein include 
( ah in Madloek, Johnnv 
Martin. Harry l-rancis and 
Kenny Male. All were siariers 
lasi season except I rancis, 
« ho prox ed \ ei \ \ aluablc as a 
sixih man w ho could pla\ both 
foi wai d and guard. 

Vales says one of ihe main 
sitcngilis of his squad ihis 
season will be the v crsil ilil v. 
"Oiii inside people are ven 
similar and we have social 
players ihai can pla\ am of 
ihe Ihree inside positions," 



added Yates. "This should 
allow us more freedom in 
moving people in and out of 
ihe line-up." 

"W e should be able 10 press 
and change our defenses much 
mroc ihis season and be more 
effective ihis year," continued 
Yates, who has a 30-26 mark 
after two years at Nor- 
ihwesiern. "When you play 
ihis style you have lo have 
depth. Willi ihe depth we 
have ihis season more players 
will gel playing lime without 
hurling ihe ballcluh." 

After ihe fits! week of 
workouts Ihe poini guard 
position is being shared by 
junior I'red Walker and 
freshman Brian JoHvette. 
Walker was reshirted last 
season. "Yon can tell that 
lied has been here lor a year 
in thai he knows whal we are 
looking lor," said Yaies. 

Hale returns at ihe wing 
guard and Francis and 
freshman DcShon Jenkins are 
also playing there. I- rancis 
will play boih i he wing guard 
and small forward posiiions 
Hale was ihe second leading 
scorer on i he team a year ago. 

Up from Vales has several 
players who will see aloi of 
action. I hey include reluming 
starters Manin and Madloek, 
returning leiiermen Anthony 
Trench and Jerr\ Harris and 



lour newcomers, juniors Jeff 
Ringham, A.J. Culbreaih and 
Robin Grays and freshman 
Donald Mays. 

Although ihree siariers do 
return* Yates says his squad 
will definitely miss the outside 
shooting of Wayne Waggoner 
and the inside play of Earnest 
Reliford, the two seniors who 
were starters lasi season. 

"I'm not sure our starting 
five will be as good as last 
year," admitted Yates, "But o 
t he oilier had, our top ten 
players will be deeper. W e will 
have more depth and we will 
have good flexibility with ihe 
people we have playing in- 
side." 

I he Demons will open the 
season with an exhibition 
contest on November 18 
against a louring squad from 
Yugoslavia and Ihe open ihe 
regular season ai home 
December I against defending 
league champion Arkansas- 
Little Rock. 

"We have lo work hard ihis 
month go get ready because we 
can'i afford a slow start," 
concluded Yates. "Our first 
few games are lough ones and 
out first two league games are 
against Little Rock and 
Houston Baptist, probably the 
two best learns in the league. 
We will certainly have in be 
reach that first nisiht." 



he 



Demon Playground 

ag looiball rcgulai as t ;isi Rapides challenged the touchdown passes and Doug 



season came to an end lasi 
week as reams froni the I'oiii 
divisions plaved iheii final 
games, excluding ihe post 
season games being held ihis 
w cek . 

On Mondav ihe \ IPs look 
a \ { >-(i viciorv awav from 
I'nkappa 5Uf*N number one 
icani. Susan I'linee led ihe 
wav lor the N il's with iwo 
touchdowns and an extra 
point. C hie Jeans came awav 
•villi a narrow win over Sigma 
Kappa by a score of 13-12. 
lanmn ("urn and I'ennv 
Powell both scored six points, 
w Inlc Jennv Johnson a ltd C una 
Koiissaux did all ihe scoiing 
loi Sigma Kappa with a 
louchdow n apiece. 

I Kl fell io I heta Chi (9-14 
as I red I ci aca scored 1 2 
poinis. James McC lain added 
six more for ihe victors. 
Start) duilloiv led I Kl with 
two i oiichdou ns in the 
coniesi. In ihe iiHlependeni 
league. YANd One crushed 
Zoom 26-6. Joe Cunningham 
paced ihe YANlisiers with 12 
points, while Donnv Harrison 
and C hi is Moran scored seven 
and six points respect ivety. 
Rand Meiover scored Zoom's 
onlv louchilow n of ihe da> . 

In ihe final game of ihe dav . 
ii was the •Manic of Rapides' 



Rapides Knighls. In ihe end. 
u was i-'Raps whii came awav 
ihe eonquerers with a 13-6 
triumph. 

( )n I uesdav. it was again 
Susan Prince leading I he wav 
loi ihe \ IPs vviih 13 poinis, as 
they lolled lo a 26-7 win over 
Ihe Iri-Sigs. 

Dav id N-a-'rdwri almost 
single-handeilh defeated Sin 



an. as he scored 



poinis m 



I heia ( hi's 34- 19 romp. 
Nardhii i m ncd in an \l \ P- 
ivpe perl oi maiice as he ac- 
counted - for fdiir louch- 
dow nsaud one extra poini in 
i he victory. YANCi One 
finished ihe regular season 
wiih a sterling 5-0 iccoid. 
ihanks ui a 25-6 trouncing ol 
Kingpins. David Sailors. Joe 

unninghain. Dean Napoli. 
mil I >onn> 1 Ian ison all scored 
one I .1). apiece in the victor) 
for , i AMI. who allowed onlv 
1 2 points in l iv e games. 

I nKappa sih number one 
sliuioui Sigma Kappa on 
Wednesday io take a 28-0 
viciorv. C indy Wigl\ scored 
14 poinis foi I.K.. while 
Shen i Broocks contribuied 12. 

Kappa Sig's second team 
finished their regular season 
wiih a 20-6 rouiing of Kappa 
Alpha. Russell Bienvenu 
paced ihe Sig Dogs wiih iwo 



W illiamson added a 1.1). and 
an extra poini io help in ihe 
win. KA finally got on the 
board wiih jusi over a minute 
and a half lel'i in the game 
when main of the Sig's 
starters had left the game. 

I he Kingpins assured 
fhemsekes of a playoff berth 
wiih a 19-12 victory over 10 
Blind Hoys. Ihe Sieelers 
captured a first place finish in 
ihe Orange division with a 5-0 
record as ihcv defeated the 
Jocks IS- 1 4. who finished 4-1 
in ihe same div ision for second 
place. Waller Pmkston, 
Dav ill Monet re. and 1 amai 
Johnson all contribuied six 
points for the Sieelers. Jerrv 
Nowell scored iwo louch- 
ilow ns for ihe Jocks. 

On Thursday Kappa Sig's 
first team picked up where 
their second team left off as 
they dest roved KA 41-6. The 
score was 13-0 at the end of 
the first half, before the Dogs 
got it together. Mike Brown 
and Randy IJonneti.e each 
scored iwo times, while David 
Webb and Rog "ain't we 
sonieihin" Reynolds added 
eight and six points respoc- 
liv eh . 

In the last game of ihe dav. 
Sigma Kappa used a strong 
team effort to beat Phi Mu 27- 




NEWS FROM THE 
PLACEMENT OFFICE 



With graduation just around the corner you may want to take 
advantage of these resources available in the Placement Office 
located in the Student Union, Room 305. 

1 . Up to date job vacancy newsletters from placement offices: 
Mississippi State 

Tennessee 
Virginia 
Syracuse 
Toledo 
Iowa State 
Southern Illinois 
Western Kentucky 
Kearney State 
Ball State 
Central Michigan 
Northwestern 

2. Educational Directories of High School in the following states: 

Louisiana 
Texas 
Arkansas 
Mississippi 

3. Overseas teaching opportunities 

4. Telephone directories from mapr cities in Louisiana ands 

Texas. 

5. Caieer Opportunity UPDATE that lists thousands of current 
jobs available with hundreds of employers. 

6. Classified ads from all major newspapers in the state oU 
Louisiana. 



Placement Office 
Job Interviews for 
Remainder of Fall Semester 



Interviewing 
graduating in 
November 3 

November 4 
November 5 
November 8 



seniors and graduate 
December. May or July. 
Peat Marwick. Mitchell & Co 
Accounting 

Government Career Day 
U.S. Air Force 
Prudential Insurance 



students 



November 9 Fust National Bank 



All Majors 
A Majors 
Business. Any 
Major 

Accounting. 
Finance 

November 10 L'Oreal Business 
November 10 U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. Business 
November 17 Chevrolet Central Office 4 year 

Computer Majors 
November 1 8 Creighton University Graudate School 
Novembei 18 Dept. of Revenue & Taxation Ac 

cou ruing. Business 
November 18 Caddo Parish School Board Education 
November 1 8 Investors Diversified Services 

Business. Any Major 
November 30 Con Agra Business. Accounting. 

Agricultural Degtees 
Decembei 2 South Central Bell Business 

Administration 
Math. Physics. Marketing 
Decembei 3 U.S. Air Force All Majors 

The Placement Office 
Student Union. Room 305 
357 5621 

Please call or come by and select a time to interview 
if you are interested in any of the compames. Simply 
stated, we enjoy helping you. Come see us 1 



T 



November 2, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 1 1 



Porker Picker Panel ★ 



This 

Week's 

Games 



NSU 
vs. 

Nicholls St. 



Alabama 

vs. 
LSU 



Ole Miss 

vs. 
Tulane 



Florida 

vs. 
Georgia 



Illinois 

vs. 
Michigan 



Clemson 

vs. 

NorthCarolina 



Pittsburgh 

vs. 

Notre Dame 



Texas-El Paso 

vs. 

New Mexico 



Washington 
vs. 
UCLA 



Bates 
vs. 
Bowdoin 



Season 
Record 




Roger 

Reynolds 



NSU 
35-24 



Alabama 
35-24 



Ole Miss 
17-7 



Georgia 
28-21 



Michigan 
24-17 



North 
Carolina 
28-14 



Pittsburgh 
21-17 



New Mexico 
28-7 



Washington 
28-17 



Bates 
14-10 



46-24 
.657 




John 

Cunningham 



NSU 
28-17 



Alabama 
27-21 



Ole Miss 
21-10 



Georgia 
34-20 



Michigan 
24-17 



Clemson 
21-14 



Pittsburgh 
24-21 



New Mexico 
35-10 



Washington 
28-14 



Bates 
31-21 



43-27 
.614 




Alison 

Breazeale 



NSU 
21-12 



LSU 
35-28 



Tulane 
24-10 



Georgia 
28-20 



Michigan 
27-10 



Clemson 
27-21 



Pittsburgh 
14-7 



New Mexico 
21-7 



UCLA 
35-27 



Bates 
40-10 




Joe 
Cunningham 



NSU 
42-41 



Alabama 
35-14 



Ole Miss 
21-14 



Georgia 
35-21 



Michigan 
34-10 



Clemson 
21-10 



Notre Dame 
13-10 



New Mexico 
45-0 



Washington 
35-24 



Bates 
35-3 



43-27 
.614 



46-24 
.657 




Barbi 
Hall 



NSU 
27-20 



LSU 
13-7 



Tulane 
10-7 



Georgia 
10-7 



Michigan 
21-17 



Clemson 
21-20 




Donna Jo 
Kellv 



NSU 
31-27 



Alabama 
20-17 



Ole Miss 
7-0 



Georgia 
28-27 



Michigan 
24-21 




Jim 

Oliver 



NSU 
31-14 



Alabama 
35-17 



Ole Miss 
14-13 



Georgia 
27-13 



Michigan 
24-20 



North Carolina 
21-14 



Notre Dame 
32-28 



New Mexico 
21-20 



UCLA 
14-10 



Bowdoin 
7-0 



45-25 
.642 



Pittsburgh 
28-17 



New Mexico 
28-10 



UCLA 
24-17 



Bowdin 
10-9 



45-25 
.642 



North 
Carolina 
17-14 



Pittsburgh 
21-3 



New Mexico 
21-10 



UCLA 
30-21 



Bowdoin 
3-0 



40-30 
.571 



More Demon Playground 



6. Janice Duggan led all 
scorers with two touchdowns. 
Jenny Johnson and Gina 
Roussaux added seven points 
apiece to round out the scoring 
for Sigma Kappa. Lynn 
Claryscored Phi Mu's only 
touchdown. 

In the intramural tennis 
tournament held last week at 
the rec. complex, YANG took 
top honors in both men's 
events. Brothers Parker and 
Tony Thompson gave YANG 
the men's doubles cham- 
pionship as they defeated Joe 
Bienvenu and Paul Pickering, 
also of YANG in the final 
round. In the men's singles 
event Parker Thompson put 
YANG on top againwith a 
final-round victory over 
Franklin Silva of Kingpins. 

Angela Lasyone and Lynn 
Clary teamed up to give Phi 
Mu a first place finish in the 
women's doubles competition. 
Sherri Broocks and Renee 



Richard of UnKappa 5th took 
second. Lasyone also finished 
first in the singles division, as 
she defeated U.K. 5th's 
Annette Manuel. 

The flag-football playoffs 
begin todayat 4:00 at the 
intramural fields, with the first 
round of competition. On 
Wednesday the second round 
of playoffs will be held, with 
the finals being played on 
Thursday. The men's In- 
dependent champion will take 
on the men's Greek champion 
in a Super Bowl, to be held 
next week at Turpin Stadium. 
The women's first place 
finisher will take on the 
runnerup in a Super Bowl that 
will also be played on the turf 
next week. 

Here are the final standings 
of the flag-football divisions. 
MEN'S GREEK 

1 . Kappa Sig no. 1 

2. Kappa Alpha 

3. Theta Chi 



4. Kappa Sig no. 2 
MEN'S ORANGE 

1 . Steelers 

2. Jocks 

3. Conine 

4. YANG no. 2 



MEN'S PURPLE 

1. YANG no. 1 

2. Zoom 

3. Kingpins 

4. 10 Blind Boys 



Reynolds A nd Sledge 
Win Week's Picks 

Sports Editor Roger 
Reynolds continued to impress 
the rest of the Porker Picker 
Panel with his unbelievably 
dumb, but lucky, predictions 
abilities, and guest panelist 
Scott Sledge picked the Emory 
and Henry upset over 
Hampden and Sidney, to 
garner top honors for the 
week. 

Reynolds was the only 
panelist to successfully pick 
the Arizona St. win over USC, 
and thereby moved into a first 
place tie with Joe "Graceful" 
Cunningham (6-4), who had a 
poor week and a hapless 
weekend. 

Alison "I'm on a roll" 
Breazeale (6-4) and John 
"Coolhead" Cunningham, 
(also 6-4), are tied for fourth 
place, only three games behind 
the front runners. Also going 
6-4 for the week was Melanie 
"1 sould have listened to Scott 
instead of Joe" Campbell who 
moved that guest selector's 
spot a meager one game out of 
first. 

"Dynamite" Dudley Hall, 
fell to 5-5 for the week, despite 
the fact that he picked three 
ties. 

Reynolds and Joe Cun- 
ningham have waged a battle 
for the lop spot for the entire 
year, but John Cunningham, 
in a interview with KNWD 
said, "I am just wailing for 
the right time to make my 
move to the top." 

This week's guest selector's 
include Donna Jo "From 
Kokomo" Kelly, and Barbi 
"Doll" Hall. Also picking 
this week is Diamond Jim 
"Please Coach, let me play 
this year" Oliver. Frequently 
referred to as "O", Diamond 
Jim lists as his greatest 
memory, the warm spring day 
last April when he fouled off 
three consectutive pitches in a 
meaningless intra-squad 
scrimmage. This year "O" 
hopes to have a batting 
average. 



SGA 

Free Legal Aid 

SGA Attorney 
Is On Campus 
Wednesdays 2 pm-4pm 
For An Appointment Call: 
Noel Nicolle, Director 
Student Rights And Legal 
Aid Room 222, Student Union 
357-4501 




urrent 




auce 



Vol, LXX No. 12 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




November 9, 1982 



Orze Formally InstalledAs NSU President 



Dr. Art Laf f er To 
SpeakNovember 16 



Dr. Joseph J. Orze was 
formally installed as Nor- 
thwestern's 15th president by 
Wiley Sharp, President, Board 
of Trustees for State Colleges 
and Universities, during the 
investiture convocation in 
Prather Coliseum on Nov. 5. 

Keynote speaker Alan W. 
Ostar announced Orze's 
appointment of president elect 
to the American Association 
for State Colleges and 
Universities. He said how 
'fortunate NSU is to have 
Orze's caliber of leadership' 
and 'Quality education is a 
primary goal at NSU', which 
Northwestern has carried out 
since 1884, he said. He also 
discussed 'Regionalism' and 
how a state university 
primarily serves those in its 
region. 

In the investiture address, 
'The Ecology of a University,' 
Orze summarized his goal for 
NSU as 'excellence and in- 
tegrity.' He later explained 
that in making perceptions 
realities, the university- 
needs to 'turn inwardly to 
assess its self-imaee;. while 
believing in one another so 



that others can do the same. 

Dr. Orze said that he 
considers himself a 'pragmatic 
idealist,' and that we need 
to have confidence when 
making goals and to see them 
'worthy of attainment' while 
setting priorities to achieve 
them. 

Dr. Orze went on to say that 
the unversity as an 
'educational environment' 
should identify strengths as 
well as weaknesses, building 
upon strengths and either 
correct weaknesses, or realize 
sometimes that it is necessary 
to delete these programs. 
Since 'universitites, like people 
'it cannot be all things to all 
people.' 

Three areas were cited by 
Orze as examples of where he 
sees 'excellence within the 
University or the potential for 
its development.' First was 
the College of Education, 
which he said must 'diligently 
reassess itself and the scope of 
its programs: It can and must 
be on of the pinnacles of 
excellence.' 

Next, in talking about the 
College of Nursing, soon to 



NSU Graduates Rank High 
In Law School Study 



A study of first-year per- 
formances at the Louisiana 
State University Law School in 
Baton Rouge reveals that in 
1980-81 Northwestern 
graduates had the highest rate 
°f success among students 
receiving their undergraduate 
Pre-law training at Louisiana 
Public universities other than 
LSU. 

According to "Performance 
°l LSU Law Students: The 
1980-81 Freshman Class," 
*ntch was published in the 
summer issue of "Louisiana 
Law Review," nine of the 15 
s[ udents from Northwestern 
*ho entered the LSU Law 
^hool that year were suc- 
cessful and declared eligible to 
enro, l for the second vear of 
studies. 

The 60 percent success rate 
t0r Northwestern 's pre-law 
graduates in their first year of 
» w school was the highest for 
he nine institutions classified 
' n the study as Louisiana 
Public universities. 



Northwestern also ranked 
third overall in the study's 
evaluation of success rate by 
universities. Ahead of 
Northwestern were Centenary 
College-3 of 4 for 75 percent- 
and LSU Baton rouge, 106 of 
151 for 70percent. 

As a group, students trained 
at the undergraduate level at 
the nine Louisiana public 
universities ranked third 
behind LSU-Baton Rouge's 70 
percent success rate and the 
56? achieved by students from 
out of state. 

According to the study, one- 
third of the LSU Law School's 
freshman class in 1980-81 
came from the Louisiana 
public universities. 

Conducting the research for 
the study and authoring the 
article in the official journal of 
the LSU Law School were 
Carolyn Hoper Hargrave, 
provost and vice-chancellor 
for academic affairs at LSU, 
and Lee Hargrave, a professor 
of law at LSU. 



offer the Ph.D. program, he 
described, as a 'recognized 
pinnacle of excellence.' It also 
has new facilities undergoing 
construction. 

Finally Dr. Orze touched on 
the A. A. Fredericks Center 
for the Creative and Per- 
forming Arts soon to become 
an even greater asset to NSU 
and to the school of arts. 
There are, of course, other 
areas that have excellence and 
potential for development, 
said Orze. 

He emphasized how ef- 
fective winning athletic teams 
are in recruitment, mentioning 
that those who support 
athletics usually do the same 
for academics. Believing that a 
healthy mind is related to a 
healthy body, athletics are a 
'complement' to academics. 
He then praised NSU's In- 
tramural department and 
announced the 'refurbishing 
and expansion of the building 
is the number one capital 
outlay priority for the 
university and is among the 
top three priorities of our 
Board of Trustees.' 



Arthur B. Latter, author ol 
the supply-side theory of 
economics and the man w hose 
'Laffer's Curve' was the basis 
of President Reagan's 
economic policy will speak on 
Tuesday November 16 at 11 
a.m. in K y s e r Hall 
Auditorium. 11 o'clock classes 
will be dismissed for the 
second presentation in the 
NSU Distinguished Lecture 
Series. The lecture is open to 
the public, free of charge. 

He first drew the diagram 
for his 'Laffer's Curve' on a 
restaurant napkin in 1974 to 
show a colleague how tax cuts 
could increase government 
revenue. Most of the economic 
establishment dismissed the 
Latter Curve as too simplistic 

Laffer's curve shows that as 
tax rates rise from zero, 
revenues increase-but only 
until an oplimun point is 
reached. If taxes arc increased 
further, he says, they 
discourage consumer spending 
and business investment, thus 
reducing revenues. 

Laffer's star began to rise 
when Proposition 13 became a 
popular cause in California. 



He was tagged the "guru of 
the tax revolt" by writers of 
different publications familiar 
with the tax-cutting sentiments 
of both the state's electorate 
and Laffer. 

The day of the Proposition 
13 vote he flew home to cast 
his "yes" vote and was greeted 
at Los Angeles International 
airport by state Republican 
leaders asking him what they 
should pursue next. 
Alter that, his rise to celebrity 
did not curve but shot straight 
up. He was the first economist 
candidate Ronald Reagan 
asked to support his campaign 
and Laffer's proposals have 
been examined in every majoi 
newspaper and magazine in 
the country. Laffer currently 
is a member of the President's 
Economic Advisory Board. 

Laffer supports Reagan 
though he readily admits that 
he does not agree with the 
President on many issues. 
"The economics, of course, 
lake priority," Laffer says. 
"They might not always if the 
economy was not in such 
trouble, but now they have to, 
and I agree with Reagan's 
views on that." 



IET Program Granted Full A ccrediation 



The accreditation board of 
the Nataional Association of 
Industrial Technology has 
granted full accreditation for 
two years to the baccalaureate 
degree program in industrial 
technology at Northwestern. 

Northwestern is the first 
college or university in 
Louisiana to have an in- 
dustrial technology program 
at the associate, baccalaureate 
or masters level accredited by 
the professional organization. 

Dr. Charles Wommack, 
head of the Department of 
Industrial Education and 
Technology at NSU, said the 
National Association of In- 
dustrial Technology has 
recognized only 26 programs 
in industrial technology 
nationwide as meeting its 
standards for accreditation. 

"Our department, which 
prepares undergraduate 
students for managment 
position in industry, has been 
strengthened through the 
f/forts of the faculty and 
administration during the 
year-long accreditation study 
to ensure that the department 
met the rieid standards of the 



organization," stated 
Wommack . 

He added, "The recognition 
given the industrial technology 
program by an outside 
organization was very en- 
couraging. Program direction 
provided by representatives of 
education and industry should 
have long-range benefits for 
Northwestern." 

Wommack was in San 
Francisco last month when the 
association's accreditation 
board reviewed Nor- 



th western's application and 
on-site evaluation report. He 
was notified this week that the 
program has been granted lull 
accreditation. 

North western's Department 
of Industrial Education and 
Technology applied for ac- 
creditation in 1981, and in the 
spring of 1982 a three-member 
accreditation team visited the 
NSU campus to conduct an 
evaluation of the four-year 
program. 



Run-Offs For Mr. And Miss NSU 

am 





Cindy Duke Alison Breazeale JoeStamey Lyll Allen 



Alison Breazeale, Cindy NSU last Wednesday, and 

Duke, Lytt Allen, and Joe now the four will meet again in 

Stamey won the primary a runoff this Wednesday for 

elections for Mr. and Miss the University's highest honor. 



1 ^ 



Current Sauce, Page 2, November 9, iy»z 



Dr. Ford Attends scmla Christmas Festival ConcertTickets 



Dr. Christine Pickering 
Ford attended the thirty-ninth 
meeting of The South Central 
Modern Language Association 
in San Antonio, October 28- 
30, where she chaired the 
Modern Drama session. Prior 
to this chairmanship, Dr. Ford 
has presented papers on Henry 
Adams and Eugene O'Neill. 

On campus, Dr. Ford is an 
Assistant Professor of English 
in the Department of 
languages. The founding 
sponsor of ARGUS, the 
University's multi-media 
magazine. Dr. Ford is also 
sponsor of Sigma Tau Delta, 

Choir Received 
Well By Audience 

The 1982-83 NSU Artist 
Scries opened Tuesday night, 
November 2, with a per- 
formance by the Norman 
l.uboff choir. The 8 p.m. 
concert, held in the Concert 
Recital Hall of Northwesiern's 
new A. A. Fredericks Center 
for the Creative and Per- 
forming Arts, was performed 
before a crowd of over 400 
which included NSU sludents, 
faculty, staff and people of the 
Na ( eh i t oc lies com m u n i t y . 

Concert -goers did not seem 
to mind silting in the portable 
folding chairs set up in the 
recital hall -since most of the 
furniture for the center is not 
ycl available. At least twenty 
persons were standing in the 
back of the hall or silling in 
i he aisles. 

The choir was well-received 
by Ihc crowd and was awarded 
a standing ovation at iheir 
performance's end. 

The choir's performance 
included songs form the I7ih 
century to ihc 20ih century by 
such composers as Frederick 
Handel, vivaldi, Verdi, Pablo 
Casales, Hoffman, and 
Robert Schumann. One 
number especially enjoyed by 
the crowd was "Saul", written 
by Hoffman. "Saul", 
combining naraiion with 
singing, told the biblical story 
of (he conversion of the 
disciple Saul on the road to 
Damascus. 

The Norman Luboff choir* 
was well received by the 
audience and was awarded a 
standing ovation at their 
performance's end. They 
performed three extra 
numbers as encores. 

With over 50 LPs, a decade 
of concert engagements, and 
many television appearances 
to i heir Credit, the Norman 
Luboff Choir is composed of 
18 singers —9 males and 9 
females- a pianist, and the 
conductor/composer Norman 
Luboff. According to Tony 
Smith, NSU Artist Series 
chairman, "The Norman 
Luboff Choir is certainlvthe 
most professional vocal group 
louring America today". 



the English honorary society, 
and chairman of the 
Publications Committee. 



Featuring Milsap Available 




DR. CHRISTINE FORD 

Runion Elected 
To The APGA 

Dr. Keith Runion, Associate 
Professor of Education 
Psychology and Student 
Services at North western, has 
been elected to the senate of 
Ihc American Personnel and 
Guidance Association. 

He was one of three 
senators from the APGA's 
Southern Region Branch 
Assembly, which has members 
in 14 stales, chosen this week 
in New Orleans to serve three- 
year lerms beginning in July of 
1983. 

Runion, who earned his 
doctorate at the University of 
Arizona, is chairman of the 
Division of Counseling and 
Guidance at NSU and a pasi 
president of the Louisiana 
Personnel and Guidance 
Association. 



The Student Union 
Governing Board of NSU will 
present Ronnie Milsap in 
Concert on Saturday, 
December 4, 1982, at 8:30 
p.m. in Prather Coliseum at 
NSU. This is a major en- 
tertainment attraction of the 
56th Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival. 

All students will be admitted 
free, provided they pick up 
tickets prior to the concert in 
Room 214 of the Student 
Union. If an effort to better 
serve the students who pay 
student activities fees, it is 
advised that all full-time 
students pick up tickets in 
advance. Tickets are priced at 
$10 in advanced and $13 at the 
Coliseum box office the night 



of the concert. 

Current single releases for 
Ronnie Milsap include 
"Inside," released in October 



on RCA Records. Current 
album releases include "Inside 
Ronnie Milsap" on RCA 
Records. 



Robert Elliot To Instruct 
Course In Real Estate 



A principle of real estate 
course will be offered from 
Nov. 22 to Dec. 18 by the 
Department of Business 
Administration and 
Economics ai Northwestern 
State University. 

NSU finance professor 
Robert S. Elliott will be in- 
structor that is required by 
■slate law for certification in 
the real estate profession. 

The real estate course, 



which will cost $130 for 
participation, will be con- 
ducted on Tuesdays from 6 
p.m. to 8 p.m. and on 
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Classes will meet in 
Room 110 of the Business 
Administration Building. 

To pre-register for the 
principles of real estate course 
at NSU, call Robert S. Elliott 
at 357-5161. 



Student Union Governing Board InProcess 
Of Changing Game Room Into "The Pub" 



The Student Union 
Governing Board is in the 
process of changing the at- 
mosphere of part of the 
Student Union Games Area. 
Bui as with project of such 
magnitude at a university, it 
cannot be accomplished 
without student input. All 
students of Northwestern 
Slate University will have 
equal access to this project- 
before it is completed because 
of their input and after it is 
completed with their support 



of the facility. 

For the past few years the 
SUGB has been working on 
his project in the Games Area 
that would basically enhance 
the social needs of the NSU 
students as well as the faculty. 
Once completed the area 
should provide a better place 
for entertainment at NSU. 
The SUGB tries to fill those 
hours that the student is not in 
the classroom or studying and 
this area in the Games Area 
would fill some of this idle 



time. 

For lack of a better name 
this area in the back of the 
Games area is being referred 
to as "The Pub." It will be a 
place for students to meet 
socially after class and provide 
an area for coffeehouse type 
entertainment. 

If anyone is interested in the 
project and would like to be in 
on this major renovation, 
contact Floyd James, 2nd 
Vice-President of the SUGB. 



V 



o 



t 

e 

W 
e 

d 
n 

e 

s 

d 

a 

y 








Ihom.ts Wolie. --.lid it. And it>'s largcb duo to 
i>ui Free f nterprjse svsteni that many of these 
miracles occur. No one ever said our sysjeiri 
Was the pertei I one. But no one h.Ts e\or been 
able lo ((line up with a better one. either. 
Free Enterprise W.ork>. And it will go on 
woi king. 

/Vierjje Prodiu vr- \\ hn fjje/ft*Vc> m Amenc .iS / iittifP. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES INVESTING 
IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

t ftUtji I ourM.i'i.t | irt Ir/t 4 i*itjun\ l ',tih ^tUf*'" t tihtii'* t •■oi/t.HU 
/ 1 'ww.in.i nnti'l A / f.y/if t nm/i.im \cv\ ( >f /»•.»/»» I\ihlti N-'iiir ftni 
*h •!* rfutmivrn / li-i ttn l\ >wn t > ►otfxrm 



^\ ye YanKee farmers 

sje S V°° K enou S* fetrave\ 
^% ei ° od y° urna ^e spot 




This was a popular song oi the 1&f0'> al the 
time oi tlie Westward migration! The idea, 
that it you've enough spunk you can make 
an\ thing ol vour lot. is the basjs ol our Free 
Enterprise svstem. And it'-, a pieih sate bet 
that most ot U-. wouldn't like living with any 
other system, free Enterprise uorkv And it 
will go on working 



Pm-rey Pmihu cr- U /in Mi< 



Al 



ivic j's f i/tore 



LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES INVESTING 
IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

< rntut I ••ifiM.tn.t / A-, tut ( .lAifum ( .ult VM'lr> ' tthtu-- ( Lfn/um 
/ I'li^M'M hiWl'l A / t^hl ( MNlfUm \i a f Hlr.in. /'i/Mn Settn fV'V^f 

Htth\\r<tvtii I U-i tin ftmtf < <»<nmm ' \> ~ 



November 9, 1982. Current Sauce. Page 3 





9 ^ 




A few weeks ago as I was flipping through Parade magazine, 
an interesting article caught my eye. Since this was right before 
Halloween and the moving of NSU's acclaimed ghost, Isabella, 
anything having to do with spirits or unusual happeningsquickly 
captured my attention. 

I have read many ghost stories, but somehow this one has 
remained on my mind. I really believe it is because of my 
sympathy for the lost souls of those who have lost their loves. It 
is for that reason I would like to share this story with you. I 
hope that because Halloween is over you may feel a deeper 
emotion other than fright. 

Judith was the daughter of Robert Sheegog, the man who 
built Rowan Oak-a big white house in Oxford, Mississippi in 
1844. She was a lovely, strong-willed, black-haired 14 year old 
when the Yankees came to Oxford for the first time during the 
War Between the States. She fell in love with her blue-coated 
soldier the moment she saw him. And, although their time 
together was all too brief, she believed with all her heart that, 
after he left her to rejoin his Illinois regiment, he would come 
back for her as soon as he could. 

The war years were long and hard, but Judith waited 
patiently. When she heard that Yankee soldiers were entering 
Oxford for the second time, she did not doubt that her Yankee 
would be with them and that he was coming back to claim her, 
his only love. 

As the Yankees swarmed into the town square and put their 
torches to the clapboard buildings, Judith waited, calmly in the 
shawdows of a huge magnolia tree at home, barely a mile from 
the blazing devastation. Her small bag was packed, hidden 
beneath the low-hanging branches, and she wore her only good 
dress. She knew he would come, and she was ready. She waited 
all night and through the endless hours and minutes of the next 
day. 

By twilight, she knew that he was never going to come for her. 

She slowly climbed the wide steps that led to her bedroom, 
where she carefully unpacked her bag and put her things away. 
She smoothed her dress and walked out onto the balcony high 
above the brick wall below. She looked out into the tall cedars 
that bordered the driveway as if she were seeing it all for the first 
time. 

No one knows whether Judith jumped or fell from the 
balcony, but her parents buried her beneath the old magnolia 
tree where she had waited for her Yankee. 

Today, the spirit of Judith is still alive. She made her presence 
felt as recently as last Halloween, in the Parlor of Rowan Oak, 
which the University of Missippi now maintains as a museum. 
At twilight, when the day's guests were gone and the old house 
was silent, the assistant curator was alone in the kitchen. He 
heard soft strains of a Chopin Waltz. Someone was playing the 
piano. Puzzled at how someone could have entered the locked 
house after visiting hours, he hurried through the dining room 
toward the parlor. Just as he entered the doorway, the music 
ceased. He stared intently into the still, quiet parlor. There was 
no one there at all-except, of course, Judith. -Lesa Hatley 



hdilor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 

Co-News Editor 
Barbi Hail 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Asst. News Editor, 
Susan Arthur 

Dean Napoli 
Circulation Manager 



Advertising Manager 
Alison Breazeale 

Co-News Editor 
Lisa W illiams 

Sports Editor 
Koger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Diana Gratton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saviors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatley 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Current Satin it the officii! publication of 
the student body of Northwestern Slate 
University m Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under Ihe act of 
March 3. II7«. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
(he exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. Ii is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times, Highway I 
South, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
arc located in room 224. Am and Sciences 
Building Telephone number is 357-J4So. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are V* yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable (o Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce, 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana 7I4S7. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
SO0 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number J579 to Current 
Sauce, NSU, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 



Cut The Bull And Play Ball 




by John L. Hess 

On Sundays in TV-land, the 
empty hours between mor- 
nings services and the first 
ballgames are whiled away by 
heavy talk about public af- 
fairs. On one recent Sabbath, 
they invited Background Noise 
to comment on labor relations 
in pro football. 
He blew his 
* : stack. 

It seems that 
the peasants 
were demand- 

John Hess in « a share ° f 
the gross. The 

old charmer 

snorted : 

"Management takes all the 

risk!" 

After a thoughtful pause, 
one of the panelists said: 
"Howard, what about the 
player who gets crippled in his 
first season?" 

Never at a loss, Howie 
snapped: "He knew the 
chance he was taking." 

Only those who never watch 
football will think I made that 
up. 

Howie and I are old enough 
to remember when fans and 
journalists alike identified 
with the home team. That of 
course meant the players; it 
was dimly known that they 
had owners, but hardly 
anybody even knew their 
names. 

Then one day the Brooklyn 
Dodgers were sold to Los 
Angeles, and pro ball became 
a business like any other. The 
name on the shirt might say 
Mudville, but that was only 
until some other town made a 
better offer. 



As I write, the city of 
Oakland is in court trying to 
keep the Raiders from 
skipping to L.A. It tried a 
novel apprach: to seize the 
team by right of eminent 
domain, the way it might take 
property for a downtown 
development. 

It lost the first round, and 
will probably lose all. The 
courts are reluctant to mess 
with private property unless it 
stands in the way of a 
developer's bulldozer. 

Yet the city has a point. The 
name of Oakland or Mudville 
or whatever belongs to the 
place. Why shouldn't the team 
belong to the team belong to 
the town, the way a school 
team belongs to a school? 

The New York Yankees 
belong to one George 
Steinbrenner, who may be the 
most disagreeable master since 
Simon Legree. His chattels, 
last year's champions, publicly 
plead to be sold down the river 
rather than toil in his cotton 
fields at any price. 

Jaded by Steinbrenner's 
snarls of class hatred for his 
losers, the local sports writters 
have given up. They now 
shrug and say, "Well, it's his 
team." 

Yet New York's taxpayers 
have invested well more than 
$20 in the Yankees for every 
dollar Steinbrenner put in. 
Just before he bought the 
club, the city bought Yankee 
Stadium and rebuilt it, 
allegedly to keep the club from 
departing. 

It could have acquired the 
cub for $10 million. Counting 
interest, the stadium bill many 



top $250 million. 

The city can't afford to 
repair its bridges or police its 
streets, but it has just granted 
$5 million a year in tax sub- 
sidies to keep its hockey team 
from pulling out. 

The argument is that the 
team brings big bucks into 
town. But the hotel keepers, 
theater owners and restaurants 
who receive these bucks do not 
volunteer to shell out a few to 
keep the team in town. 

The problem is that we 
Americans don't savvy private 
enterprise the way Adam 
Smith did. From his ob- 
servation of businessmen in 
Britain, Smith noted their 
penchant to rig the game. He 
said they never met together 
but what they'd end in a 
conspiracy against the public. 

Pro sports became a cartel 
early on. A cartel is the op- 
posite of free enterprise. The 
owners locked up the market, 
and traded players like cattle. 
An infamous Supreme Court 
opinion held that sports were 
not a business and therefore 
athletes were not entitled to 
the protection of the 14th 
Amendment or the Sherman 
Act. 

Unions finally emancipated 
the slaves. Then along came 
the TV megabucks, and the 
business spun out of control. 
The game is still a good show, 
in some ways better than ever, 
but the audience, isolated in its 
living rooms, has itself become 
a commodity to be traded like 
the players of yore. 

Wouldn't it be nice to return 
the game to the players and the 
fans? 



Ghost Moving A Success 



Dear Editor: 

The ghost Isabella is moved 
and has a new home. The last 
lime we spoke with her she 
expressed her surprise at the 
large number of NSU 
students, Natchitoches citizens 
and other friends who joined 
her in her historic journey. 
Some crowd estimates reach as 
high as 750 people and 
needless to say, we were all 
very pleased. Although you 
may have only seen a few 
people working hard that 
nigh I, there were many people 
who had worked very hard 
behind the scene lo help 
produce the Halloween night 
extravaganza. 1 would like to 
thank all those people: they 
include Loran Lindscy,, 
August Baxter, Camillc 
Hawthorne, Dr. Sally Hum, 
Robert Oje, Nolan Bailey, Dr. 
Dennis Oneal, Melvin 
Moreau, all ihe fine and 
helpful employees at the NSU 
Booksiore, Michael W. Atkins 
and Nan Stevenson for an- 
swering ihe phone for our last 
minule questions and help. 
Troop E, Dei. 1 of the 256th 
Cavalry, Louisiana National 



Guard and the Natchitoches 
Municipal Airpori for their 
special effects assistance, Scoit 
Repp- for last minule stand- 
ins, Jim and Anna Bechtel, 
Debbie Keene, Joe Cun- 
ningham, Jim Johnson and 
Don Sepulvado lor their quick 
action, Mrs. Ora Williams for 
the history and background 
information, Mr. Richard 
Senate of Ventura, Ca. for his 
ghostly advice, Joe Stamey 
and the SGA for all (heir help, 
Alicia Haynes and the SUGB 
for all their help and for the 
use of their equipment, all the 
NSU fraternities, sororities 
and organizations who came 
out to participate, the fine 
people of Natchitoches for 
joining NSU in our 
celebration, the NSU mar- 
ching band for adding the 
necessary sounds and music 
for our little march, Tammy 
Lloid for her provisions and 
help and of course, Tommy 
Whitehead for his ad\ice, 
phone numbers and support. 

Of course none of this could 
have been possible without the 
fantastic work of the staff of 
KNWD. Their advice, input 



and cooperation in producing 
the move was key to iis suc- 
cess. These people behind the 
scenes were; Paul Rino, Ginny 
Whitaker, ' Randy Adcock, 
Ferrell Sonnier, Tommy 
Mayweather, Ted Schouien, 
Gary (state queen jester) 
Minhardi, Stephanie Samuels, 
Lisa Denmon, Jeff Harris, 
John Luitrell, and Cecile 
Salizman. Special thanks go 
out to Greg Lloid for all the 
time, running around, la' e 
night work, advice 
suggestions, and so forth and 
so on etc. etc.. It would have 
been impossible without your 
help. Also special thanks go 
oui 10 Leslie Gregory for your 
work as Isabella and fig 
enduring the human element 
on your special voyage. 
Someday, you'll be a star. 

A special and separate 
(hanks go to our very own Dr- 
Joseph Orze for encouraging 
the return of a sense of humor 
and fun to the Northwestern 
State University campus. : 
(Now, about the bathrooms 
for KNWD....) 
Eric B. Maron 
General Manager. KNWD 



■ 



November 9. 1982, Current Sauce, Page 5 



Commentary 

Let 's Leave Isabella A lone 



What Kind Of Class 
Cutter Are You 



Dear Joe: 

While il is true that our lives 
are full of uncertainly, there 
are certain matters about 
which we have no doubt. 
There are rules of behavior, so 
to speak, that we hold to be 
true. For instance, a golfer 
does not head out in a 
lightning storm for a quick 
eighteen holes dressed in his 
best aluminum foil suit. 
Especially if his language is 
prone to the typical exhor- 
tations to God that ac- 
company wayward five-iron 
shots. In the same light, a 
photographer doesn't stand at' 
an arm's length from the 
space-shuttle upon lift-off just 
to get a good shot at the 
exhaust fumes. Even more to 
the point, it's common 
knowledge that you don't 
stand in a bear's cage and slap 
him in the face for not ob- 
serving proper table manners 
while you are feeding him. 
(Doubly important if the bear 
is coming off a hunger strike.) 
To list a few less obvious 
points, you wouldn't steal the 
Bat-mobile, laugh during 
confession, eat Iberville food 
with a hangover. ...but you get 
my drift. It is these subtle 
little standards of behavior 
that make life's real choices 
easier. With this in mind, 1 
ask you why certain folks at 
Northwestern would want to 
irritate a ghost who has just 
recently burned the most 
valuable building on campus? 
Permit me to explain. 

Ghosts, by their very 
nature, have difficulty 
communicating with persons 
the flesh. This problem 
stems from the fact that 
ghosts, with the notable ex- 
ception of Caspar, can't 
speak. As a result, they must 
communicate in other ways. 1 
read with interest the sup- 
posedly chilling accounts of 
Isabella, Northwestern's 
ghost-in-residence, turning 
radio dials and appearing at 



odd hours of the morning, 
purportedly to scare some 
Northwestern coeds. Has it 
occurred to anyone that 
Isabella may not have liked the 
radio station in question? 
How better to communicate 
this dislike than a mere spin of 
the dial? As for the late night 
appearances, she probably 
wanted everyone to leave. 
Quickly. Judging by the 
typical reaction to a ghost's 
presence, I would say this is an 
effective way to convey her 
dissatisfaction with her 
company. Bear in mind, this 
is all by way of a lesson 
illustrating the manner in 
which ghosts communicate; 
with actions not words. 

Considering all of this, you 
can imagine my dismay at the 
recent, much publicized at- 
tempt to move Isabella from 
her age-old home on scenic 
Normal Hill to a spot in that 
tenement of a woman's gym 
(across the street from a 
laundrymat for God's sake). 
Talk about your classic errors. 
The old bag didn't want to 
move from Caldwell. She just 
wanted some peace and quiet, 
i.e. everyone out and don't 
come back. I could imagine, 
then, her shaking her head in 
disbelief thinking that she'd 
burned Caldwell for nothing. 
The perpetrators of the "move 
the ghost" fiasco need to 
brush up on their ghostese. 
Anyone who can become 
invisible and walk through 
walls can almost certainly 
manage to move herself to a 
new neighborhood if she so 
desires. Therefore, lest 
Caldwell Hall have burned in 
vain, let us make no mistake 
about the whereabouts of 
Isabella. Northwestern can 
hardly afford to lose another 
building by provoking the ire 
of a ghost (A female ghost no 
less). The following is sub- 
mitted, then, not so much in 
rebuttal to a crass ceremony, 
as to pay retribution to an 



offended spirit. To set the 
record straight, this is 
dedicated to Isabella. 

Self rightcusly yours, 
Mike Rukavina 



Isabella 
I'm sure she laughed a little 
when they tried to move her 
soul. 

Seems no one learned the 
lesson 

of her inferno's sooty toll. 

Passed many years, a small 
request- 

a place to call her own. 

A fortnight before Halloween 

she let her wrath be known. 

Isabella wanted space; 
Normal Hill was her demand. 
The fire was her construction- 
Isabella clearning land. 

So please take note, there's no 
one 

in the building they proclaim. 
Around the ruins of Caldwell 
the ghost will still remain. 

The nosey crowd that gathered 
at that commercialized event, 
only moved a name (hat night. 
Isabella never went. 

Forget decrepit women's 
gyms. 

The lady lurks not there. 
She set a fire to burn a place 
she simply wouldn't share. 

Ceremonies don't ,move 
ghosts. 

Must you all again be shown? 
Her soul just wanted breathing 
room. 

Leave Isabella alone. 

And come each late October, 
and the feast of Halloween, 
beware the one room school 
house. 

Likely there's where she'll be 
seen 

-Mike Rukavina- 



Letter to The Editor 



Dear Editor, 

I noticed in last week's 
Paper a letter from a student 
about the fire alarm situation. 
She was tired of the many 
anils and fake alarms. She 
w as right - someone could lose 
their life one day because of 
the immaturity of others. But, 
at least her dorm has fire 
alarms. Varnado has none. 
The burning of Caldwell has 
fnade us realize that it could 
Just as easily have been 
Varnado. Some of us in- 
stigated the dorm and found 
that not only are there not any 



fire alarms, but also many of 
the fire estinguishers are 
missing or have faulty gauges. 
Last Wednesday night we had 
quite a scare. The dorm 
smelled like smoke but firemen 
couldn't find a fire. Even- 
tually, they discoverd that a 
water pump in the buzenent 
had blown a fuse. It could 
have easily been a fire. How 
much does it take, people! We 
have already been given two' 
warnings. This university can 
shell out the money for a new 
Fine Arts Complex but not for 
fire alarms. Why have any 



rules about hot plates and 
cooking devices if you won't 
enforce them? Now is the time 
to do something about the 
situation. This university will 
not have to worry about fire 
alarms because if the situation 
remains the same they will 
soon have no students 
anyway. Some of the students 
were wondering which 
building on campus was the 
oldest after Caldwell Hall 
burned. At this rate, it will be 
Student Union! 

Sinerely, 
Susan Fortenberrv 



Students, Identify Yourselves! 

Although almost no student 
likes to admit that he oc- 
casionally cuts a class, almost 
every student realizes that 
cutting class is a definite 
option for him. Students whe 
cut class can be classified as 
one of three basic lypes.and 
the nonchalant type. 

The practical class cutler 
cuts class for "practical" 
reasons. Often, this student is 
one with neat notebooks, 
clean textbooks, and good 
posture. The "Practical" 
reasons for which this student 
cuts class usually concern 
health or grades. The practical 
type of class cutter may cut 
class to study for an exam in 
another class, or to do 
research at the library. Often, 
he is so practical that he 
manages to cut a class in which 
he is doing exceptionally well, 
and even then obtains the 
missed notes from the most 
intelligent and reliable source 
thai he can find. Sometimes 
the practical class cutter takes 
notice of his lack-luster eyes, 
dull expression, and tired 
body, which are the results ol 
his excessive studying, and 
decides to cut class to 
recuperate. Since this type of 
class cutter cuts class for such 
practical reasons, he is, more 
often than not, confident 
about his standing grades, and 
truthful to instructors who 
noticed his absence. 

The second type of class 
cutter is the reluctant type. 
Sadly enough, this type would 
like to believe that he is really 
the practical type. He tries to 
turn impractical reasons for 
cutting class into practical 
ones, and often succeeds in 
believing that he has done so. 
However, the reluctant class 
cutter never cuts class without 
a struggle. He always needs to 
be "talked into it"- either by 
himself or by a friend. He is 
the type who lies in bed for at 
least half an hour debating 
whether or not he can afford 
to miss the class meeting. The 
reluctant type of class cutter 
cuts class for a myriad of 
reasons. He may be 



exhausted, or lazy, he may 
need to cram for another class, 
or he may want to kill time 
with a good friend. The 
reluctant class cutter is 
reluctant because he is very 
conscientious about his 
grades. Often, he is the studel 
whose grade may shoot either 
up or down, and whose 
academic achievements are 
etrcmely sporadic. Because of 
his reluctance, this type of 
class cutter feels guilty when 
arriving for the next class 
meeting, makes a mad dash 
for missed work, and plays 
upon an instructor's sympathy 
when giving reasons for his 
absence. 

Our most relaxed type of 
class cutler is the nochalani 
type. The adventuresome, 
impulsive student may find 
himself in this classification of 
class cutters. The nonchalant 
class culler cuts class whenever 
something more appealing 
than class presents itself. This 
something is often sleep, 
which is why the nonchalant 
class culler is often nowhere to 
be seen on Monday morning. 
An advantage that this iype of 
class culler has is that his 
nonchlance allows him to feel 
free of guilt; However, I he 
nonchalant class culler is the 
student who usually hasn't an 
ioia of understanding during 
the new lesson, and who is the 
most anxious when progress 
reports are given out. 
Although this type of class 
culler is indeed nonchalant, he 
.is pragmatic enough tc 
fabricate to the instruct oi 
about why he missed class. 

Every type of class cutler 
culler hash is own advantages 
and disadvantages in his 
methods for cutting class. Ii is 
the advantages, coupled with 
the student's personality, that 
determine which classification 
of class cutlers a student finds 
himself in. Even (hough some 
students may not wish to 
classify themselves as a "class 
cutter" at all, the fact is thai 
when a sludent cuts class, he 
,is, invariably, cither practical, 
reluctant', or nonchalant about 
iit. 



The Current Sauce is 
looking for an advertising 
manager for the Spring 
semester, partial 
scholarship involved. 
Please contact us, Room 
225, Keyser, between 9-10 
MWF, 11-12 T-Th, 1-2 T-f. 
We can also be reached on 
Monday afternoons at the 
Natchitoches Times. 



Current Sauce, Page 6, November 9, 1982 



Don Hatley- From Cornfields To Folk Festival 



When Don Hatley was 
plowing corn on his family's 
farm in East Texas during the 
1940's and 50's, he often 
dreamed of what the future 
would hold for him. Four 
decades later, now holding a 
doctorate in English and 
calling the shots for the 
growing Natchtoches Folk 
Festival, Hatley marvels at the 
distance he has come since 
then. 

"Everything considered, life 
was pretty tough back then," 
Hatley said. "We raised 
mostly cotton and corn and of 
course sold some dairy 
products. That's how we 
made our living." 

Like most farmers of the 
day, the Hatley's borrowed 
money in the Spring and paid 
it back in the fall. However, 
sometimes when the yearly 
harvest was bad, pay back 
seemed almost impossible. 

"If you didn't have a good 
harvest then you couldn't pay 
back the loan. A lot of folks 
got into a never ending cycle 
of debt that way." 

Educated in the local Van 
Dyke community school and 
Later in Sulpher Springs, 
when the two schools were 
consolidated, Hatley credits his 
academic success at least 
partially to his mother, Gladys 
Hailey. 

"My mother really believed 
in the benefits of an educaton. 
She believed in the benefits of 
an education. She believed 
that the way to climb the 
social and economic ladder 
was through an education." 

During her prep years, 
Hatley's mother went through 
the 1 1 ih grade twice just so she 
could say that she had 12 years 
of schooling. 

"My two older brothers and 
I knew we were going to 
college. There was never any 
doubt about it. I guess we 
were kind of :rend setters in 
those days." 

Hatley's father quit school 
during his ninth grade year 
because his coach couldn't get 
him out of an Algebra class. 
That fact didn't hurt him 
much though as he later 
became a Trustee member of 
the school system. He also 
managed the local baseball 
team, Hatley remembers. 

After graduating from high 
school, Hatley attended 
college at East Texas State 
University where he received a 
B.A., M.A., and later Ph.D. 
in English at the age of 29. 

During this time, he married 
the former Michail Sue Skeen 
and since the two have had 
two children, Lesa 18, and 
John 7. 

In 1968, Hatley came to 
Northwestern as an assistant 
English professor. 

"NSU seemed to be the 
Louisiana equivalent of East 
Texas State. That's the reason 



I chose to teach here and of 
course the fact that this was 
the only school that offered 
me a mid-semester job." 
Besides being an educator 



and director of the Louisiana 
Folklife Center, Hatley has 
also held leadership positions 
on the NSU Faculty Senate 
and worked on the NSU 



branch of the America 
Federation of Teachers. 

Today's way of life certainly 
is nothing like it was back for 
the Hatley's on their 160 acre 



farm in Van Dyke, Tex. 

"I still like to remember 
back to those farming days, 
but I really don't think I'd like 
to go back," Hatley laughs. 




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November 9, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 7 



Organizations 



Kappa Alpha 



The Brothers of Kappa 
Alpha Order would like to 
welcome Dane Broussard, 
Steve Estep, and Lonny Carter 
into their Brotherhood and 
into their hearts. These three 
men have successfully been 
initiated into the mysteries of 
the Order on October the 
14th. 

The Brother's wish to ex-- 
press their deep sadness at the 
catastrophe that took place on 
campus the night that 
Caldwell Hall burned to the 
ground. However we were 
relieved to learn that no lives 
had been lost in the blaze. 

The actives would like to 
congratulate the pledge class 
on the successful completion 
of their fund raising project at 
Beau Fort Plantation. 

KA would like to thank the 
TRI SIGMAS for a great 
exchange and are looking 
forward to our next with great 
anticipation. 

Everyone had a real good 
time at TECH WEEKEND 
and we wish to convey to the 
football team that there is no 
dishonor in losing and that we 
know for the remainder of the 
season we can look forward to 
some exciting games. 

We all had fun at the 
"Moving of the Ghost" and 
were pleased to see the over-all 
participation of the NSU 
student body. 

In concluding we wish to 
congratulate President Orze 
on his inauguration. \Ve feel 
confident of his administrative 
Qualities and leadership 
abilities. And we pledge him 
our fullest support for the 
betterment of N.S.U. 



Phi Beta Sigma 



Culture for service; service 
for humanity. Phi Beta Sigma 
Fraternity assisted Phi Beta 
Sigma Sweets in giving a 
Halloween party for the 
children of North Street 
Community Center on Oc- 
tober 29. There were no tricks 
but a lot of treats thus making 
this event very special to the 
children. The Sigma Service 
continued as the frats painted 
the J.S. Clark nursery with the 
colors blue and white, of 
course. 

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity 
would like to greatly thank all 
the wonderful people who 
supported and participated in 
our third annual Sigma-Zeta 
Fall Talent Show. Through 
your effort the Talent Show 
successfully achieved its 
purpose as being an op- 
portunity for contestants to 
express their talents and also 
to gather can goods for our 
Thanksgiving Drive. The top 
four places went to: 
Third runner-up Lisa Morse 
Second runner-up Gerald 
Spencer and Band 
First runner-up Monica 
Harris 

Winner Debra Jones 



Sigma Kappa 



This week, November 7-13 

is designated, "Week of 

Giving" by Sigma Kappa 

Sorority. On Sunday, Nov. 7, 

the sorority attended mass at 

Holy Cross and on Monday, 

Alumni members "saw. 

slides and skits from fall Rush. 

Monday, Nov. 8 is 

"Founders Day" which marks 

108 years of sisterhood. Then 

on Tuesday, "Violet Day 

Donation" the chapter will 

make violets for the residents 

of Riverside Nursing Home 

whom they will visit on 

Wednesday. Sigma Kappa 

will have scrapbooks, jerseys 

etc. on displays in the library 

and Student Union lobby on 

Tuesday. A "campus 

beautification" program is 

planned for Thursday. The 

week will conclude with a 

sisterhood slumber party, 

Friday and a triple chapter 

rush workshop on Sat. in 

which sisters from La. Tech 

and Stephen F. Austin 

Universities will be par- 

ticinatine. , , , 
During parent s weekend, the 

chapter entertained many of 

our parents with rush skits 

and shared in a iambalaya 

dinner 



Student Louisiana Association Of Educators 



The Student Louisiana 
Association of Educators held 
their monthly meeting 
November 2, at 6:00 p.m. in 
the Teacher Education Center. 

Mrs. Posey ' from the 
Professional Development 
center was the guest speaker. 
She talked on how the 
Professional Development 
Center can help the teachers 
and students of education. 



Mrs. Posey also said that the 
Center served as a link bet- 
ween the State Education 
Department and the school 
systems of Louisiana On 
November 20th some members 
will be traveling to Lafayette 
for the state convention on 
November 20th some members 
will be traveling to Lafayette 
for the state convention on 
November 21st. 

I 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 

IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities, 
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



Equine Science 

The NSU Equine Science 
Club Judging Team will be 
traveling to Oklahoma City, 
Ok. to compete in the World 
Championship Quarter Hoist- 
Show, Nov. 19, according to 
Club Sponsor Kathy Baer. 

"We are really looking 
forward to the competition," 
state Baer. "We are hoping to 
do very well." 

Members of the club include 
Darla Vincent, Carol Phillips, 
Angela Parker, Susan Maack, 
and Lee Ann Shackelford. 

Darla Vincent and Donna 
Schafatz, two NSU Equine 
Science students, placed well 
in their respective categories at 
the Louisiana State Lair 
Quarter Horse Show, held in 
Shreveport, Oct. 29-31. 

Vincent placed third in the 
Halter Gelding 1980 category, 
while Schafatz received a 
fourth place in the Jr. English 
Pleasure category. 

Other NSU students who 
completed in the show were 
Frances Hanks, Carol 
Phillips, and Angela Parker. 

Rifle Team 

The ROTC Depart mem 
gave out three scholarships to 
deserving students at a 
ceremony on the 14th of 
October. Awarded were 
cadets . John Williams, 
Douglas Clark, and Thomas 
lien net t. 

The NSU Rifle Team took a 
2-0 record with them to 
Huntsville, Ark. on 22 Oct. 
They placed 6th out of 1 1 
teams that competing will be 
NSU, Northeast, Centenary, 
and Nicholls. 

The Orienteering Team 
attended a meet held at Camp 
Beauregard, La on 16-17 Oct. 
Cadet COL Andre Davis 
finished fourth in his aae 
group, and CPT Snclson 
finished an outstanding seend 
place in his category. Overall, 
the team placed a very 
respectable fourth in their 
division. 

There will be a retreat 
ceremony held on Nov. 1 1 at 
5:00 in the afternoon by the 
campus flagapole near the 
Student Union to honor those 
who gave their lives in war- 
time. All veterans and in- 
terested students are invited to 
attend. 

Mayor Joe Sampite has 
declared Nov. 12 as Armv 
ROTC Day. Brigadier 
General Gary B. Hutchinson 
will be visiting the campus as 
our guest on that day. He is 
scheduled to meet with the 
mayor and President Orze to 
help dedicate this 
proclamation. 



PRSSA 



The NSU Chapter of 
PRSSA held its meeting of 
Thursday on the second floor 
hall of Keyser. 

At the meeting, fund-raising 
ideas, future seminars, and 
attendance problems were 
discussed. On Saturday, 
November, 13, PRSSA will 
hold a window wash at 
Shamrocks from 12:00 noon 
until 4:00 p.m. 

Members represented 
PRSSA on family Day on 
Sal ui day, November, 6. The 
chapter will a I s o b e 
represented by Veronica Wolf 
entering in the LOB pageant. 

We still welcome any oilier 
interested students to our next 
meeting which will be held 
Thursday, November 11, 6:00 
p.m. in room 213. Keyser 
Hall. We always look forward 
to seeing new members. It's 
never too late lo take an 
important step. 

TKE 

Vollyball season got off to 
an excellent start for the 
brothers of the Epsiion Up- 
silon chapter of TAU KAPPA 
EPSILON. l or team no. 1 a 
2-0 record was posted. The 
victories came in defeating 
both the Sig Tau's teams. 
Team 2 fared almost as well. 
We split a scries with the dogs 
winning against 2, and, in a 
tight game, being by the 
Canines' first team. Now that 
team 2 has posted its first win 
we are more confident than 
ever to go on and post a 
winning record. The TKE's 
were out this past week 
helping to raise money for the 
Christmas Festival. Through 
all the participating frater- 
nities and sororities we 
managed to raise aloi of 
money. 

To end things up-remcmber 
this as the football season 
comes to an end: 

DEMONS: DO IT FOR A. L. 

University Players 

The NSU University Players 
will hold a meeting Tuesday, 
Nov . 9, at 6 p.m. in Room 122 
of the New Fine Arts Building. 
Highlighting the meeting will 
be a group tour of the new 
Fine Arts Building and an 
orientation of Northwestern's 
Theatre Department and the 
people involved in it. All 
interested persons are urged to 
get involved and see what's 
going on in the University 
Theatre. We're looking 
forward to a great year! 



Current Sauce, Page 8, November 9, 1982 



El Grande de Coca-Cola" Nov. 15 



By Beatrice Dawson 

Starting Nov. 15 and 
continuing through Nov. 19, 
"El Grande de Coca-Cola" by 
Ron House and Dig White, 
will be presented by the NSU 
Theatre Department. 

Directed by Nan L. 
Stephenson, director of 
theatre, the production will 
open every night at 7 p.m. in 
the Student Union Ballroom, 
with live music by Inda 
Espinoza, vocalist; Johny 
Espinoza, cautro player; and 
Ivan Maldonado, guitarist. In 
iddition, alcoholic beverages 
.vill be served at the cash bar. 

"El Grande de Coca-Cola' 
s the story of the zany 
Hernandez family and their 
impractical attempt to achieve 
stardom by pretending to be 
international stars in a show 
sponsored by their cousin, the 
local coca-cola bottler," 
explained Miss Stephenson, 
when asked about the plot of 
the play. 

The setting of the play is a 
coastal resort village in 
Honduras. The cast involved 
several people-who portray the 

Aviation Courses 
Restructured 

Larry Vamado, depart men I 
head of Aviation Sciences, 
says that there will be some 
changes made in the structure 
of their courses for the Spring 
semester. 

Aviation Science 105 and 
106 which arc ground school 
courcs for private pilot 
licenses will ow be offered 
twice a week on Mondays and 
Wednesdays from 5-8 p.m. 
rather than the previous tri- 
weakly 1 hour course. This 
( will enable it to become a half 
semester course. 

The main purpose for he 
restructure of the courses is to 
give local people a chance to 
enroll in a ground school 
course. Aviational Science 
105 and 106 are a good way 
forpeople possibly interested 
in aviation to discover if it is 
something they would like to 
pursue without becoming 
involved in a four year 
program. Aviational Science 
105 is not a pre-requisite for 
Aviational Science 106. 

Also the aviation depart- 
ment will be offering for the 
first time on the Natchitoches 
campus an air traffic control 
course. It will be listed as 
Aviational Technology 
Control (AVTC) 101. It is an 
introduction to air traffic 
Control 101. It is a classroom, 
lecture class. 

If you have any further 
questions please contact Larry 
Vamado at either 357-5102 or 
352-8412. 



family, and two stagehands- 
who want to be dancers and 
are distantly related to the 
family. 

Acting as mistress of 
ceremony will be Angie Rome, 
in her role as Pepita Her- 
nandez as she introduces 
various members of her family 
in this humorous musical 
revue, stated Nan. 



The other six members of 
the cast include Darlene 
Winslow, Marva Moxey, Ann 
Police, Betsy Corley, Tim 
LeBoeuf and Ben Bryant, 
along with the stagehands- 
Stephanie Ryals and Mitzi 
Adderly. The play is free for 
NSU students with IDs, $1.50 
for other students and Senior 
Citizens, and $3 for all others. 



Causey's 
Pharmacy 

Welcomes all NSU 

Students 
Shop our Specials 
and Save 

GO DEMONS 

40 7 Bienville 352-3141 




NEWS FROM THE 
PLACEMENT OFFICE 

With graduation just around the corner you may want to take 
advantage of these resources available in the Placement Office 
located in the Student Union, Room 305. 

1 . Up to date job vacancy newsletters from placement offices: 
Mississippi State 

Tennessee 
Virginia 
Syracuse 
Toledo 
Iowa State 
Southern Illinois 
Western Kentucky 
Kearney State 
Ball State 
Central Michigan 
Northwestern 

2. Educational Directories of High School in the following states: 

Louisiana 
Texas 
Arkansas 
Mississippi 

3. Overseas teaching opportunities 

4. Telephone directories from major cities in Louisiana and 
Texas. 

5. Career Opportunity UPDATE that lists thousands of current 
jobs available with hundreds of employers. 

6. Classified ads from all major newspapers in the state of 
Louisiana. 



Special Services 

NSU students that were 
registered with special services this 
semester are asked to come by and 
fill out some papers that were 
burned in the Caldwell Fire. 
Anyone else who needs help in 
tutoring, counseling, etc. is urged to 
come the old Trade School Building, 
next door to the old high school. 
The phone number is 357-5435. 



Important News From 
Financial Aid 

If you have been awarded Federal Financial Aid (Pell 
BEOG Grant, College Work Study, SEOG, NDSL, or 
SSIG) no action is necessary at the present time. 
Replacement Pell grant reports and ACT Need Analysis 
reports have been requested for you and will be mailed 
to our office. Replacement verification documents are 
not required for those students already receiving 
financial aid. 

Students who have not been awarded a Pell Grant 
must contact the Pell Grant Office, P.O. Box 92440, Los 
Angeles, CA 90009 and request duplicate copies of 
their Pell Grant reports. You may also call 800-638- 
6700 and request the duplicated copies. Verification 
documents may be requested by this office. Please 
bring the duplicate copies and verification documents 
(if requested) by our office as soon as possible. 
Replacement ACT Need Analysis copies have been 
requested for all students and will be mailed to this 
office. 

Students will need to come by the Financial Aid 
Office and renew their aid for Spring. If you renewed 
your aid before the fire, please come by and renew it 
again. If you do not plan to enroll for Spring '83, please 
contact this office in order that we may award your 
financial aid package to some other deserving student. 



Bojangles 

Tues. Nite - No cover charge 
$ 1 00 for all bar drinks. 
Wed. - Beer Bust - 9:00 pm - 
1:00 am $ 5 00 

Thurs. - All ladies admitted free 
- 1 st drink of choice free 
Coming soon - Billy Pendleton 
& Twilight, Opus, Pieces, 
Tytus-Hale & The Eyes. 
These exciting groups will be at 
Bojangles during Nov. & Dec. 
Appearing for the 1st time in 
Natchitoches "Opus" 
Super group that will knock 
your socks off, this Friday and 
Saturday - from Baton Rouge. 
You don't want to miss this 
group!!!! § 




November 9, 1982, Current Sauce, Page 9 



your adviser, discuss your schedule, classes 
You and your adviser should complete your trail 
Make sure your adviser signs your trial schedule 



ADVANCED REGISTRATION PROCEDURE 

Step 1 

November 1 1- 
November 19 

Go to your department head and get your packet and triajl 
schedule card. 
Step 2 

November 1 1- 
sjovember 19 

Set up an appointment with your adviser. 
Step 3 

November 11- 
Movember 19 
Meet with 
problems, etc. 
schedule card. 
:ard. 
Step 4 
Movember 22- 
November 24 

You should report to the Student Union Ballroom according 
to the schedule following. Bring with you: (A) registration 
packet, (B) trial schedule card with adviser's signature and (c) 
pencils and pens. 
Step 5 

Upon entering the Ballroom, the following sequence should be 
followed: (A) Pick up class cards, fill in your name and SSN on 
each card (INK ONLY), (B) complete in ink the front and back 
of the registrar's card.(C) go by your department head's table 
and have your packet checked and signed. (D) go to your 
Dean's table and have your packet checked and signed, (E) go to 
the Registrar's table. You should have your copy of the trial 
schedule card and packet. Your packet will be checked and left 
at this station. Your student's part of the trial schedule card will 
be stamped "ADVANCED REGISTRATION". This is your 
receipt that you have completed this phase of advanced 
registration. KEEP THIS RECEIPT IN A SECURE PLACE. 
You will need it later when vou pay your fees. 
Step 6 
9:00 A.M. 
January 10- 
January 1 1 

Come to the Student Union Ballroom. Pick up your fee sheet 
and student data sheet.Exarrsne the student data sheet closely. II 
ou see any errors, make changes on this sheet. Follow the lines 
through each station and pay your fees. Be sure to leave the 
student data sheet at the last station. You are now officially 
registered for the Spring Semester 
Noon 

January 12 
NOTE: 

If you cannot be here on January 10 or January 11 go to the 
information table at Prather Coliseum, and pick up your fee 
sheet and student data sheet and proceed through the assessment 
and paying line at the coliseum. The information table is located 
forward of the front door leading into the arena. 
First Day 
to Drop/Add 
January 17 

CHANGES IN YOUR SCHEDULE: 
Follow these steps: 

1. Fill out a drop/add card and have your adviser sign it 

2. If you wish only to drop a course, the regular 
procedure is followed. (First day January 17) 

3. If you wish to add courses, present your stamped schedule 
cancelled fee sheet at the information table. Obtain class 

c ard(s) for course(s) to be added. All courses to be added must 
be listed on the dmn/add card. Complete the processing on the 
first day o add. (Monday, January 17) 

REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 



drop 



Or 



November 22 
12:00 Noon M 
12:30 N 
1:00 
1:30 P-Q 
2:00 R 
2:30 S 
3:00 T 
3:30 U-V 
4:00 W 



4:30 



November 23 
12:00 Noon X-Y-Z 
12:30 
1:00 B 
1:30 C 
2:00 D 
2:30 E-F 
3:00 G 
3:30 H-l 
4:00 J-K-L 

5:30 Late Advanced Registrant; 



KNWD WEEKLY SCHEDULE 11/10-11/16 
Wednesday--6 p.m. Sundries with Neill Cameron and Bill 
Robert. Topic; Fear 

9 p.m. Retro-Rock - Live Santana - Part 2 
11 p.m. Concert Dream-One Hour of Bruce Springsteen. 
Thursday-Regular Progressive Music Format 
Friday—Regular Progressive music Format 
Saturday-12 noon Soul Show with Bubba Soileau 
Sunday -i p.m. Conternpory Christian Music Program with 
! Renee Quick 

3 p.m. Jazz Connection with George Williams' 

6 p.m. Rolling Stone Magazine Continuous History of Rock and 
Roll Program: The Producers 

7 p.m. Seventh Day - Seven albums played in their entirety 
Monday-9 p.m. Concert Dream - Thin Lizzy 

11 p.m. Interntional Music Program with Jairo Serrato 
Tuesday-Two in a row all day long 



Placement Office 
Job Interviews for 
Remainder of Fall Semester 

Interviewing seniors and graduate students 
graduating in December, May or July. 

November 9 First National Bank Accounting, 

Finance 

November 10 L'Oreal Business 
November 1 - U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. Business 
November 1 7 •- Chevrolet Central Office 4 year 

Computer Majors 
November 18 Creighton University Graudate School 
November 1 8 - Dept. of Revenue & Taxation Ac 

counting, Business 
November 1 8 Caddo Parish School Board Education 
November 1 8 -- Investors Diversified Services 

Business , Any Major 
November 30 Con Agra Business, Accounting, 

Agricultural Degrees 
December 2 South Central Bell Business 

Administration 
Math, Physics, Marketing 
December 3 - U.S. Air Force All Majors 

The Placement Office 
Student Union, Room 305 
357 5621 

Please call or come by and select a time to interview 
if you are interested in any of the compaines. Simply 
stated, we enjoy helping you. Come see us! 



Demon 
Playground 

Last week the intramural 
department began the 
volleyball season with a full 
list of games. 

In the women's division 
AKA opened their season with 
a win by way of forfeit by the 
Tri-Sigs, due to a lack of 
players. Zeta Phi Beta look 
two of three from Phi Mu bv 
scores of 15-6, 8-15, and 15-9.' 

Brotherhood forfeited to 
Los Amigos, while the Jocks 
had an easy time beating 
YANG Two 15-3, and 15-4. 
E'Raps didn't have much 
trouble either, as they stuck 
G.D.I. Omen 15-5, 15-4. Phi 
Beta ^igma also had little 
trouble in their first match of 
the season as they tanged 
ThelaChi 15-5, 15-6. 

KA took care of Sig Tau's 
second team with a 15-4, 15-10 
victory. Sig Tau's first learn; 
however, came away with 
identical scores of 15-6 in their 
triumph over Kappa Sig's 
second learn. The Sig Dog's 
first team took a season 
opening 15-9, 15-7 win over 
TKE's second team, in the last 
match of the night. 

On Tuesday Delta Psi 
Kappa walloped Delia Zeia 
15-0, 15-3. Zeta Phi Beta 
improved their record lo 2-0 
with a 15-6, 15-12 decision 
over Sigma Kappa. 

UnKappa 5th number two 
forfeited to VIP's First leant. 
Women's 3-V was awarded a 
victory when Odyssey had to 
forfeit also. The game that 
was scheduled to be played 
between VIP's second team 
and UnKappa 5th's first team 
was posponed because neither 
team showed up. 

KA advanced to 2-0 when 
they defeated Theta Chi, in the 
best-of-three series 16-18, 15- 



SGA SGA Attorney On Campus 
Free Legal Aid: Wednesdays 2-4 

For Appointments Call 
Noel Nicolle, Director 
.Student Rights And 
Legal Aid 357-4501 

Room 222, 
Student Union 



Cuiroii^Sauce^age^)jNovembei^^^82 



Sports 



Roger's Voice 

By Roger Reynolds 



Roark Leaves NSU For North Texas State 



Football Out, 
Basketball In 



It's time now to go from the 
football field to the round ball 
court and Coach Wayne Yates 
and the Demons. Demon 
basketball starts on November 
18 with the Demons playing an 
exhibition game against the 
National Team of Yugoslavia. 
The game is being sponsored 
by the Natchitoches Lions 
Club with procedes going to 
the Lion's Crippled Children's 
and sight conservation 
program. Tickets are four 
dollars for adults and one 
dollar for students. 

From last year's squad the 
Demons are returning three 
starters. This year's squad has 
four seniors. Yates feels that 
these seniors are providing the 
team with tremendous 
leadership. This years Demon 
roundballers have alot more 
depth than the Demon team of 



last year. Yates is expecting a 
lot more of a press and change 
in defenses this year with the 
depth. Yates has this to say 
about this year's squad, 'I'm 
not sure our starting five will 
by as good as last year's, but 
on the other hand, our top ten 
players will be deeper. We 
have more depth and we will 
have good flexability with the 
people we have playing in- 
side.' 

The Demons however will 
have to be ready at the start of 
the season as their first home 
game is December 1 against 
defending league champion 
Arkansas-Little Rock. After 
that tough opener the Demons 
will then have to play always 
tough Houston Baptist. Let's 
everybody come out next 
Thursday night and support 
Coach Wayne Yates and the 
Demon roundballers. 



Dwain Roark, Nor- 
thwestern's assistant 
basketball coach for the past 
two years, has resigned to 
accept a similar position at 
North Texas State Universtiy 
in Denton, TX. 

At North Texas, State, 
Roark will serve as an assistant 
under Coach Billy Blakely and 
will be in charge of recruiting 
for the Mean Green, who will 
be competing in the Southland 
Conference basketball race for 
the first time this season. 

While at Northwestern the 
pat two years, Roark has been 
in charge of recruiting and 
recruited most of the players 
on the current Demon squad. 
The Demons have posted a 30- 
26 record in the past two years 
under head coach Wayne 
Yates and Roark, including a 
19-9 record last season. 

"We certainly hate to see 
Dwain leave," said Yates. 
"He has been a big reason for 
the success we have enjoyed in 
the past two seasons and he 
will be missed. Dwain did an 
outstanding job for us in the 
two years he was here." 



Roark came to Nor- 
thwestern to start the 1980 
school year, after serving as 
the head coach at Arkansas 



College for two years. In each 
season at Arkansas College 
Roark guided his team into the 
NAIA national playoffs. 

"I'm looking forward to the 
new position," stated Roark. 
"But at the same time I will 
miss not coaching the players I 
recruited for Northwestern. 
Hopefully at North Texas I 
will be able to recruit the same 
type of players we were able to 
get at Northwestern. I think I 
can do that because the 
philosophy of Coach Blakely 
is very much like that of 
Coach Yates." 

"The success in recruiting 
that I had at Northwestern is 
due to the help and support of 
Coach Yates," added Roark. 
"I was able to be in total 
control of recruiting and at the 



Demons Demolish Nicholls 
State Colonels 38-6 



Northwestern insured itself 
of a winning season Saturday 
night by whipping the Nicholls 
State Colonels, 38-6. The 
Demons played before a very 
disappointing crowd of 4,500 
fans. 

Wide receiver Victor Oatis 
lead the Demons on the night 
with eight catches for 198 
yards and two touchdowns. 
V.O.'s 198 yards receiving 
broke the single game 
receiving record of Dick 
Reding set back in 1966 
against South-eastern. Reding 
on that night had six catches 
for 187 yards. 

Senior quarterback Bobby 
Herbert got his second start of 
the season and completed 10 
of 15 passes for 195 yards and 
two touchdowns. Stan Powell 
also threw for 105 yards on 
eight attempts and six com- 
pletions. 

Nicholls State's defense 
came into the game ranked 
number one against the rush in 
1-AA allowing only 63.1 yards 
per game. At halftime, 
however: the Demons already 
had 70 yards rushing. On that 
night Northwestern rushed for 
a total of 129 yards. Tony 
Green lead all rushers with 64 



yards on 16 carries and one 
touchdown. The Demons had 
a total offense of 444 yards, 
while the Demon defense 
allowed Nicholls State only to 
total 151 yards. Other 
Demons to score on the 



Nicholls Head Coach Sonny 
Jackson said about the 
Demons victory, 'Nor- 
thwestern State simply gave us 
a good whipping tonight. 
They just wanted the game 
more than we did.' Nor- 



evening were Leroy Ellis with . thwestern quarterback Bobby 
one touchdown, Roy Fontenot 



with a five yard touchdown 
pass and Dale Quickel had five 
extra points and one field 
goal. 

Nicholls State record now 
falls to 6-3, while Nor- 
thwestern 's record also goes to 
6-3, with now a possible 
chance to go the Division 1- 
AA playoffs. Also the 
Colonels were ranked number 
10 in the nation in division 1- 
A A. 



Hebert said, 'Louisiana Tech 
is the rival game up here in 
Natchitoches and a lot of 
importance is placed on the 
game. But I'm from the same 
area as Nicholls and for me 
this was the big rival same- 
this one meant the most to me 
personally.' The Demons will 
now get ready for the 
Southeastern Lions. 



BEOG CHECKS 

ARE READY IN THE CASHIER'S OF- 
FICE, SECOND FLOOR ROY HALL 
THEY'VE BEEN THERE FOR A WHILE, 
COME BY AND PICK YOURS UP. 



same time Coach Yates was 
always very helpful and easy 
to work with." 

At North Texas Roark will 
be assisting with a team that 
posted a 15-12 overall mark 
last season as an independent. 
"Dwain is an excellent 
recruiter," said Blakely, who 
is heading into his eighth 
season at North Texas. "We 
feel he can really help us in 
that area. His recruiting 
certainly has played a big part 
in the success Northwestern 
has enjoyed in the past two 
years." 

Roark received both his 
bachelor's and master's 
degrees from Ouachita Baptist 
University and is a native of 
Jena, La. 




Read 



The 



SAUCE 



Phi Mu 

Dance 



At The Homeplate 
$1.00 In Advance 
$1.50 At The Door 
Sponsored By Budweiser 
Door Prizes Will Be 
Given. All Proceeds 
Are Donated To 
Project H.O.P.E. 



Thursday, November 11 
9:00 p.m. Until 



Advising for P.E. Majors 

Advisement for Advanced registration for the Spring 
Semester for Physical Education Majors (including 
Pre-Physical Therapy) will be held in the PE Majors 
Building Thursday, November 11, 1982, 8:00 A.M- 
9:15 A.M. and Tuesday, November 16, 8:00 A.M.-9:15 
A.M. If you have a class at these times make an 
appointment with your Advisor. 



Intramural Flag Football Playoffs h™™'™^™**™*-**" 

• 7 Men's Greek 



1, and 15-4. The TKii's first 
team took an easy victory over 
Sig Tau's second team by a 
score of 15-4, 15-2. Men's 3-V 
opened their season with a win 
over 10 Blind Boys 15-10, 15- 
6. Snawvers eased by E'Raps 
in their season opener by a 
count of 15-8, 15-1. 

Delta Psi Kappa handed 
Tri-Sig their second con- 
secutive loss with a 15-8, 15-4 
victory. Women's 3-V used 
consecutive scores of 15-9 to 
grab their second straight win, 
this one coming over 
UnKappa 5th's number one 
team. AKA forfeited their 
match with Phi Mu. 

The TKE's second team 
came away with a 15-8, 12-15, 
15-5 victory over the Sig Dog's 
number two team. The TKE's 
first team also won, as they 
beat Sig Tau's number one 
team 15-13, 15-6. The Sig 
Dog's first team improved 
their record to 2-0 with a 
strong team effort when they 
defeated Phi Beta Sigma 15- 
10, 15-5. 

YANG Two handed the 
Kingpins a loss with scores of 
15-13, and 15-8. Los Amigos 
destroyed G.D.I. Omen 
Wednesday, when they reeled 
off wins of 15-1, 15-4. It took 
the Jocks three games to finish 
off E'Raps, who fell to 0-2. 
The Jocks improved their 
record to 2-0 as they defeated 
E'Raps 15-1, 12-15, 15-4. 

On Thursday, Odyssey 
forfeited once again, this time 
to VIP's first team. Sigma 
Kappa came back after losing 
the first game, 14-15, to beat 
Delta Zeta 15-6, and 15-7 for 
the victory. VIP's second 
team disbanded after for- 
feiting for the second time in 
as many games. 

YANG One needed only 
four men to defea E'Raps' 
second team, and that's all 
they got as they handed the 
second team their second 
consecutive loss 15-11, 14-16, 
15-6. Men's 3-V took a two- 
games-to-one victory over 
Snawvers by scores of 15-8, 9- 
15, and 15-3. The Kingpins 
Picked up their first win due to 
another forfeit by 
Brotherhood. 



STEELERS 
E'RAPS ■ 



Men's Independent 



1 



JOCKS 
KINGPINS 



CONINE 
ZOOM 



YANG no. 2 
YANG no. 1 



KAPPA SIG no. 1 
KAPPA SIG no.2 



KAPPA ALPHA 
THETA CHI 



Women's Division 



UN KAPPA 5th No.2 
TRI-SIGMA 



UN KAPPA 5th No. 1 
VIP's 




Dear Students: 

Below are the new standards for "good standing and 
satisfactory progress" effective Fall 1982 for continued receipt 
of financial assistance at NSU. 

A student must have an overall 2.00 GPA in the four major 
subjects (English, Math, Social Science, and Social Studies) in 
order to be in "Good Academic Standing" to qualify for financial 
assistance as a Freshman. To continue receiving financial 
assistance a student must make satifactory acsademic 
progress. This calls for a student to maintain a 1.50 GPA the 
first year in college. The second year a student must maintain a 
1.75 GPA. After the second year the student must maintain a 
2.00 GPA to continue receiving financial assistance. If a 
student fails to maintain the required GPA (in order to continue 
receiving financial assistance), he or she will not receive 
financial assistance for the following semester. The student 
must make a 2.00 GPA and enroll in the same number of hours 
as the previous semester in order to make satisfactory progress 
and receive financial assistance the following semester. 
Transfer Students 

Transfer students are required to comply with the 3bove 
standards of satisfactory progress in order to receive financial 
assistance at NSU. 

Time Limits on Financial Aid Eligibility 

A student may receive financial aid for a maximum of five years 

(10 semesters) in order to complete a four year degree program. 



Demon wide receiver Victor Oatis hauls in another 
long pass in a game played against Alcorn St. For the 
year, Oatis is the Demons leading receiver. Last week 
against Nicholls St., Oatis hauled in eight passes for 
197 yards and two touchdowns, including bombs of 
73 and 43 yards. 



What Goes Better With 
Turkey and Dressing Than 
Some Sauce 




From the 
Registrar's Office... 

1. The repeat rule is effective starting in the spnnq semester. 
This rule means that the second grade will count as the final 
grade On your transcript, a line will be typed thi ought he 
course .that has been repeated and a "R" will be placed in the 
left margin by the course. 

2. If a student fails to satisfactorily complete a developmental 
course in 3 attempts, the student will be permanently 
suspended from NSU. (Reading 98 99 1 00; Math 1 00. Fnqlish) 

3 When a Freshman or Sophomore receives excessive 
unexcused absences (10% of total classes) the instructor may 
recommend to the student's academic dean that the student be 
withdrawn Irpm the rolls of that class and given the appropriate 
grade. (10% of MWF classes 5 days absent, and 10% of T TFi 
classes is 3 days absent) 

Read The SAUCE for info on Pre-Registration. 



Vote Wednesday 



Curren t Sauce, Page 12, November9 i J982_ 



Porker Picker Panel 



This 

Week's 

Games 



NSU 

vs 
SLU 



Miss St. 
vs 
LSI! 



Ariz. Si. 

vs 

Washington 



Kentucky 

vs 
Florida 



Tennesse 

vs 

Ole Miss 



Northwestern 

vs 

Ohio St. 



Nortre Dame 

vs 

Penn St. 



Oklahoma 

vs 

Missouri 



UCLA 

vs 

Stanford 





Roger 

Reynolds 



35-7 



LSU 
21-7 



Arizona St. 
28-14 



Florida 

35-7 



Tennessee 
24-10 



Ohio St. 
28-14 



Penn St. 
21-17 



Oklahoma 
35-10 



UCLA 
35-28 



Claremont Mudd 

vs 

La Verne 



Season 
Record 



Mudd 

28-3 



52-28 
.650 



John 

Cunningham 



NSU 
27-21 



LSU 
24-14 



Washington 
21-17 



Florida 
27-10 



Tennessee 
21-14 



Ohio St. 
35-10 



Notre Dame 
28-17 



Oklahoma 
21-14 



UCLA 
27-24 



Mudd 
31-20 



51-29 
.638 




Alison 

Breazeale 



INSU 
28-7 



LSU 
35-28 



Washington 
28-21 



Florida 
27-20 



Tennessee 
35-0 



Ohio St. 
56-12 



Notre Dame 
35-31 



Oklahoma 
42-35 



UCLA 
28-14 



Mudd 
17-7 



49-31 
.613 




Joe 
Cunningham 



NSU 
35-10 



LSU 
20-7 



Washington 
21-17 



Florida 
41-14 



Tennessee 
28-7 



Ohio St. 
31-10 



Notre Dame 
17-16 



Oklahoma 
21-14 



UCLA 
31-30 



Mudd 
34-10 



54-26 
.675 



til f^S^ 

Hp 



Dean 
Napoli 



NSU 
35-21 



LSU 
31-24 



Vashington 
17-14 



Florida 
35-10 



Tennessee 
21-7 



Ohio St. 
42-14 



Notre Dame 
21-17 



Oklahoma 
14-10 



Stanford 
14-10 



Mudd 

3-2 



53-27 
.663 




Dr. Joe 
Orze 



NSU 
31-20 



LSU 
24-7 



Washington 
30-20 



Florida 
35-17 



Tennessee 
20-14 



Ohio St. 
52-12 



Notre Dame 
21-14 



Oklahoma 
42-30 



UCLA 
24-20 



Mudd 
7-6 



51-29 
.638 




Jim 
Oliver 



NSU 
31-14 



LSU 
35-7 



Arizona St. 
17-14 



Florida 
21-3 



Tennessee 
17-7 



Ohio St. 
31-0 



Penn St. 
21-14 



Oklahoma 
28-6 



UCLA 
42-35 



LaVerne 
33-18 



46-34 
.575 



Demon Booster Club Seeks Revenge Against Lady Demons 



Seeking revenge for the loss 
of a year ago, the Demon 
Booster Club Bombers will 
take on the Lady Demons 
tonight (Tuesday). Game time 
is 7:30 p.m. in NSU's Prather 
Coliseum. 

There will be no admission 
charged for the contest, 
although donations will be 
taken during the contest to 
help cut the cost of the Lady 
Demon trip to Reno, Nevada 
in January. 

In the first annual pre- 
season scrimmage between the 
two units last year, the Lady 
Demons won handily. That 
setback did not sit to well with 
some of the booster club 
members, who vowed the 
outcome would be different 
this time around. 

Mayor Joe Sampite will 
again act as the head coach of 
the booster club team. Squad 



members include Raymond 
Arhur, Wayne McCollun, 
George Younger, Lee Posey, 
Joe Peck Payne, Tom An- 
selmi, Ed Breedlove, Gary 
DeBlieux, Layne Miller, Terry 
Downs, Mike Henry, Booster 
Club President Steve Wiggins 
and several others. 

The Lady Demons have 
been improving each week and 
earlier this week played well in 
a scrimmage against a junior 
college team. "I thought we 
showed a big improvement," 
said Lady Demon Coach Pat 
Pierson of the progress her 
team is making. "We are 
shooting the ball better and 
our freshmen girls just look 
better everyday they are 
here." 

Pierson is also pleased with 
the improvement shown by 
veteran center Tracy Taylor, 
who missed much of the pre- 



season because of having her 
tonsils removed. "Tracy is 
shooting better and is getting 
into shape," added Pierson. 
"It's nice to have her back in 
the line-up." 

When asked if the contest 
against the booster club could 
help her team, Pierson replied, 
"Yes, financially." 

"We know it will be a 
tougher game than it was last 
season," added Pierson, 
somewhat more seriously. 
"We have been working on 
our defense because we know 
what an offensive minded 
team we will be playing." 

"Really, I think it will be 
good for us," continued 
Pierson, getting more serious 
with each comment. "It will 
be good for us to play against 
a physical team. The guys we 
are playing against are mostly 
former athletes and thev will 



be competitive. Our squad 
knows we can not take it 
lightly." 

The Lady Demons will open 
the regular season November 
27 when they host McNeese 
State. 



The Current Sauce is now 
accepting stories, pictures, and 
ideas for the Lampoon edition 
of the Sauce, which will be 
printed sometime near the end 
of March or early April. 
Stories need to be typed and 
may be left unsigned. 
However, stories must be done 
in semi-good taste andd can 
not be construed as libelous. 
If you sign your name to the 
story, please specify whether 
or not you would like your 
name on the story in the 
paper. 



Oliver Files Suit 
Against P.P. Panel 



Diamond Jim Oliver filed a 
1.6 million dollar defamatiq 
suit against the Porker Picker 
panel Thursday alter reading 
remarks in the Current Sauce 
that he felt to be slanderous 
and offensive. Named as co- 
defendents in the suit were 
Sports Editor Roger Reynolds, 
Sauce editor Joe Cunningham, 
advisor Frank Presson, NSU 
President Dr. Joe Orze, 
Oliver's roommate and ex- 
guest selector Dean Napoli, 
and Demon baseball coach 
Herbie Smith. 

Oliver felt that the 
nickname given to him in the 
paper, "Diamond Jim 'Please 
coach can I play now' Oliver," 
and the remark, "Diamond 
Jim lists as his greatest ac- 
complishment that warm 
spring day last April when he 
fouled off three consectutive 
pitches in a meaningless intra- 
squad baseball scrimmage," 
and "this year 'O' hopes to 
have a batting average" were 
slanderous and generally not 
totally correct. 

In his suit, Oliver said thai 
the article should have read, " 
'O' lists as his most 
memorable moment the af- 
ternoon that he fouled ofl 
four consectutive pitches and 
then walked in his next at bat 
during a meaningless 
scrimmage with the Nat- 
chitoches-Central High School 
baseball team. 

Following up on his 
prediction of a week ago, 
Porker Picker Rookie, John 
Cunningham rolled to an 8-2 
record en route to his second 
finest week as a P.P. panel 
regular and vaulted in' 
fourth place in the thickening 
race for the Highman Trophy, 
the symbol of foot ball 
forecasting excellence. 

Also hilling on eight of 10 
tries for the week was guest 
panelist Barbi "I finallly gP' 
to pick" Hall, and Joe "I IT 
to keep away from trouble but 
trouble just finds me 
Cunningham who moved one 
game up on first place. 

Faltering last week were 
panel regulars Roger "See you 
in the Super Bowl" Reynolds 
and Alison "My luck ran out 
Breazeale who sported 6-4 
records as did Donna Jo Kelly 
and Diamond Jim "Ya'll wen 1 
crazy last week, man" Oliver- 
In related news, the Vatican 
announced loday that it was 
bestowing its highest civilian 
award on Barbi Hall and John 
and Joe Cunningham for their 
unselfish devotion to Notre 
Dame. The trio, in face oj 
insurmountable odds, picked 
the fighting Irish to defeat the 
Number One ranked P' lt ' 
sburgh Panthers Saturday and 
the Irish did. 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX No. 14 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




December 7, 1982 



DWI Rules Getting Tougher 



Northwestern Gifted and 
^ .oot Talented School : One Of 

Legislature Passes Stiff Laws Three Test centers 



Five bills dealing with drunk 
driving that were presented to 
the legislature by Governor 
Dave Treen, were passed this 
past session and will take 
effect January 1, 1983. 
Products of the special drunk 
driving task force appointed 
by Treen in resnonse to public 



pressure from such groups as 
Mothers Against Drunk 
Driving, the new drunk 
driving laws are designed to 
provide for stricter and more 
uniform sentencing for the 
offense. 

The most noteworthy 
change in the new DWI 




The Black Knights precision drill team of Nor 
Jhwestern State University performed recently for 
Brig. Gen. CaryB. Hutchinson Jr., who was at NSU 
to review the Reserve Officers Training Corps and 
military science programs. Hutchinson is com- 
manding general of the U.S. Army Third ROTC 
Region, which is headquartered at Fort Riley, Kan. 



regulations is an automatic 60- 
day drivers license suspension 
for first time DWI con- 
victions. Accompanyng this is 
a fine of not less than $125 and 
either two days in jail or four 
days working on a community 
project. The offenders will 
also be required to complete 
substance abuse and drive 
improvement programs. 

Some other provisions in 
effect January 1 will be: 

-For second offense, the jail 
fine will be not less than $300 
no more than $500, a 
minimum of 15 days in jail or 
a minimum of 30 days of 
court-approved, community 
service work and participation 
in substance abuse and driver 
improvement courses. 

-Jail terms will be at least 
one year but no more than five 
years, fines no more than 
$1,000. At least six months of 
the sentence must be served 
without probation, parole, or 
suspension of sentence. 

Penalties for driving under 
suspension or revocation or 
license will not be less than 
$300 and a minimum of one 
week on jail and up to six 
months. 

-A requirement that car 
owners be notified if a person 
is convicted of a DWI offense 
commited while driving the 
owner's car. 



Electrical Failure Causes Mass Exodus 



A failure in the electrical 
back-up systems late last 
month cause the residents of 
Varnado Hall to be moved to 
other dorms. 

According to Coordinator 
of Housing, Micki Townsend, 
a power failure on November 
18 prompted the discovery 
that the major electrical cable 
leading to Varnado "had 
burned out-broken. After a 
while things just deteriorate," 
she said. Repairmen did not 
have the splicing kit to fix the 
cable, so they ordered it. In 
the meantime, the backup 
system that was being used 
failed. It was in worse shape 
than the original one." 

The repair kit "had to come 



from Nashville, Tennessee" 
and at the earliest, repair 
could not have been expected 
before Tuesday, November 
23. " So, we had no other 
decision to make but to move 
the students somewhere else. 
Fortunately, we had a place to 
move them to." Female 
residents were put in a spare 
wing of Sabine Hall, with male 
residents going to a spare wing 
in Rapides. 

"After the first initial 
grumbling from the students, 
they reacted very well," 
remarked Townsend. "It's 
only normal to complain a 
little'.' 

Rainstorms delayed the 
repair process on Tuesday, but 



repair began the next day and 
was completed by that night. 

Students returning from the 
Thanksgiving vacation were 
able to move back into 
Varnado. 

NSU Joins 
SBA Consortium 

Northwestern has joined a 
consortium of public and 
private universities forming a 
statewide Small Business 
Development Center program 
to provide management and 
technical assistance to the 
small business communities in 
Louisiana. 

(Continued on page 2) 



The new Louisiana School 
for Math, Science and the Arts 
located on the NSU campus 
has been selected as one of 
only three testing centers 
nationwide to utilize and 
evaluate computer software 
provided by Science Research 
Associates, Inc., of Chicago. 

John E. Guth, Jr., president 
of Science Research 
Associates, said the Louisiana 
School and institutions in 
Chicago and Omaha, Neb., 
have been requested to serve as 
testing centers for the com- 
puter materials that will cover 
several areas of academic 
specialization. 

SRA, a subsidiary of IBM, 
will provide computer soft- 
ware without charge to the 
Louisiana School and in- 
stitutions in Chicago and 
Omaha, Neb., have been 
requested to serve as testing 
centers for the computer 
materials that will cover 
several areas of academic 
specialization. 

SKA, a subsidiary of IBM, 
will provide computer soft- 
ware without charge to the 
Louisiana School, which will 
open next fall on the North- 
western State University 
campus. In its first year, the 
school will serve 200 high 
school juniors from 
throughout the state. 

Louisiana School director 
Dr. Robert Alost said students 
and faculty members at the 
new institution will "utilize ad 
critique the computer 
materials, which Science 
Research Associates plans to 
develop for nationwide use." 

Alost said computer 
materials in the areas of 
mathematics, science, social 
studies, English, art, music 
and other academic fields 
"will be invaluable to the 
Louisiana School, because our 
plans call for a heavy con- 
centration and emphasis in the 
utilization of computers." 

He added, "We consider it a 
significant recognition of the 
goals and purposes of the 
Louisiana School to have been 
selected as one of only three 
testing centers across the 
United States for the comDuter 



software. The program is also 
of great financial benefit to 
the school, because computer 
packages cost form $3,000 to 
$4,000 for ecah academic- 
area. " 

Following the enrollment of 
the first class of 200 juniors in 
1983, an additional 200 
juniors will be admitted to the 
school the following year. 
Class sizes will be increased to 
350 in 1985, giving the 
Louisiana School an 
enrollment of 700 juniors and 
seniors by the 1986 school 
vear. 



SUGB Opens 
New Positions 



The Student Union 
Governing Board announced 
the opening of the Public 
Relations and Advertising 
Chairman position at their 
meeting Monday on 
November 28. This committee 
handles all of the advertising 
for the Board's events plus 
arranges displays and 
promotional material to 
publicize the SUGB. Since 
this is one of the Board's most 
important committees, the 
SUGB would like to encourage 
anyone who has served on a 
committee and would like to 
become more involved to run 
for this office. This opening is 
not only an excellent op- 
portunity to further your 
leadership abilities but also 
offers the opportunity to 
promote the Union Board and 
its events so that all students 
are aware of them. Anyone 
interested may come by room 
214 of the Student Union and 
fill out an application. The 
election will be after the 
holidays so get those ap 
plications in before you go 
home! 

Other business during the 
meeting was the passing of the 
spring film package. These 
movies include: Mad Max, 
Road Warriors, World Ac- 
cording to Garp, Night Shift, 
Phycho, Hollywood Knights, 
Time was Time, Stir Crazy, 
Altered States, Heavy Metal- 
and two video program-Conan 
the Barbarian, and Stripes. 



Current Sauce, Tuesday, December 7, 1982, Page 2 



NSU-SBA con't 

(Continued from page 1) 

Dr. Eugene Williams, head 
of NSU's Business Ad 
ministration and Economics 
Department, said the con- 
sortium was established this 
fall following last year's 
successful Small Business 
Development Center "pilot 
project conducted by .North- 
[ east Louisiana University in- 
Monroe. 

Williams said the con- 
sortium's proposal for 1982-83 
funding by the Small Business 
Administration will be sent to 
Washington, D.C., for 
consideration in December. 
Matching, non-federal funds 
will be provided, stated the 
NSU professor. 

As part of the statewide 
program, a Small Business 
Development Center will be 
established at NSU and 11 
other public universities and 
six private institutions. 

"The center to be located at 
Northwestern will provide a 
convenient, simple-to-reach 
place for small business 
owners to obtain information 
on the 15 to 20 federal 
agencies whose services they 
might use," explained 
Williams. 

According to Williams, 
Northeast will be the "lead 
university" and "coordinating 
unit" for the consortium, 
which already has more than 
,$800,000 committed to the 
i statewide program by the 
[participating universities. 



Collegiate Radio Finally In The Spotlight 



The next time you turn on 
your radio and hear the 
professional voice of your 
favorite disc jockey the odds 
are he or she began their 
announcing career at a college 
radio station. Finally, within 
the last year, collegiate radio 
stations are receiving the 
attention that is long overdue. 
Major markets and radio 
companies are realizing that 
the future of professional 
radio is in college radio. 

Because of the large amount 
of mass communication 
majors in the United States, 




experience will be a definite 
key for those trying to find a 
job after graduation. Eric 
Maron of KNWDatNorth- 
western commented, 
"College radio gives people 
the chance to learn the 
business and make mistakes." 
Furthermore, the type of music 
played by college stations 
varies and the disc jockeys are 
exposed to various types of 
music. The college format 
also gives announcers the 
chance to give airplay to 
unknown artists. 
In a recent article by 



t 



"BILLBOARD" Denis 
McNamara, program director 
of WLIR - FM in Garden City, 
urged collegiate disc jockeys 
to be creative and keep ahead 
in their pursuit for a 
professional broadcasting 
career. 

Keeping a step ahead and 
being different will give a disc 
jockey a style and personality 
all his own. This is extremely 
important in the radio starting 
place for the person who 
aspires to a career in radio 
broadcasting. 




People 
Power 



helps 
prevent 
birth 
defects 

Support 
March of Dimes 



University 
Bookstore 

r^ojme For Holidays 




NSU Sponsors 
Indian Crafts 

The annual Indian Crafts Day, 
sponsored by NSU's An- 
thropology Club was held in 
the Williamson Museum, 
Saturday. The public was 
invited to watch several 
Louisiana Indian Tribes 
demonstrate their crafts and 
also were able to buy some 
crafts. 



20 % oft 

Jackets, Sweaters 
Sweatshirts, Tee's 




I 

I 
•m 

I 
I 
v 



I 

I 
I 
I 



NEW STANDARDS FOR GOOD 
STANDING AND SATISFACTORY 
PROGRESS 

A student must have an overall 2.00 
GPA in the four major subjects in 
order to be in "GOOD ACADEMIC 
STADING" to qualify for financial 
assistance as a Freshman. To continue 
receiving finacial assistance a student 
must make satisfactory academic 
progress. This means a student must 
keep a 1.5 GPA the first year in 
college. The second year he must 
I maintain a 1.75 GPA. After the 
second year he must maintan a 2.00 
GPA. If a student fails to maintain 
the required GPA, he or she will not 
receive financial assistance the 
following semester. The student must 
make a 2.00 GPA and enroll in the 
same number of hours as the previous 
semester in order to make satisfactory 
progress and receive the financial 
' assistance the following semester. 
| TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Transfer students are required to 
comply with the above standards of 
satisfactory progress in order to 
receive financial assistance at NSU. 
TIME LIMITS ON FINANCIAL 
AID ELIGIBILITY 
A student may receive financial aid for 
a maximum of five years in order to 
complete a four year degree program. ' 



CA$H FOR 
YOUR BOOK$!!! 

Dec. 1 3-1 7 ONLY 
9:00-4:00 

University Bookstore 

IIIIMIIMinilUIHIMiriJiHHJi HltJItHH INIMHiHIIIIHIUIJIHHIUIUmiill lHininillJINitllitlllH 




NURSE INTERNSHIP 
PROGRAM 

Senior BSN Students 

Consider the Opportunity to fulfill 
your own professional interests: 

* Commissioned as an Air Force Officer 
*30 Days Vacation with Pay 

* Excellent Salary 

* Specialized & Advanced Programs 

Major Linda McFarland 
Call Today For Information: TSGT Gary Norton 

2621 Ave. E. East, Suite 21 7 
~VJl Arlington, Texas 7601 1 

(817) 461-1946 (COLLECT) 



A greet way of life. 




Organizations 

^5 c 



Current Sauce, Tuesday, December 7, 1982, 




Tri-Sigma 

The Alpha Zeta chapter of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma is pleased 
to announce her new officers 
for the 1983 term. Our new 
President is Stacie Lafitte, our 
new Vice President is Laurie 
Weaver, and as Treasurer is 
Beth McMillian, Secretary is 
Amanda Arledge, our 
Education Director is Sonya 
Tevis and our new Rush 
Director is Cappy 
Prudhomme. We art looking 
forward to another great year 
and these traffic sigmas will 
make it happen! 

This past week Tri Sigma 
visited the Lee School for 
Children and spent an in- 
teresting afternoon reading 
Christmas stories to the 
children. In the theme of 
Sigmasserving children it was 
really fun sharig the joys of 
Christmas with the children. 

Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa has been busy 
since returning from the 
Thanksgiving holidays. We 
started off the last three weeks 
of school with a gumbo supper 
on Tuesday, November 30. 
Thanks to Judi Abrusley for a 
job well done in planning the 
supper. It was a great success. 

New officers for 1983 were 
elected last week. They are: 
Janice Duggan-president, 
Brenda Foster-lst vice- 
president, Gina Rousseaux- 
vice-president of Pledge 
Education, Debbie Gardner- 
■"ice-president of Membership, 
^nn Fleming-Secretary, and 
June Humphrey-treasurer. 



Phi Eta Sigma 

Phi Eta Sigma is a national 
college scholastic honor 
society for freshmen. A 
member of the Association of 
College Honor Societies, it 
was founded at the Univesity 
of Illinois March 22, 1923. Its 
goal is to encourage and 
reward high scholastic at- 
tainment among freshmen in 
institutions of higher learning. 
There are approximately 180 
chapters throughout the 
United States, and some 
300,000 members. 

All freshman men are 
eligible to join who have a 
cumulative grade-point 
average of 3.5 or better at the 
close of any curricular period 
during their first year. This 
year's officers are: President- 
Joe Stamey; Vice President- 
Lytton Allen; Treasurer-Mike 
Miguez ; Secretary-James 
Brosset; and Senior Advisor- 
DavidHough. 

Periaktoi 

The NSU Periaktoi Club 
met for a special meeting 
November 16, for the purpose 
of completing projects 
schedule for the holidays. 

The Christmas basket 
community project has been 
very successful, thanks to 
Periaktoi members and the 
Natchitoches business 
community. 

Periaktoi members reported 
that the "come as you are, but 
with fair" party was quite a 
success. Prizes for best 
costumes went to Bonnie 
House and Gary Thomas. 



Delta Sigma Theta 

The Iota Mu Chapter of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 
Inc. held its third formal 
meeting on Sunday, 
November 14. Service 
Projects and chapter com- 
mittees were among the topics 
discussed. 

Iota Mu Chapter sponsored 
a successful Health Fair on 
Saturday, November 20 at the 
North Street Community Day 
Care Center. Exhibits in- 
cluded a smoking machine and 
display on lung diseases and 
an ambulance from the 
Natchitoches Parish Am- 
bulance Sevice. Blood 
pressures were also taken. 
This was the chapter's service 
project for November. The 
admission was free. 

PRSSA 

The NSU Chapter of 
PRSSA held its meeting on 
Nov. 11 at 6:00 in Room 213, 
Keyser Hall. 

At this meeting, scholar- 
ships were discussed as well as 
the duties and responsibilities 
of the new club officers. We 
also held our window wash, 
which was held at Shamrock's 
on Nov. 13. This was a huge 
success and we wish to thank 
the employees at Shamrock's 
for their help. 

PRSSA would also like to 
congratulate our advisor, Mr. 
Frank Presson on his recent 
appointment to the PRSSA 
National Nominating 
Committee. 



Panhellenic 

The NSU Panhellenic held a 
meeting December 1 at 4 p.m. 
At this meeting, the officers 
for 1982-83 were announced. 
They are President, Brenda 
Weinbarg, Phi Mu; Vice 
President, Gayla Phillips, 
Sigma Kappa; Secretary, 
Danita Nolan, Sigma Sigma 
Sigma; and Treasurer, 
Christine Avant, Delta Zeta. 

TKE 

The TKE's closed out the 
fall semester 1 in accordance to 
our 'Winning Tradition' 
theme. TKE no. 1 took the 
greek championship in in- 
tramural volleyball and we ' 
also won the 2 on 2 
basketball tournament. 

Our Christmas party was on 
Friday December 3. The 
brotherswould like to thank all 
of our little sisters who did 
such an outstanding job with 
the party. 

We are planning many 
events for the spring semester 
including a fund raiser for our 
philanthropy St. Judes 
Children's Hospital. 

Kappa Sigma 

Congratulations to the 
renowned Joseph Bath Stamey 
for being selected National 
Kappa Sigma Active of the 
year which includes a two 
thousand dollar scholarship. 
Joe was selected from among 
thousands of Kappa Sigmas 
across the nation and we are 
proud to be associated with 
him. "Way to go Joe!" 



Delta Zeta 

The Epsilon Beta Chapter 
of Delta Zeta has had quite a 
lot going on. The chapter had 
an initiation Sunday 
November 21. Initiated were 
Tracy Bedell, Denise Chance 
and Jacklyn Connell. The 
chapter would like to extend 
them in the warmest of 
welcomes. After the 
initiation, the chapter .held a 
banquet with pledges and 
actives in attendance. 

At the banquet, pledge 
awards were given. The 
Scholarship award as well as 
the Rose award w hic/i went to 
newly initiated Denise Chance. 
The Best Little Sister award 
went to Tanna Colbert. 



NACUS 

The Northwestern 
Association for Children 
Under Six will hold its next 
meeting on December 1, 1982. 
There will be a workshop at 
\vhich Christmas toys, articles, 
and suggestions will be made 
in preparation for our 
December 8 trip to the Pre- 
school for the Handicapped 
here in Natchitoches. This 
even will be a source of en- 
tertainment for the children 
and your participation is 
encouraged. The workshop is 
open to all who would like to 
attend and become future 
members of NACUS. 

(KE cont'd) 

Thanks to the Phi Mus for 
mother great exchange. 



PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL 
ARE AVAILABLE! 

The U.S. Air Force' is offering several hundred scholarships to those 
planning to go to medical school in 1 983. This Air Force scholarship 
will pay for full tuition, plus the cost of books, equipment, supplies, 
fees and laboratory expenses. You will also receive $556 per 
month. 

If you are planning to start medical/osteopathic school in 1 983, you 
should call now to investigate this outstanding opportunity to finance 
your medical education. 

Contact: 

Bill Dukes 
George Stephenson 
(81 7) 461 -1 946 (COLLECT) 
U.S. AIR FORCE MEDICAL RECRUITING OFFICE 
c-^-^, 2621 Avenue E. East, Suite No. 21 7 

^ /^^^^^^s^ Arlington, Texas 76011 



A great way of life 



IMPORTANT NEWS FROM 
FINANCIAL AID 

If you have been awarded Federal 
Financial Aid (Pell. BEOG Gram, 
'College Work Study, SEOG, NDSL, 
or SSIG) no action is necessary at the 
present time. Replacement Pell Grant 
Reports and ACT Need Analysis 
! reports have been requested for you 
land will be mailed to our office. 
[Replacement verification documents 
are not required for those students 
already receiving financial aid. 
I Students who have not been 
awarded a Pell Grant must contact the 
Pell Grant Office, P.O. Box 92440, 
Los Angeles, CA 90009 and request 
duplicate copies of their Pell Grant 
reports. You may also call 800-638- 
6700 and request the duplicated 
copies. Verification documents (if 
requested) by our office as soon as 
possible. Replacement ACT Need 
Analysis copies have been requested 
for all students and will be mailed to 
this office. 

Students will need to come by the 
Financial Aid Office and renew their 
aid for the Spring. If you renewed 
your aid before the fire, please come 
by and renew it again. If you do not 
plan to enroll for the Spring '83, 
please contact this office in order that 
we may award your financial aid 
package to someone else. 




Federal Gasoline Tax Not Bad Idea 



Pre-Registration Seems Good 



Pre-registration, the long awaited, often prayed for process of 
foresaking the long lines at the regular registration for shorter 
lines and fewer headaches of early registration, was a terrific 
success according to Dr. Austin Temple, NSU's Registrar. 

Dr. Temple says that possibly 90% of the people on this 
campus who are coming back in the spring went through pre- 
registration. Over 1900 students actually signed up for classes 
during the two-day procedure. 

The whole process was relatively short and sweet and com- 
pared to the absolute agony and drudgery of the regular 
enrollment process. It took little over an hour for most of the 
people to get in and out, and in some cases, it was just a matter 
of popping in, grabbing a couple of cards, and popping right 
back out. A far cry from the old way! 

Dr. Temple notes that if anyone made a mistake in signing up 
for a class, and took a class that they don't really need, and want 
to drop it and add something else more important, the resulting 
process is just as simple. 

When you come back in the spring, you need to pay your fees, 
and then bring your fee sheet by the regular registration. Show 
the fee sheet to the admitting people and they will let you in on 
the floor. You must also have a drop/add card signed by your 
advisor. Show the D-A card to the people at the desk where you 
want your class card and pickup a new class card. Then go to 
the department where you are going to drop a class and have 
them drop you from their roles. Remember this important 
thought: Have that drop card signed by all the right people. 

But back to pre-registration. It seemed like it went over 
extremely well. It was relatively short and sweet, and definitely 
to the point. I think that Dr. Temple and his staff, as well as Dr. 
Orze and all the teachers who made it to the pre-registration and . 
handed out our cards should be thanked. The SGA also 
deserves a note of credit. 

It just goes to show you how much good can come out of a 
little cooperation. 

Support Those Basketball Players 

This is just a short note to urge each and every one of you to 
go out and support those Demons and Lady Demons this year 
on the basketball floor. 

Both come into the season with high hopes and great ex- 
pectations, and it would be a shame if we weren't right out there 
behind them supporting them all the way. 

The Demons of Coach Wayne Yates are predicted to finish 
second in the Trans America Athletic Conference this year. The 
TAAC has always been a tough and competitive conference and 
every little bit of vocal support that we give our Demons helps 

The Ladies come into the season as one of the top teams in 
Louisiana, it not the South. Coaches Pat Pierson and James 
Smith have taught the Ladies well and we are definitely going to 
see some more winning basketball in the winter months to come 




By John L. Hess 

President Reagan's 
proposal of a five-cent in- 
crease in the federal gasoline 
tax is not a bad idea. Indeed,- 
President Carter should have 
had the vision and courage to 
propose a much larger tax 
years ago. 

Still, it raises 
— the issue of 
fairness. The 
tax would hit 
hardest those 
of moderate 
'income. And 
John Hess although the 
money would 
be earmarked 
for roads and transit, it would 
amount to only a patch against 
the need. 

There is hypocrisy here. 
The administration had 
slashed funds for tran- 
sportation; now it would 
restore them at the motorist's 
expense. At the same time, it 
suggested that the next cut in 
the income tax be moved up, 
from July to this January. 

Looming over every 
decision is the monstrous 
shortfall in the budget. On 
this, the president declared: 

"A propaganda campaign 
would have you believe these 
deficits . are caused by our so- 
called massive tax cut and 
defense buildup. Well, that's 
a real dipsy doodle because, 
even after our tax deductions 
are fully in place, they will 
barely neutralize the enormous 
payroll tax increases approved 
in 1977." 

The statement is 



breathtaking - a real dipsy 
doodle. There would have 
been no deficity at all so far in 
his administration if he had 
not cut taxes and raised 
military spending. But it is 
useful to remind us how the 
burden of taxation has shifted. 

It began long before this 
administration. We might 
date it with President Ken- 
nedy's program of investment 
credits, fast write-offs and 
income-tax cuts. Since then, 
lobbyists have cut many a new 
loophole and fashioned many 
a new tax shelter. 

As a result, the share of 
taxes paid by corporations and 
wealthy individuals had 
shrunk to a minor fraction by 
1980. Meanwhile, to finance 
Medicare and later to adjust 
Social Security pensions to 
inflation, Congress voted 
those enormous payroll tax 
increases Reagan mentioned. 

(It should be emphasized 
that up to now these two 
programs have never cost the 
Treasury a penny. They were 
paid for by those payroll 
taxes, and went directly into 
the economy - largely to the 
flourishing health-care in- 
dustry.) 

It is true that from time to 
time the Internal Revenue 
Service and some remorseful 
congressmen try to correct 
abuses. One effort deserves to 
be recalled as a classic of its 
kind. 

Last year, Sen. Bob Dole, 
R-Kan., proposed to curb high 
living on the expense account. 
The hotel and restaurant 



industry and its unions raised 
such a fuss that the "three- 
martini lunch" deduction was 
rescued. 

But to make up the loss of 
revenue, Congress inserted 
what amounted to a tax on the 
waiters' unreported tips. It 
was they who would pick up 
the tabs on those three-martini 
lunches... 

It has been observed in this 
column that there is no such 
thing as a fair tax, at least not 
to the person who pays it. The 
question to be asked is how 
effective it is. 

The Reaganauts came to 
Washington persuaded that 
taxes were strangling business. 
They promised that if these 
were sharply reduced on the 
upper brackets, capital would 
be freed for investment, the 
economy would take off, and 
lower tax rates would raise so 
much more money that the 
budget would be balanced. 

It didn't work. One reason, 
surely, is that taxes had not 
been discouraging investment. 

Then what has been 
discouraging investment? A 
shrinking market, reflecting 
the squeeze of taxes and in- 
flation upon the general 
public, and high interest rates, 
reflecting runaway federal 
deficits. 

President Reagan clings to. 
policies that would aggravate 
these conditions. The result is, 
as he said, in an unguarded 
moment, "a hell of a mess." 



Letter to The Editor 



Editor Advertising Manager 

Joe Cunningham Jr. Alison Breazeale 



Co-News Editor 
Barbi Hall 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Circulation Manager 
Dean Napoli 



Co- News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

' Sports Editor 
Roger Reynolds 

Asst. News Editor 
Diana Gratton 

Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Asst. Focus Editor 
Lesa Hatley 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Carre* Sauce it she official poMcaooa or 
Che undent body or NordHxttcra Slate 
Umrerstty <m Nucaiiocka.- Loeisiaaa The 
newspaper it catered at second datt ansrter at 
■he Natchitoches Pox Officer under the an of 
Marc* J, 117*. 
Carreni Sauce is pabtished every Tuesday 
1 in the fall and spring: amwster with 



(he exception of boUdayt and teniae, aeriods. 
aad I t i e i tg fr during the summer eraaoc It It 
pooled at the Nalcratochei Tiatej. Highway I 
South. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial aad business offices of (he Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts sad Sciences 
tad ftat . Telephone luMnoet is 157-3*5* 

Current Sauce subscriptions are t* yaarty. 
aad extend from the first summer issue 
throagh the final issue of the Sprint semester. 
Checks should be made parable M.QuraM 



Sauce, and should be mailed lo Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 714S7. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns an 
solely those of the writer aad do aot 
necessarily rep r e se nt the view p oi n t of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

- Letters to the editor are iovued. and con 
irrbutioiB are tohoted from students, faculty, 
staff, oe student body of North western. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
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letter lot journalistic style aad available space. 

Send postal form nuatrher 1579 lo Current 
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Dear Sir/Madam: 

The Foreign And Domestic 
Teachers Organization needs 
teacher applicants in all fields 
from Kindergarten through 
College to fill over five 
hundred teaching vacancies 
both at home and abroad. 

Since 1968, our organization 
has been finding vacancies and 
locating teachers both in 
foreign countries and in all 
fifty states. We possess 
hundreds of current openings 
and have all the information 
as to scholarships, grants, and 
fellowships. 

The principle problem with 
first year teachers is where to 
find the jobs! 

Our information and 
brochure is free and comes at 
an opportune time when there 
are more teachers than 
teaching positions. 

Should you wish additional 
information about our 
organization, you may write 
the Portland Oregon Better 
Business Bureau or the 
National Teacher's Placement 
Agency, UNIVERSAL 



TEACHERS, Box 5231, 
Portland, Oregon 97208. 

We do not promise every 
graduate in the field of 
education a definite position, 
however, we do promise to 
provide them with a wide 
range of hundreds of current 
vacancy notices both at home 
and abroad. 

Sincerely, 

John P. McAndrew, President 



Dear Editor, 

As an alumus and former 
band member of Northwestern 
State University, I would like 
to say that the Demon 
Marching Band has improved 
tremendously in their half- 
time performance. 

Their marching drill on 
November 6, 1982 was 
stimulating, interesting and 
held the attention of the 
spectators. 

At this time, I would like 
extend my congratulations to 
the director and marching 
band on a job well done. 

I am proud to say that I am 



an alumnus of Northwestern 
State University and the 
Demon Marching Band. 

Sincerely, 
(Miss) Pricilla Wolf 



Babies 
Don't Thrive 
in 

Smoke-filled 
Wombs 




When You're 

Pregnant, 
Do n't Smo ke! 

Support the 

March of Dimes 



dpMc 



BIRTH Off EOS FOUNDATION! 



a 




Lady Demons Down 
McNeese 78-77 



Lady Demon basketball 
Coach Pat Pierson would be 
the first to admit that it wasn't 
pretty, but still she was happy 
that her Lady Demons opened 
the 1982-83 season with a 78- 
77 win over McNeese State. 

"We made more than the 
expected first game mistakes," 
noted Pierson. "There were 
areas that were not good, but 
on the other hand for a first 
ball game we saw a number of 
things that were en- 
couraging." 

Most of what was en- 
couraging to Pierson and 
assistant Coach James Smith 
was the play of the freshmen, 



and the rally that saw the Lady 
Demons win after trailing by 
five points with just under 
four minutes left in the game. 

Freshman Lonnie Banks 
was the second leading scorer 
with 18 points and freshman 
point guard Teressa Thomas 
added 11 points. Freshman 
forward Val Williams added 
six points on three important 
offensive rebounds. 

The leading scorer for the 
Lady Demons was senior 
Stephanie Washington with 24 
points and the 5-8 forward 
also added eight rebounds to 
match the total of Banks and 
junior center Tracy Taylor. 



The Lady Demons shot just 
39 percent from the field and 
52.2 percent from the fret 
throw line (24 of 46) and that 
is one area that Pierson says 
her team will improve. "No 
doubt our shooting has to 
improve," said Pierson. "But 
I'm sure it will. A lotof it was 
nervousness of the first game 
The encouraging thing was 
that by running our offense we 
were able to get good shots. It 
wasn't that we were taking bad 
shots, we just were't hitting 
the good ones." 

The Lady Demons were also 
guilty of 30 turnovers, 
although that was eight less 
'than McNeese committed. 
"We expected turnovers 
because of our running 
game," admitted Pierson. 
"We know we will have some 
mistakes, but on the other 
hand we were happy with the 
number of mistakes that our 
defense caused." 

One concern for Pierson 
this season will be her teams 
lack of height, but the Lady 
Demons were only out 
rebounded by four against the 
much taller Cowgirls. "We 
still have to work on our 
rebounding," said Pierson. 
"But the strength of McNeese 
is the inside game and for the 
most part we stayed in there 
with them." 





THEQTRE/ 352-5109 570 F 



Mississippi State Rolls Over 
Demons 97- 



■59 



The Mississippi State 
Bulldogs handed the Demon 
roundballers their second loss 
of the year on Saturday night. 
The Bulldogs soundly beat the 
Demons, 97-59. 

Mississippi State played 
everyone dressed out in the 
game and had three players in 
double figures on the evening. 
Bulldog guard Jeff Malone led 
all scorers with 23 points, as he 
was 10 for 15 from the floor 
and three for three from the 
line. Forward Terry Lewis 
followed with 20 points as he 
to was red hot from the field 
shooting 9 for 11 and two out 
of three from the charity line. 
Reserve Chauncey Robinson 
came off the bench with 15 
points and 13 rebounds to lead 
everyone. 

Northwestern was paced by 
guard Kenny Hale with 21 
points as he was also 10 of 15 
from the field and one for one 
from the free throw line. 
Center Johnny Martin had 14 
points and only seven 
rebounds to lead the Demons 
in rebounds. As a team the 
Demons shot 49.1 per cent 
from the floor and the 
Bulldogs shot 53.7 per cent. 

The Demons other three 
starters only combined for a 
total of eight points and nine 
rebounds on the evening. 

Northwestern must improve 
own its shooting percentage 
from the floor, if they expect 



to have as good a chance to 
win the conference as they did 
last year. The Demons must 
also cut down on turnovers as 
they had 33 and the Bulldogs 
only had 20. Northwestern 
must also set a more balanced 



scoring and rebounding attack 
from everyone involved. 

The Bulldogs had good 
support coming off the bench 
as their bench scored 40 points 
and the Demon bench only 
scored 20 points. 



If You Have A Past Due Account- 
You May Not Be Able To Register 

In view of the large size of student bad debts 
on the books, and the large number of 
students who have reached this date without 
completing their schedule of payments agreed 
upon at registration time, it is essential that we 
re-evaluate our credit granting procedure. 

Any student with an outstanding balance at 
the end of November 1 982 must pay it in full 
by means of cash, money order, or cashier's 
check, in order to be able to register for the 
Spring Semester 1983. Furthermore, students 
with outstanding balances may not receive 
their grades or transcript until said balances 
are liquidated. 

In order for a student's registration to be 
completed for the Spring Semester 1983 all 
tuition and fees, including room and board, 
must be paid in full at the time of registration. 
Students who have not completed registration 
will not appear on class rosters. Any 
deviations from the above must approved by 
the Vice President for Fiscal Affairs. 



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******************************** 



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CAME 
KE^ER 

(L I Q U O R) 

Wishing Everyone A 

Merry Christmas 

and 

Good Luck Students 
On Your Finals 



Cane River Shopping Mall 
Next to Winn Dixie 



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******************************* 



Yang Downs Kappa 
Sigma 28-19 



David Saylors hit Wayne 
Lupo with a touchdown pass 
with just over seven minutes to 
play to give the University of 
Yang a 21-19 lead over Kappa 
Sigma, and the Yangster's 
added another touchdown 
moments later to win the in- 
tramural Super Bowl 28-19. 

Yang won the opening toss 
and took possession on the 20 
yard line and mounted a drive 
that stalled on a missed fourth 
and 13 around midfield. 

The Sigs took over but 
Bryan Childers anticipated a 
Randy Bonnette pass early in 
the drive and made an in- 
terception for Yang. 

Saylors then took over and 
drove Yang downfield on 
several out routes. On the 
seventh play of the series, 
Saylors found Joe Cun- 
ningham in the right flats for 
the first score of the night. 
Saylors then connected with 
Lupo for the extra-point to 
put Yang up 7-0. 

On the very next series, 
Kappa Sig put together their 
own drive as they ran four and 
a half minutes off the clock. 
The drive ended with Randy 
Bonnette to David Webb pass 
in the left corner of the end 
zone. Bonnette then ran it in 
himself to tie the game up. 

Yang took over from there, 
but their drive was short-lived 
when Scott Sledge came from 
out of nowhere to make an 
interception and raced un- 
touched 20 yards into the end 
zone to put the Sigs up 13-7. 
A Bonnette to Webb pass was 
incomplete when Webb caught 
the ball three feet out of the 
end zone. 

Down by six points with just 
three minutes to play, Yang 
started what would be their 
final drive on the half. After 
Saylors guided them to a first 
and goal from inside the 20, a 
series of penalties set the 
Yangsters up with a fourth 
and goal from the other side of 
midfield. With just 11 seconds 
'eft, Saylors lofted a "Hail 
M ary" pass to the end zone 
and Cunningham outjumped 
wo Kappa Sigs for the go 
ahead touchdown. The 46 
yard pass tied the game 13-13 
and Joe Bienvenu, who had 
°een playing the last two 
Playoff games and the Super 
°°wl with a factured rib, 
ma ae a timely catch as the 
nalftime whistle 
* dd the extra p u 
y ang ahead 14-13. 

On the first series of the 
«-cond half, the Sigs were 
weed to punt when the Yang 
aetense wouldn't yield, 
ttowever, Yang couldn't move 
™ e ball either in their first 
Possession and 
•orced to punt. 

T he Sigs took 
Bonnette made 



as 

sounded 



to 



extra point, putting 



in 

Saylors 



was 



over 
use of 



and 
four 



different receivers to move the 
ball to the 15 yard line. From 
there he scrambled for the 
touchdown to put the Sigs up 
19-14 with just over 10 
minutes to play. Bonnette 
then tried to hit Webb on an 
"alley-oop" pass for the 
point-after conversion but a 
high-flying Lupo knocked the 
ball away from Webb. 

Yang got the ball again and 
had 60 yards between them 
and the go-ahead touchdown. 
It took just two minutes for 
them to run the length of the 
field when Saylors hit Lupo 
for the game-winning catch 
over the middle. Lupo out- 
raced everybody the last 20 
yards for the touchdown. 
Saylors then found Dean 
Napoli who had to make a 
crucial comeback reception 
for the extra-point. 

The Sigs took the ball and 
mounted another drive hoping 
to go back ahead, but Chris 
Moran made a clutch flag grab 
and downed Jay Vail three 
yards shy of a first down on a 
fourth and long situation. 

The Yangsters took over 
and started down field trying 
to put. the icing on the cake. A 
Saylors to Cunningham pass 
fell incomplete in the end 
zone, but on the very next play 
the same combination 
produced a touchdown on a 
safety blitz. Napoli added his 
second extra-point catch of the 
night to put Yang up by 28-19. 

Kappa Sigma took its last 
possession and started a final 
drive. A pass interference call 
gave them first and goal on the 
one-yard line. On the next 
play, Robert Delrie and 
Donny Harrison poured on a 
furious rush and Harrison 
tipped the ball which landed in 
the hands of Bienvieu who 
raced all the way down to the 
other six yard line before 
Bonnette caught him. 

From there, Saylors just ran 
out the clock on two quick 
plays, and the Yangsters had 
their first Super Bowl locked 
up. 

For the evening, Saylors was 
21 of 33 with four touchdown 
passess and only one in- 
terception. Delrie threw one 
without a completion. For the 
Sigs, Bonnette completed 13 
of 22 passes for one touch- 
down and two interceptions. 

Cunningham led the 
Yangsters with six catches for 
three touchdowns and 
Bienvenu caught five passes. 
Napoli added four grabs to go 
along with a standout 
defensive performance and 
Lupo, Delrie, and Jim Burke 
grabbed the other six passes. 

For Kappa Sigma, Roger 
Reynolds and Jeff Leachman 
each caught three balls and 
David Deveille and Mike 
Brown caught two each. 



Current Sauce, Tuesday. December 7, 1982, Page 7 



Un Kappa Fifth Routs VIP's 40-8 



Lonnie Bank was a one- 
woman show as she scored 22 
points (three touchdowns, 
four extra-points) and threw 
another touchdown pass to 
lead Un Kappa 5th to a 40-8 
victory over the VIP's in the 
Intramural Women's Super 
Bowl. 

The VIP's won the opening 
toss and got first possession on 
the cool wet evening. They 
couldn't move the ball and 
were forced to punt. Un 
Kappa 5th took over at that 
point and put together a 
balanced drive, with skillful 
running and precision passing. 

The drive ended in seven 
points with a Banks to Tandra 
Lewis touchdown pass. Banks 
then ran around right end to 
add the extra-point. 

The VIP's took over and 
tried to even the mark, but a 
Lisa Lennau pass fell in- 
complete on a fourth and six 
try. 

Un Kappa 5th took over and 
their offense picked right up 
where they had left off. The 
Un Kappa's put together 
another massive drive that 
ended in the first of Banks' 
touchdown runs. A Lewis to 
Banks pass produced the 14th 
point of the game, which also 
ended the half with the score 
Un Kappa 5th 14, VIPs' 0. 

Banks finished the first half 
by completing three of eight 
passes and Lewis was two of 
two for the Un Kappa's. 
Lennau threw nine times in the 
first half and completed four 
of them. 

Un Kappa 5th started the 
second half with the ball on 

the 20. They drove down to 
the other 20 yard line, but 



Banks had a pass picked off by 
an alert VIP defender. The 
VIP's were suddenly back in 
the game. 

However, Un Kappa 5th's 
defense proved tough and 
Susan Prince was forced to 
punt. 

Tandra Lewis fielded the 
punt and returned it well over 
60 yards to put Un Kappa 5th 
in command 20-0. This time, 
the extra-point failed. But the 
damage had been done. The 
wind had seemingly been 
blown out of the VIP's sails. 

The VIP's again failed to, 
score and Un Kappa 5th took 
possession again, and the drive 
ended in another Lonnie 
Banks touchdown to up the 
score to 26-6. 

The VIP's turned the ball 
over again on a missed fourth 
down conversion and Un 
Kappa 5th started up again. 
This time the drive ended with 
Banks to Kim Paulk touch- 



down pass with just over five 

minutes to plav. 

The VIP's finally got on the 
scoreboard when Lennau 
threw to Sheila Chance with 
two to play. Lennau then 
threw to Prince for the two 
point conversion to make the 
score 32-8. 

Un Kappa 5th took over the 
20 yard line and capped off the 
drive, and the game with a 
Lonnie Banks touchdown run 
with just 11 seconds to play. 
She then finished her evening 
by running in from 10 yards 
out for the two pofht con- 
version. 

For the evening Banks 
completed 11 of 21 and had 
one T.D. pass while throwing 
one interception. Lewis 
completed three of four at- 
tempts for ond touchdown 
pass for Un Kappa 5th also. 
Lewis scored twice for UK5 
who finished the season 
undefeated. 



40 



Un Kappa 5th 14 26: 
VIP's 8: 8 

Scoring Summary: 

UK5-Banks pass to Lewis (Banks run) 

UK5-Banks run (Lewis pass to Banks) 

UK5-Lewis punt return (run failed) 

UK5-Banks run (run failed) 

UK5-Banks pass to Paulk (run failed) 

VIP-Lennau pass to Chance (Lennau pass to Prince) 

UK5-Banks run (Banks run, 2 pt.) 



Yang 14 14: 28 

Kappa Sigma 13 6: 19 
Scoring Summary: 

Yang-Saylors pass to Cunningham (Saylors to Lupo) 
Sigs-Bonnette pass to Webb (Bonnette run) 
Sigs-Sledge Interception run (run failed) 
Yang-Saylors pass to Cunningham (Saylors to Bienvenu) 
Sigs-Bonnette run (pass failed) 
Yang-Saylors pass to Lupo (Saylors to Napoli) 
Yang-Saylors pass to Cunningham (Saylors to Napoli) 



Pizza iiui 



For pizza out its Pizza Inn: 

1 24 Hwy. 1 South Phone 352-5750 

Hey Students 

It's NSU STUDENT NIGHT at Pizza Inn 

Just bring in your current NSU Student I D. card and receive a25%, Discount on all 
Items on the Menu. 

EVERY WEDNESDAY from 5 pm till 11 pm 



Free Pizza 

With Purchase of any Large, Medium 
or Samll Pizza receive the Next Smaller 
size Free. 

(Not good with any other special or 
coupon.) 

Pizza inn 

For pizza out it's Pizza Inn. sm 
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Free Pitcher 
of Soft Drink 

With Purchase of any large or medium 
Pan Pizza. (Eat in orders only.) 

(Not good with any other special or 
coupon.) 



azzainn 



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For pizza out it's Pizza lnn.' m 

I 352-5250 1 24 Hwy. 1 South 



Current Sauce, Tuesday, December 7, 1982, Page 8 



Porker Picker Panel 



This 

Week's 

Games 



Georgia vs 
Penn St. 



Nebraska vs 
I. SI! 



UCLA vs 
Michigan 



SMU vs 
Pittsburgh 



Oklahoma vs 
Arizona St. 



Arkansas vs 
Florida 



Florida St. 
West Virginia 



Washington vs 
Maryland 



Tennessee vs 
Iowa 



Ohio St. vs 
BYU 



Season 
Record 




Roger 

Reynolds 



Georgia 
28-24 



Nebraska 
35-28 . 



Michigan 
21-17 



SMU 
35-21 



Oklahoma 
35-31 



Arkansas 
21-17 



West Virginia 
24-14 



Washington 
17-14 



Tennessee 
24-14 



Ohio St. 
28-21 



64-36 
.640 




John 

Cunningham 



Georgia 
31-21 



Nebraska 
27-14 



UCLA 
24-21 



SMU 
28-17 



Oklahoma 
35-28 



Arkansas 
51-14 



Fla. St. 
21-17 



Washington 
24-21 



Tennessee 
21-10 



Ohio St. 
27-17 



62-38 
.620 




Alison 

Breazeale 



Penn St. 
27-21 



LSU 
35-24 



UCLA 
28-17 



SMU 
21-10 



Oklahoma 
31-21 



Arkansas 
17-10 



Fla. St. 
14-7 



Washington 
28-7 



Tennessee 
28-14 



Ohio St. 
14-10 



60-40 
.600 




Joe 
Cunningham 



Penn St. 
35-28 



LSU 
28-27 



UCLA 
28-17 



SMU 
21-17 



Oklahoma 
28-21 



Arkansas 
35-14 



Fla. St. 
31-7 



Washington 
28-17 



Tennessee 
21-20 



Ohio St. 
41-14 



65-35 
.650 



Penn St 
28-21 



Nebraska 
24-17 



UCLA 
21-10 



SMU 
14-7 



Oklahoma 
31-17 



Arkansas 
28-7 



Fla. St. 
14-7 



Washington 
20-17 



Iowa 
17-3 



Ohio St. 
38-14 



64-36 
.640 



Georgia 
27-14 



Nebraska 
35-17 



UCLA 
21-14 



SMU 
31-21 



Oklahoma 
28-7 



Arkansas 
17-13 



Fla. St. 
28-7 



Washington 
21-14 



Tennessee 
21-0 



Ohio St. 
35-13 



63-37 
.630 




Penn St. 
21-20 



Nebraska 
35-14 



UCLA 
21-7 



SMU 
31-17 



Oklahoma 
21-20 



Arkansas 
31-28 



Fla. St. 
31-14 



Washington 
21-7 



Tennessee 
21-7 



Ohio St. 
41-14 



58-42 
.580 



The ' 'Choker' ' Chokes, But Panel Fails To Capitalize, 



It came soooner than ex- 
pected, but miraculously, he 
survived it. Yes for the third 
straight year, Porker Picker 
Panel member Joe 'Choke 
City' Cunningham fumbled 
his way to a miserable week in 
P. P. -land and would have lost 
his year-long lead to Sports 
Guru Roger 'Always A 
Bridesmaid, Never The Bride' 
Reynolds, except for Reynolds 
miserable first place showing. 

Reynolds won the P.P. 
Panel's weekly, (or should it 
be weakly?) picks by blowing 
six of 10 games for a 4-6 
worksheet. Tied with 
Reynold's for the dubious 
honor of winning were Mr. 
and Mrs. (or is it Mr. and 
Miss) NSU, Cindy Duke and 
Lytt Allen, or vice-versa, and 
Sports Info Director, Steve 
Roe, an all-league receiver for 
the University of Yang. 

Tied with his older brother 
for last place was John 'I'm so 



confused' Cunningham and 
Alison 'I'm glad it's almost 
over' Breazle, who in- 
cidentally is NOT Joe's older 
brother. 

With just one week 
remaining in the P.P Panel's 
selectioning, the annual bowl 
games jump into the spotlight, 
and they will decide the winner 
of the 1983 Highman Trophy, 
symbol of football forecasting 
excellence. Past winners of 
the Highman Trophy were 
David Owen Stamey, Business 
Manager of the CURRENT 
SAUCE and currently vice- 
president of Stamey and Son's 
Women's Undergarments 
Inc., and also coach and 
general manager of the 
University of Yang, in- 
tramural flag-football 
champs. Stamey won the 
accolade in 1981. And also, 
Dr. Ray 'Boom-Boom' 
Baumgardner who won last 
i year, but who got caught in a 



salary dispute with business 
manager David Saylors earlier 
in the year, and opted to sit 
out the season and sign with 
another panel next year as a 
free-agent. 

Oddsmakers in Las Vegas 
have installed Reynolds as a 2- 
-1 favorite to capture his first 
Highman Trophy, and thereby 
becoming the first 'rookie' 
ever to receive the coveted 
award. Reynolds is currently 
one game behind P.P. leader 
Joe Cunningham, but Las 
Vegas, remembering his past 
chokes, has not given any odds 
on Cunningham for first 
place. However, they say that 
he is a sure winner for at least 
fifth. 

The oddsmakers have 
picked two of the three guest 
selectors to take the second 
and third spots. This would be 
the first time in P.P. history 
that guest selctors would break 
into the top four. 



Rounding out the odds were 
John Cunningham and Alison 
Breazle who were both picked 
at 15-1 longshots. 

Heading into the final week 
of picks, the P.P. Panel 
picked up three local sports 
freaks, one of whom is a past 
winner of the Highman 
Trophy, for what should be an 
exciting bowl lineup. 

James 'Doc' Smith, the 
smartest animal on a softball 
field, and assistant coach of 
the Lady Demons basketball 
squad will be joined by David 
Saylor, an All-American flag- 
football quarterback for the 
University of Yang, and D.O. 
Stamey, who has already been 
afforded more publicity in this 
rag column than he deserves. 



NSU Nips 
Yugoslavia 

Northwestern led at only 
one point in the exhibition 
basketball game with 
Yugoslavia, and fortunately 
for the Demons that was in the 
final seconds as the Demons 
scored a 96-95 win. 

Northwestern started slow 
in the contest, trailing by eight 
points in the first four 
minutes. Although they 
narrowed the gap at times, the 
Demons found themselves 
trailing by 15 points with just 
6:59 left in the game. 

"The best thing that I saw 
on Thursday night was that 
these kids didn't want to 
lose," said Demon Coach 
Wayne Yates. "When we got 
down to the final minutes the 
young men saw the chance for 
victory and were able to get 
it." 

"One of the best things you 
can have is that attitude," 
added Yates. "They just 
decided they didn't want to 
lose and the enthusiasm on the 
floor and with the players that 
were on the bench was very 
encouraging." 

The Demons got their 
winning points with just H 
seconds left when senior guard 
Kenny Hale made of two of 
three free throws to bring the 
Demons from behind. After 
those free throws the visitors 
had a chance to win but missed 
the final shots as time ran out. 

"It was good to win and 
that type of game was what we 
needed," continued Yates. 
"We found out the areas that 
we need the work and now we 
know we have alot of things to 
work on before that first game 
on December 1." 

The Demons had three 
players in double figures, led 
by Johnny Martin with 30 
points and 12 rebounds. Hale 
added 20 points and junior 
forward A.J. Culbreath added 
11 points. Culbreath was 
second behind Martin i n 
rebounds with five as the 
Demons won the rebounding 
battle 46-38. 

Ten of the 14 Demons who 
played in the game found their 
way into the scoring colurnn 
and Yates says that is an in- 
dication of some good and 
some bad. "I've felt since the 
start of practice that we would 
be nine or ten players deep, 
noted Yates. "And 1 continue 
to feel that way. But while ten 
players scored, there were 
several players who did more 
on offense than they did on 
defense." 

"Our physical conditioning 
isn't near where we should be 



and we must improve 



our 



defense," continued Y ateS; 



Students interested in keeping 
statistics for Demons and Lady 
Demons home games please call 7-6466. 



Radical Rag 
is Back! 

Page 4 



Vol. LXX No. 15 




urrent 




auce 




Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 



January 25, 1983 



ReconstructionBegun on Museum 



Tynes Hildebrand Appointed 
Athletic Director 



Northwestern officials have 
begun the reconstruction of 
the Center for History of 
Louisiana Education, an 
outstanding museum lost in 
the Oct. 19 fire which 
destroyed historic Caldwell 
Hall. 

"We are disheartened and 
discouraged, but we are not 
defeated," said Mrs. Maxine 
Southerland, director of the 
state depository that told the 



story of the birth and growth 
of education in Louisiana. 

She added, "I am deter- 
mined to reconstruct from the 
ashes, to give our children and 
grandchildren a living record 
of our educational past. A 
portion of our history died in 
that fire, but how much more 
will be lost if we fail to 
rebuild; for then we have lost 
not only a lot of artifacts, but 
also an idea and a dream." 




Winners were announced recently for the literary and 
arts competition sponsored by Argus, the multi- 
media magazine funded and published by students at 
Northwestern State University. The first-place award 
winners include (standing from left) Rabbi Williams 
of Shreveport for Argus cover, Renee Hughes of Jena 
for photography, (seated from left) Myrna Schex- 
lider of Natchitoches for poetry and Carol Wells of 
Natchitoches for one-act plays. Linda Verrett of 
LeCompte also won first in the personal essay 
competition. 

Sam Goodwin To Be Head Football Coach 



Mrs. Southerlancl said the 
museum had been repleate 
with priceless, one of a kind 
photographs, books, charts, 
machines and numerous rare 
artifacts. "They were all 
valuable bits of antiquity but 
were lost to us forever," she 
stated. 

Within the museum's walls 
were "lovingly-placed 
treasur s, rich in Louisiana's 
educational heritage." 

"Some things can be done," 
Mrs. Southerland said. 
"Louisiana can reconstruct 
this state repository for the 
history of her educational 
past. Surely within the state 
there are many who will feel a 
responsibility to Louisiana's 
children to replace their 
valuable, interesting and 
lovely archives of Louisiana's 
educational historv." 

Artifacts the museum are in 
need of include, books, 
photographs, college year- 
books, children's early school 
clothes, teachers; bells, slates, 
maps, desks, lamps, wooden 
water buckets, lunch pails, 
letters, scrapbooks, charts, 
diaries and other items which 
will tell generations of 
Louisiana's proud roqts in 
education. 

"To reconstruct the 
museum, we need the aid of 
our alumni," said Mrs. 
Southerland. "They might 
have some small artifact that 
they consider insignificant; it 
is not insignificant to us. We 
must rebuild one book at a 
time, one piece at a time. We 
need everything and anything 
connected with education in 
our state." 



Tynes Hildebrand, who 
served as Northwestern State 
University's head basketball 
coach from 1965 through 
1980, has been appointed 
athletic director at NSU. 

Hildebrand replaces A.L. 
Williams, who held the dual 
responsibilities of athletic 
director and head football 
coach before resigning to 
become head coach at 
Louisiana Tech University. 

Orze said, "1 have been 
impressed with Coach 
Hildebrand's organizational 
and administrative abilities, 
his knowledge of athletics, his 
loyalty to Northwestern and 
his commitment to excellence 
in every endeavor that he has 
undertaken." 

The NSU president added, 
"Coach Hildebrand is highly- 
respected in athletic circles 
across the state and nation and 
has long enjoyed the ad- 
miration of the people of the 
university and the community. 
We are fortunate to have an 
individual of his ability and 
integrity directing the 
university's athletic 
program." 

Hildebrand, who is the 
second-winningest coach in 
Northwestern's 70-year 
basketball history, retired 
from coaching in 1980 to 
become director of placement 
and assistant professor of 
health and physical education 
at NSU. 



New A.I). 



Tynes Hildebrand 

photo by Mclanic Dai«Jc | 

Hildebrand, who fell just 
nine wins short of the 200- 
victory mark in his 15 years at 
Northwestern, guided the 
Demons to the NAIA District 
30 crown and the NAIA 
National Tournament with a 
21-9 record in 1973-74. His 
1974-75 team won the Gulf 
South Conference cham- 
pionship. 

GSC Coach of the Year in 
1974-75 and Coach of the Year 
in the old Gulf States Con- 
ference in 1966, Hildebrand 
was one of only 12 college 
coaches in the nation selected 
to train the U.S. Olympic 
basketball team in 1972. He 
was also chosen as the coach 
for the GSC All-Star team's 
tour of Central America in 
1974. 



Dr. Bienvenu Named 
President Emeritus 



Sam Goodwin, offensive 
b ackfield coach at the 
university of Arkansas for the 
Pas t two years, has been 
a PPomted head football coach 
a"d assistant athletic director 
1 Northwestern, according to 
j^U President Dr. Joseph 

The 38-year-old Pineville 
"ajive succeeds A.L. 
Wl Hiams, who has served as 
Northwestern's head coach 
since 1975. Williams was 
ln, ormed before the season 



that his contract would not be 
renewed for 1983. 

Responsible for coaching 
quarterbacks and running 
backs at Arkansas, Goodwin 
was selected from among 27 
applicants for the Nor- 
thwestern position. The NSU 
Athletic Council narrowed the 
field to three finalists, and 
Orze made the final selection 
of the new coach. 

Orze said Goodwin and 
Billy Laird, Northwestern's 
assistant head coach, "were 



the two outstanding can- 
didates for the position in my 
evaluation." Orze said Laird 
was offered the job but 
declined the position "for 
personal reasons." 

The Northwestern president 
stated that he was "impressed 
by Sam Goodwin's enthusiasm 
for football and his 
philosophy not only of the 
game but also of how it fits 
within the university en- 
vironment." 

(Continued on page 2) 



The Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities has named Dr. 
Rene J. Bienvenu as president 
emeritus of Northwestern. 

Bienvenu served as Nor- 
thwestern's 14th president 
from 1978 until his retirement 
on June 1, 1982. He was 
succeeded by Dr. Joseph J. 
Orze, who was elected last 
December to become the 
university's chief executive. 

In 32 years of service to 
Northwestern, Bienvenu was 
not only president for four 
years but also held the 
positions of dean and 
department head. 

Bienvenu, a nationally- 



known scientific researcher 
and writer, was appointed 
acting president of Nor- 
thwestern in 1977 and became 
the university's president on 
Feb. 1, 1978. 

He was a faculty member 
and administrator at NSU for 
27 years before serving briefly 
as assistant dean of the School 
of Allied Health at the 
Louisiana State University 
Medical Center in Shreveport, 
the position he held when he 
was appointed acting president 
of NSU. 

Before moving to the LSU 
position, Bienvenu was dean 
of the College of Science and 
Continued on Page 2 



f he Current Sauce. January 25. 1983. Page 2 



College of Science and Technology 
Receives Microcomputer System 



Goodwin Named Football Coach 



A laboratory equipped with 
20 Olivetti M20 microcom- 
puters has been established by 
the College of Science and 
Technology at Northwestern. 

The microcomputers were 
purchased with a $160,578 
grant which NSU received 
from the National Science 
Foundation to provide 
computer-assisted instruction 
for students in science and 



... Bienvenu 

Continued from Page 1 

Technology at Northwestern 
for 10 years and was chairman 
of the NSU Department of 
Microbiology from 1960 to 
1967. 

A past president of the State 
Colleges and Universities 
Presidents' Council, Bienvenu 
was a microbiologist at 
Confederate Memorial 
Hospital in Shreveport and ai 
chemist for Leland Hamner) 
Company in Houston before 
joining the Northwestern 
faculty in 1950. 

He earned the bachelor of 
science degree in zoology from 
LSU in 1944 and the master of 
science degree in bacteriology 
from LSU in 1949. He 
received his doctorate in 
microbiology from the 
University of Texas in 1957. 



technology academic 
programs. 

"The microcomputer," said 
science and technology dean 
Dr. Edward W. Graham, 
"incorporate most of the 
advance computer technology j 
currently available, including 
16-bit microprocessors and 
high resolution, color 
graphics." 

He added, "Northwestern 
has the first microcomputer of 
this type in the South. The 
laboratory will be used for 
computer-assisted instruction 
in mathematics and sciences." 

According to Graham, 
"This system will be unique 
for teaching problem-solving, 
simulation and model 
building. In addition to this 
effect to provide the most 
effective educational 
technology for our students, 
we will seek to have all 
graduates of our programs 
competent in the use of 
computers." 

The NSU dean said com- 
puter modeling will be 
developed and applied in 
various courses in chemistry, 
physics, geology, ecology, 
physiology and genetics. 

Experiments will be 
simulated with the computers 
to allow students to develop 
proficiency and understanding 



he Be#t place 
to find a 
helping hand 
is at the end 
of your arm 




These words to live by have an old-fashioned 
ring, but they apply to the energy situation facing 
us today. It seems clear that, if we're to meet our 
growing energy requirements, we must rely on 
the technology at hand. And the majority of 
scientists and energy leaders agree that nuclear 
power and coal are the best means of meeting 
these requirements. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

t Vnlr.il loiif-.i.in.i HiMru l omp,tm t.ulr M.ilr* ttihliiS 
UimiMin UmiM.m.i I'ltiui X I <i;ht.<.timp.m\ \»*vv Ofli'.iiv, Tulilu 
•M't\iu- hit NiwlimtMnn HiVtrn l'm\W V5*|i.im 



before doing the actual ex- 
periments. 

"On-line computer control 
of experiments will be used to 
optimize results and to collect 
and analyze data," stated 
Graham, who added that a 
team of faculty and students is 
being formed to develop 
computer-assisted in- 
structional programs. 

"This computer-assisted 
instructional system will not 
replace the personal com- 
mitment of the faculty to the 
students but rather will 
supplement and extend the 
more conventional lecture 
system," said Graham. 




(Continued from page 1) 

"Obviously, "'said Orze, "I 
am deeply impressed with 
Sam's winning record as a 
high school and college coach 
but most of all with his 
winning attitude as a person." 

He said Goodwin "comes 
from one of the outstanding 
major football powers in the 
country, and his young, 
proven, dynamic leadership 
will help develop excellence in 
the football program at 
Northwestern." 

Another factor in Good- 
win's selection, Orze said, "is ' 
his close association through 
the years with high school 
coaches players in Louisiana. 
He was an outstanding athlete 
at Pineville High School and 
has recruited the state for the 
University of Arkansas." 

Goodwin said he is "ex- 
tremely happy and excited that 
the administration and athletic 
council of Northwestern have 
shown the confidence in me to 
lead the university's football 
program." 



He added, "I know there is 
a tough challenge ahead, but I 
also see a golden opportunity. 
I am grateful to Coach Lou 
Holtz at Arkansas for his 
support on my behalf but most 
of all for the personal interest 
he has taken in me in the past 
two years. I will never forget 
my experiences with the 
Razorbacks." 




People 
Power 



'helps 
'prevent 
birth 
defects 

Support 
March of Dimes 



USIM9 ONLY 
THE 8EST 
Mi ATS 




HICKORY HUT 

BAR-B-Q 
RESTAURANT 



342a Hwy, 1 South 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 
TELEPHONE 318/352-3720 
We Are A Member of the NSU Booster Club 



CATEKIN9 

service 
available 

(Contact Damian Brumley. 
Manager) 



PLATES 

regular 

COMBINATION $4.95 

BEEF 

RIBS 

PORK 

SAUSAGE 

HAM 

CHICKEN 



$3.75 

$3.49 

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(includes 2 side orders) 



large 

$5.95 
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$4.75 
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BEEF 

SAUSAGE 
PORK. . . 
HAM ... 



SANDWICHES 



regular 

$2.25 
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po-boy 

$2.95 
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$275 
$2.75 



SIDE ORDERS 



Individual Serving . 
Pints 



. $ 75 
. $1.50 



Cole Slaw, Potato Salad, Baked Beans. Dirty Rice, Fried Okra & Squash 



FAMILY MAC PAKS - For Family of Four 



2 Pounds of Beef $17.40 

2 Pounds (app.) Rib Rack $13.49 



2 Pounds of Ham or Pork $14.40 

1 Large Chicken $ 6.79 

"Mac Paks" include: 1 pint each of Potato Salad. Baked Beans, Cole Slaw, and rolls with McAdam's fabulous 
bar-b-que sauce 



BY THE POUND (Chicken by the bird, app. 3 lbs.) 



beef . 

RIBS. 

PORK 



$7.50 SAUSAGE $4 50 

$4 95 HAM $5 95 

$5 95 CHICKEN $4 25 



Your favorite beverage on tap! 

All orders come without sauce, we supply it. you apply itl 

We do custom cooking of Hams and Turkeys! 

Call Ahead for really prompt service on take-out orders! 



All NSU Students Get 10% Discount with NSU ID. 



Welcome Back For Another Year and Lets Enjoy It 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 3 



PRSSA To Hold 
Monthly Seminar 

A series of eight 
professional development 
workshops has been organized 
by the North Louisiana 
Chapter of the Public 
Relations Society of America 
and will be offered to public 
relations practitioners, 
students and the general 
public, according to series 
chairman Gregg Trusty, public 
relations specialist at Western 
Electric' s Shreveport Works 
and immediate past president 
of the PRSA chapter. 

The series will be conducted 
on the first Thursday of each 
month in 1983 except January, 
July, August and October, 
Trusty said, and will cover a 
wide range of topics from 
community relations to 
problem-solving. All the 
workshops will be at the 
Ramada Inn, Monkhouse at I- 
20 in Shreveport. 

Creating and implementing 
a community relations 
program will be the topic of 
the Feb. 3 workshop and 
developing a total com- 
munications program will be, 
discussed at the March 3 
session. The April. 7 program 
will deal with public research 
and a photographic workshop 
is set for May 5. 

Working with public 
relations/advertising agencies 
is the topic of the June 2 
session; organizing special 
events will be discussed at the 
Sept. 1 workshop, and audio- 
visual/multi-media presen- 
tations will be the Nov. 3 
program. The series will 
conclude with a round-table 
" discussion on Dec. 1 designed 
to give ideas on how to solve 
the participants' actual public 
relations problems. 

Each workshop will begin at 
10 a.m. and conclude at 3 p.m. 
Lunch will be included in the 
$15 registration fee. Discount 
rates for the series are 
available to persons who 
register by the Jan. 13, 1983, 
series registration deadline. 
Persons may also register for 
individual workshops 
throughout the year. Ad- 
ditional information may be 
obtained by calling Trusty at 
459-6164. 

Northwestern State 
University students from all 
majors are eligible to attend 
an y or all the seminar 
sessions. A special student 
discount rate is available and 
m ay be paid in installments. 

Franklin Presson, Room 
225-E Kyser Hall, phone Ext. 
5339, is the NSU coordinator 
•or the seminar series and for 
transportation to and from 
Shreveport. 



Support Northwestern- 
Watch a Basketball Game 



Pom Pom 
Line Chosen 

Eleven NSU students have 
been selected to perform this 
year with the basketball pom 
pon line, an auxiliary dance 
group which entertains during 
NSU home basketball games 
in Prather Coliseum. 

The NSU basketball pom 
pon line, now in its third year, 
is directed by Vicki Parrish, 
instructor of dance at Nor- 
thwestern. The 11 member of 
the group were selected during 
auditions conducted earlier 
this fall. 

Vaneesa McGaskey, senior 
business administration major 
from Robeline, is the captain 
of the NSU basketball pom 
pon line. 

Other members of the group 
are Monique Escuriex, 
freshman, general curriculum, 
New Iberia; Brenda Goleman, 
sophomore, social work, 
Natchitoches; Stacy 
Baumgardner, sophomore, 
business administration, 
Natchitoches; Felicia Beavers, 
junior, nursing, Baton Rouge; 
Mary Ann Bishop, 
sophomore, pre-physical 
therapy, Rayville; Sarah Jean 
McKnight, sophomore, 
speech-hearing-languarge arts, 
Natchitoches; Amy Whitford, 
freshman, dance, Nat- 
chitoches: Michelle 
Couvillion, freshman, dance, 
Baton Rouge; Allison 
Breazeale, senior business 
administration, Natchitoches, 
and Stacy Keller, sophomore, 
interior design, DeKalb, Tex. 



Fisher Appointed Director of ROTC 



Col. William R. Fisher has 
l been appointed professor of 
military science and director 
o'f the U.S. Army Senior 
Reserve Officers Training 
Corps program at 'North- 
western. 

Fisher, whose appointment 
was approved recently by the 
Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities, succeeds Lt. Col. 
Walter B. Harris, who retired 
this fall after 26 years of 
service in the military. 

In addition to his duties on 
the Natchitoches campus of 
Northwestern, Fisher will also 
manage the university's cross- 
enrollment ROTC programs at 
Louisiana College in Pineville, 
Louisiana State University in 
Shreveport and Centenary 
College in Shreveport. 

Fisher's last assignment 
before moving to Nor- 
thwestern was at Fort Ord, 
Calif., where he was director 
of training at the U.S. Army's 
Organizational Effectiveness 
Center and School. The 
school trained military and 
civilian personnel to become 
organizational consultants. 

Northwestern's military 
science professor and ROTC 
director was graduated from 
Colorado College as a 
distinguished military 
graduate with a bachelor of 
arts degree in education. He 
also holds the master's degree 
in counseling from Dominican 



Lady of the Bracelet 
To Be February 9 



On February 9, beginning at 
7 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom, will be the annual 
Lady of the Bracelet beauty 
pageant, sponsored by 
Northwestern's Student Union 
Governing Board. 

Nine NSU coeds will be 
vying for the title of Miss 
Northwestern and the op- 
portunity to represent the 
university in the Miss 



Louisiana pageant, a 
preliminary to the Miss- 
America crown. 

Director of this year's 
pageant is June Johnson, a 
sophmore Fashion Mer- 
chandising major from Fort 
Polk. Preparation for the 
pageant has been going on in 
early October. According to 
June, the emcee will be Janet 
Hill-Rice from Shreveport. 



Gov. Dave Treen to Appear 



Governor Dave Treen will present a LOUISIANA UPDATE 
January 25th, sponsored by the Governmental Affairs com- 
mittee of the Natchitoches Area Chamber of Commerce. 

Stacy Williams, chairman of the committee, has set a noon 
luncheon to be held in the Student Union Ballroom on the 
Northwestern State University campus. 

Governor Treen is scheduled to give an indepth report on the 
Special Session of the Legislature. The event is open to the 
public, with special invitations to attend issued to clubs and 
organizations. 

The Natchitoches Kiwanis Club, Lion's Club and Rotary Club 
have set their weekly meeting dates to coincide with the date of 
the luncheon. In addition, members of the Natchitoches 
Business and Professional Women's Club and American Legion 
Gordon Peter's Post No. 10 will also attend. 

Ticket prices at $6.50 per person and may be obtained at the 
Chamber of Commerce office. Reservations may be made, but 
the deadline for both ticket purchase and reservation will be 
Friday, January 21st. 



College and the master's and 
doctoral degrees in clinical 
psychology from the 
California Psychological 
Studies Institute. 

He has served in various 
armor and aviation units 



during his military career, 
which has included assign- 
ments in Korea, Vietn am and 
Germany. His numerous 
awards include a special 
commendation from the 
government of Korea. 




Mr. Taco- 

Polar Bear 
Ashburn 

Daily Specials 



Mon. & Tues. - Tacos 2 for $ 1 00 
Wed. & Thurs. - Combination Burrito $ 1 00 
Fri. & Sat. - Nachos 99* 
Sun. (Polar Bear Location Only) - 
Old-fashioned banana split - $ 1 75 



Monday thru Thursday 

The Kevin Stewart Band 

Tuesday 

Budweiser Raise Hell Night 

Free pitchers of cold Budweiser beer to the 
table that can raise the 'most hell. 



Wednesday 

The famous Bojangles $ 5.00 Beer Bust 
5.00 for all the draft beer you can drink from J 
5:30 till 1 2:30. 



8 



Thursday 

Budweiser Light Ladies Night 

No cover charge and 2 free Budweiser Lights 
for all ladies. 



Friday & Saturday 

Billy Pendleton & Earth 
Return to Bojangles 



Happy Hour 6-8 pm 
All Longnecks 75* 
8-10 pm every night 

Proper Attire & I.D. Required 



p 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 4 




Put The Poor Out Of Sight 



Faces In The News. . . 
And Out Of The News 



Major reshuffling in the personnel structure of this school 
during the Christmas holidays produced some new faces in new 
positions and some old faces in new positions. By now I'm sure 
all of you arc aware that our new football coach is Sam 
Goodwin, formerly assistant coach under Lou Holtz at the 
University of Arkansas. 

Our old coach, A.L. Williams is now the head coach at arch- 
rival Louisiana Tech, joining former NSU track coach Jerry 
Dyes, who produced his share of All-Americans here, as did 
Williams. 

Taking over Williams job as Athletic Director is Tynes 
Hildcbrand, former NSU basketball coach and more recently, 
Director of Student Placement. 

Now all of this is probably old news to most of you, but I 
can't resist the oppurtunity to express a few last thoughts on the 
situation surrounding the positioning of these three men in their 
new jobs. 

Northwestern just brings bad publicity to itself when it uses 
cutthroat policies to "get rid of people we don't like." 

We didn't want A.L. Williams because he wasn't a winner, or 
so they said. Actually, when he was hired, he was told he 
wouldn't have a winner for at least five years. This, the then 
president of the university told him. He fooled us. By year five 
he had had a couple of winners. We fired Williams because he 
couldn't beat Tech. Whereupon, after we fired him, Tech made 
him their head football coach! According to a very 
knowledgcablefootball source and former Tech assistant 
football coach, "A.L. Williams had, collectively, the best group 
of assistant football coaches in the state. And Williams is as fine 
a head coach as their is." Now who does than make look dumb? 

We offered the head coaching job to Billy Laird, Williams 
offensive coordinatorhere. Laird asked if things were going to 
be different money-wise around here. Specifically, was the 
athletic department going to operate under the same budget it 
had when Williams was here? He was told that the athletic 
department would indeed have the same budget. Laird said; 
find another head coach. 

Sam Goodwin was the next choice. Goodwin has an out- 
standing resume. Sam Goodwin seems to be the same kind of 
outstanding person and coach that Willimams was. I've seen 
him recruiting students for NSU already, and not just the 
football kind of student either. He is friendly, pleasant, and 
indeed very enthusiastic about NSU. He is a credit to Nor- 
thwestern. It is, in my opinion, an unfortunate thing that we 
released A.L. Williams. But 1 firmly believe that Sam Goodwin 
was the best possible choice to replace him. 

What more can be said about Tynes Hildebrand than that he 
is a super person. He took a nearly non-existent Placement 
Office and really worked hard to make it something. He was 
ALWAYS thinking of the student first. I don't believe that NSU > 
could have found a better replacement. Hildebrand has always 
been very respected at whatever job he has had. When he was a 
basketball coach here, he was asked to train young players for 
the Olympics. That right there shows you something about the 
ability of the man to do a job right. 

Now that the new positions have been filled, it's time to turn 
our attention to helping Northwestern's image. This whole ugly 
affair didn't do much good to that image, and it's time to start 
doing some positive things. 

First of all, we need internal support. We can start by 
showing up for some basketball games and supporting the teams 
that carry the Northwestern name. Just once I'd like to see our 
^president, the other vice-presidents, teachers, and of course, 
students, who don't make the basketball games come to them. 
And I'm not talking about showing up only when you give out 
an award or receive one. 

Northwestern needs our support. And it's up to us to show it. 
We can do other things in addition to going to basketball games. 
The GSGA needs committee members. KNWD needs DJ's. The 
SAUCE could always use more writers and I'm not just talking 
about students either. Teachers, you need to realize that this is 
the UNIVERSITY paper. Your articles are appreciated too. 

We all need to get behind NSU, and really make it the place 
f or you. - Joe Cunningham 




John Hess 



The trouble with the poor is 
ihat they are no longer in- 
visible. 

An affluent citizen of 
Phoenix complained to ABC 
that he couldn't watch a news 
broadcast or open a paper 
without seeing "negative" 
reports about the jobless and 
the homeless. 
He said this 
had to 
discourage 
people from 
getting off 
their duffs and 
finding work. 

The chap 
said things 
were lots worse during the 
Great Depression of the 1930s 
but he didn't know it, because 
there was no television then. 
And he came out fine, he did. 

By the same reasoning, 
some people say TV made us 
lose the Vietnam War. The 
army would have gone ahead 
and won it, only the media 
kept rubbing our noses in it 
until we got fed up with it and 
changed the program. 

The man from Phoenix has 
a point, of sorts. 

The poor we have always 
had with us, but until recently, 
we could keep them out of 
mind. They were mostly hill 
folks in Appalachia or blacks 
and Hispanics. When we did 
think of them, we might tell 
ourselves that their trouble 
was something they had 
brought on themselves by 
being born what they were. 
But those auto workers 



losing their homes, those 
farmers losing their farms, 
those shopkeepers going broke 
- they could be any of us. 
That's scary. 

Something like one out of 
seven adult Americans are 
counted as out of work or 
have quit looking. As that 
Phoenix fellow said, that 
leaves most of us still in pretty 
good shape, so why don't they 
show the happy ones on TV '. 

Actually, he s a bit too 
sensitive. The TV I watch 
blooms with prosperity: 
commercials full of goodies, 
and soap operas set in luxury. 
Even the cops and secretaries 
on TV live in apartments you 
couldn't touch for less than 
$1, 500a month. 

But let that pass. It is true 
in the 1930s as many as cne 
of four were out of work, and 
we didn't need TV to tell us. 
So we threw out the GOP and 
brought in the WPA. We 
adopted unemployment in- 
surance, home relief, Social 
Security, public housing and 
programs to save the farmers. 

Beginning with World War 
II, the. picture changed. Credit 
was cheap and easy; sign here 
and buy a house, a car, a color 
TV, a swimming pool, whole 
generations grew up believing 
that prosperity was forever. 
And the poor, the undeserving 
poor, became a burden on the 
taxpayers. 

In 1967, a longtime publicist 
for General Electric named 
Ronald Reagan said anybody 
had a right to go fishing, but 



"he doesn't have the right to 
force his neighbors to support 
him." 

Yeah, right on. So the shock 
became all the more 
demoralizing when members 
of his audience tumbled from 
affluence to pauperdom 
overnight. 

President Reagan, busy 
dismantling the welfare state, 
has earnestly proposed that 
every business consider hiring 
one more employee. Since 
there are 14.7 million 
businesses, he explained, that 
should take care of the 
problem. 

Since most of those 
businesses are one-man or 
even part-time operations, 
many of them having a hard 
time staying above water, that 
would be quite a trick. What 
it would do to the sacred goal 
of productivity is another 
question. 

Switching gears, the 
president waves the want ads 
and insists that there are 
plenty of jobs, for those with 
the right skills and the right 
frame of mind. He had of 
course killed the federal job- 
training program, but he 
works hard at improving our 
morale. 

His chief obstacle is those 
lines of jobless, those growing 
Reaganvil.les, those farm 
auctions. And the solution is 
simple: Put them out of sight, 
and we can stay the course 
with a clear conscience. 



RADICAL RAG 

Fourth V.P. Idea Seems Dumb 



Multiple Choice Quiz: 
Northwestern Needs: (a) 35 
story dormitory (b) 35 story 
classroom building (c) 4 Vice- 
Presidents (d) None of the 
Above 

Correct Answer: (d) None 
of the Above 

As preposterous as the three 
choices a, b, and c may seem, 
there are plans afoot for 
Choice c to have four vice- 
presidents. In the 
reorganization proposal 
President Orze presented to 
the faculty in November, he 
outlined four vice- 
presidencies, as plans go now, 
this proposal will go the Board 
of Trustees in February for 
final approval prior to im- 
plementation. 

Faculty members have 
related how under President 
Kilpatrick there were foar vice- 
presidents. When Dr. 
Bienvenu came in to office, he 
decided there should only be 
two-Administration and 
Finance and Academic 



Affairs. 

Now Dr. Orze has decided 
to add two more which is hard 
to comprehend in times of 
decreasing enrollment and 
declining revenues. The title 
alone costs the university to 
pay the person a higher salary 
than a dean or other lower' 
ranking position. 

To Dr. Orze's credit he does . 
propose to delay hiring the 
Vice-President of University 
Affairs until funds are 
available. However to have a 
Vice-President of Student 
Affairs, and a Vice-President 
for Academic Affairs makes 
little practical sense in light of 
the costs involved in extra 
salaries, secretraries and the 
other costs associated with 
maintaining an office. 

What this writer sees as 
more important is the jobs 
being performed in the offices 
where they exist now rather 
than creating new levels of 
bureaucracy for students to 
atteinnt to figure out how to 



shuffle papes or get things 
done. 

With our small student 
body, possibly the university 
could manage to operate quite 
efficiently with no Vice- . 
Presidents and in the proces 
save lots of money and really 
be more efficient. Let there be 
a Dean of the College to 
handle all the academic 
matters associated with a Vice- 
President of Academic Af- 
fairs~in other words this Dean 
would be Dean of deans and 
paid a dean's salary. Then a 
Controller could perform the 
financial affairs of the 
university and Northwestern 
already has one of those in 
addition to a Vice-President of 
Financial Affairs. 

The Dean of Students could 
still serve in the same capacity 
he is doing now with no ad- 
dition in title, no increase in 
salary, and no new ad- 
ministrative assistants with 
impressive titles of Assistant 
(Continued on page 5) 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 5 



More Radical Rag 

Fourth V.P. 



• • • 



(Continued from page 4> 

Deans and prooably 

corresponding pay increases. 

The other new vice- 
presidency is University 
Affairs which includes 
academic support such as 
recruiting and admissions as 
well maintenance of the 
physical facility. The basic 
question is do we really need a 
V-P of maintenance when a 
much lower paid position 
could supervise the physical 
plant and maintenance. The 
recruiting and admission 
function, as important as it is 
to our furture could be directly 
responsible to the President or 
the Vice-President of 
Academic Affairs or the Dean 
of Students. Do we need 
another layer of bureaucracyto 
further confuse or impeded 
our recruiting function? From 
the experience of the student 
body and contact with the 
university, what is needed is 
one person that can speak with 
authority and knowledge 
rather than just more people 



speaking in every direction 
without the ability to make 
decisions. 

The concept of ad- 
ministrative reorganization is 
important to Northwestern 
and one that needs to be done 
quickly; however adding more 
top level jobs to a school 
already top heavy with ad- 
ministrators does not seem like 
a solution, instead only a 
worsening of the problem. 

A university is important 
because it is here to serve 
students, and any way that it 
can better serve the student 
body should be a goal of 
Northwestern. However it is 
difficult from the vantage 
point as a student to see how 
four vice-presidents can help 
achieve the goal of better 
serving our student our 
student population. 
Hopefully Dr. Orze and others 
in Roy Hall will re-examine 
the need for four vice- 
presidents before submitting 
the reorganization plan to 
Baton Rouge. 



SUGB Announces Events 
For Spring Semester 



Argus Deadline February 28 

The Spring 1983 literary and arts contest is open for sub- 
missions! Deadline for the contest and publication in the Argus 
is February 28, 1983. Bring entries to the Argus office in Kyser 
Hall, Room 316-A, and fill out a cover card. Guidelines are 
available. Categories include short stojpy, poetry, one-act play, 
essay, feature articles, art, and black and white photography. 



By Beatrice Dawson 

The Student Union 
Governing Board has started 
the ball rolling for the 1983 
spring semester with a host of 
activities including movies 
which will be shown at 7:30 
p.m. in Kyser Auditorium, 
video presentations that will 
be shown at various times 
during the day, the Lady of 

the Bracelet Pageant and 
various artists. "Our annual 
budget is being checked to see 
what and if other activities can 
be added to the schedule," 
stated Camille Hawthorne, 
. Coordinator of Organizations 
and Student Activities. She 
explained that the amount of 

! their budget depends on the 
size of enrollment for the 
semester. If the budget is 
sufficient then "more ac- 
tivities will be scheduled later 
on in the semester," 
proclaimed Ken Boyle, SUGB 
program advisor. 

Jan. 25 - Dave Rudolf, 
guitarist and soloist, will 
appear at 1 p.m. in Student 
Union Lobby. 

Jan. 27 & 28 - Movie: "The 
Road Warrior" which is the 



Dave 11 ' 1 ? aw the Wind " by Bob 



Jamieson and Mark Thomp- 
son. H 

March 14-18 -Union Week- 
Video - "Conan the 
ibarian" 



Bar- 



sequel to "Mad Max". 

Feb. 2 - Magician 
Willis: TBA 

Feb. 2-4 - Video Presen- 
tation: "Stripes" 
Feb. 7 & 8 - Carnation Sale 
Feb. 9 - Lady of the Bracelet ' 
Beauty Pageant at 7 p.m. in March 16- Comedy Team: 
the Student Union Ballroom Williams and Reid - TBA 
Feb. 23 - Hezekiah and the April 7 & 8 Movie: "Night 
House Rockers: Blues Jazz Shift" 

April 14 & 15 - Movie: 
Movie: "Psycho" 

; April 21 & 22 -Movie: "Stir 
Crazy" 

April 28 & 29 - Movie: 
March 7 - Multimedia "The World According to 
slide and music presentation: ,Garp" 



Group - TBA 

Feb. 24 & 25 
"Altered-States" 

March 3 & 4 - Movie: 
"Time after Time" 



THE WORD IS OUT! 
"ROAD WARRIOR' 
IS A HIT! 

Thurs. & Fri., Jan. 27 & 28 
7:30 pm Kyser 

THE ROAD 
WARRIOR 



(Rj-ii- 




* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 

* 



RIVER 

LIQUOR) 



Inventory 
Reduction 

Sale! 



Crown Royal 


750 ml 


$ 11.99 


Seagrams 7 


750 ml 


$ 5.99 


Jack Daniels 


750 ml 


$ 8.69 


Seagrams Gin 


750 ml 


$ 5.39 


Riunite or Cella 


750 ml 


$ 2.99 


Riunite or Cella 


1.51 


$ 5.69 



Welcome Back NSU Students 



* 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 6 



Drink it up & 
keep the cup ! 



The cups 
are on us! 



Domino's Pizza is giving 
away a free plastic cup 
and lid ! Order a cola with 
your pizza and we'll give 
you something to 
remember us by. The 
colorful Domino's Pizza 
cup holds a generous 16 
ounces and comes with 
its own lid. Made of 
durable plastic, it is dish- 
washer safe and reusable. 
You'll want to collect a 
dozen ! 

Take advantage of this 
special offer, good while 



supplies last. No coupon 
necessary. 

At Domino's Pizza we 
make only pizza... pizzas 
are our business... fast, 
free delivery is our 
specialty. Give us a call! 

Fast, Free Delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Phone 352-6382 

Our drivers carry less 
than $10.00. 
Limited delivery area. 

© 1 983 Domino's Pizza, Inc. 





Order a 12" Price 
Destroyer and get 2 free 
cups of Coke. Keep the 
reusable cup and lid. Just 
tell us you want the NSU 
plastic cups. 

Fast, Free Delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Phone 352-6382 





Order a 16" Price 
Destroyer and get 4 free 
cups of Coke. Keep the 
reusable cup and lid. Just 
tell us you want the NSU 
plastic cups. 

Fast, Free Delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Phone 352-6382 



Domino's Pizza Delivers. 





Order a 1 2" 2-item or more 
and get 1 free cup of 
Coke. Keep the reusable 
cup and lid. Just tell us you 
want the NSU plastic cups. 

Fast, Free Delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Phone 352-6382 



Order a 1 6" 2-item or more 
and get 2 free cups of 
Coke. Keep the reusable 
cup and lid. Just tell us you 
want the NSU plastic cups. 

Fast, Free Delivery 
601 Bossier St. 
Phone 352-6382 




(ft 

o 

2 N 
ON 
Q 0. 



Fast, Free 

Delivery 

352-6382 

601 Bossier 

£ 1 983 Domino's Pizza, Inc. 




Organizations 



Phi Beta Sterna 

The Zeta Iota Chapter of 
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity 
would like to extend best 
wishes and much success for a 
good semester to returning 
students and incoming 
freshmen. The brothers of the 
blue and white are prepared 
for the second half of the year 
to exemplify themselves 
brotherly, scholarly and in 
service. 

The brothers of Sigma this 
past year were able to send a 
brother to Atlanta, Georgia 
for the fraternity's National 
Convention. Larry Hall had 
the pleasure of residing with 
distinction in the world's 
tallest hotel, the Westin 
Peachtree Plaza. The ex- 
perience was a joyous one as 
he had the honor of meeting 
distinguished individuals such 
as Mrs. Coretta Scott King 
and the president of the 
National Urban League John 
Jacobs. He also met with 
former New York 
congresswoman Shirley 
Chisom, her successor and frat 
brother Edolphus Towns who 
won the 11th congressional 
seat in the Nov. elections. 

The brightest experiences of 
Wall's days in Atlanta were 
touring the historic sites of Dr. 
Martin Luther King, Jr., the 
Greek show, concert shows, 
beauty pageants, discos, 
restaurants and observing 
Atlanta's rich and progressive 
growth in business and in- 
dustry. 



Delta Zeta 



Delta Zeta would like to 
announce our 1983 officers. 
They are: President, Debbie 
Keene; Rush Chairman, Susan 
^croggins; Pledge Trainer, 
Amy Viator; Recording; 
Secretary, Denise Chance; 
Corresponding Secretary, 
Karen Kieferr; and Treasurer, 
Christine Avant. 

We would like to thank 
Alumnae Stacia Caldwell and 
^andy Vercher for the 
Christmas party they gave us 
as Stacia's home. We would 
to thank the Tau Kappa 
tpisilon pledges for the 
beautiful Christmas tree. 

Delta Zeta has recently 
°egun collecting money for 
° Ur Philanthropy, Gaulludett 
Allege for the deaf. Now we 

form j )lanning our s P rin 8 

Co ngratulations to 
pristine Avant who was 
"amed Panhellenic treasurer, 
and congratulations to the new 
'grna Kappa initiates 

Finally we would like to say 
tn anks Triplett. We Love You. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon Delta Sigma Theta 



The Epsilon Upsilon 
chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
wish to welcome everyone 
back to NSU this Spring 
semester. Hope everyone had 
a safe and a happy holiday. 
Upon returning this semester, 
we the brothers of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon held their annual 
officers election. We would 
like to thank the outgoing 
officers for a job well done. 
T ne new officers are 
President-Michael Miguez, 
Vice-President- Jon Robbins, 
Chaplain-Robert Berthet, 
Treasurer-John Williams, 
Educator-Bruce Bryant, 
Secretary-Denis Jeffares, 
Historian-Marty Guillory, and 
Seargent-At-Arms-Greg Des- 
hotell. We would also like to 
welcome three new members 
into our bond. They are Greg 
Deshotell, Todd David, and 
Denis Jeffares. We also 
pledged six more associate 
members, Kevin Hebert, Doug 
Warrick, Ernie Goleman, 
Frank Sisson, Pete Adams, 
and Daryl Harville. We iook 
forward to another great 
semester at NSU. Remember- 
TKE is Unique. 

4 

Photo Club 

All students interested in 
photography are invited to 
attend the Northwestern 
Association of Photographers' 
first meeting of the spring 
semester tomorrow, 26 Jan., 
at 4:00 p.m., roOm 106, 
Ky ser Hall. Photo contests, 
money-making projects, and 
an introduction of the new 
officers willbejust part of the 
fun. 



The Sorors of the Iota Mu 
Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta 
Sorority, Incorporated would 
like to take this time out to 
welcome everyone back to 
NSU. We hope you all en- 
joyed the holidays and are 
ready to begin the semester. 

The Chapter held its first 
formal meeting of the semester 
Sunday, January 16, at 2:00. 
Among the topics discussed 
were service projects and 
programs for the semester. 

The sorority decided to visit 
a local nursing home as a 
service project for the month 
of January. 

The Sophisticated Gent 
Pageant is scheduled for 
February 22 at 7:00. Ad- 
mission is set for one dollar 
($1.00). Any young men who 
are interested in participating 
in the pageant should contact 
Soror Darlene Brown. Prizes 
will be awarded. 

Lastly, Iota Mu would like 
to extend a hearty 
congratulations to Sorors Vera 
LaCour, Beverly Armstrong,, 
and Mischelle Barrett for 
being nominated to Who's 
Who. We would also like to 
congratulate our fraternity 
brothers, Tantalus Smith and 
Floyd James, who were also 
nominated. 

Sigma Tau Delta 

The next meeting of Sigma 
Tau Delta will be held at 7 pm 
on Wednesday Feb. 2. Check 
our bulletin board for details. 
All members are urged to 
bring their entries for the 
contests described on the 
bulletin board. 



Sigma Kappa 



Congratulations to Monica 
Aucoin, Lola Boone, Rose 
Mary Brent, Shannon Conner, 
Ann Fleming, Brenda Foster, 
Trisha Galjour, Debbie 
Gardner, Tammy Cremillion. 
Judi Humphrey, Tina Miguez, 
Marjoree Mike, Noelle Orze, 
Carla Roberts, Gina 
Rousseaux, Beth Sandiford, 
Kim Toilet, Jodi Werfal and 
alum initiate Ghlee Wood- 
worth, who were initiated into 
Sigma Kappa on Saturday, 
January 15, 1983. Following 
initiation Delta Mu held a 
banquet in the Cane River 
Room of the Student Union 
for our new active sisters. Our 
chapter was very privileged to 
have Mrs. Carol Orze as the 
guest speaker at our banquet. 
We were pleased to have many 
alums attend our ceremonies 
and activities during initiation. 
Various pledge awards were 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 7 



Applications Now Being 
Accepted for SAUCE... 



Application for the position 
of Editor of Current Sauce for 
Summer and Fall of 1983 as 
well as Spring of 1984 will be 
accepted until February 8, 
1983, according to Dr. 
Christine Ford, chairperson of 
the Student Publications 
Committee. 

Any interested student 
should write a letter of intent 
to Dr. Ford, Language 
Department. The letter 
should state the desire to serve 
as editor and include a 
description of qualifications in 



presented that evening. 
Sunshine award went to Gina 
Rousseax, Jodi Werfal, Rose 
Mary Brent, and Tammy 
Gremillion; Best Pledge award 
to Monica Aucoin; 
Scholarship award to Beth 
Sandiford; and Intramural 
award to Noelle Orze. On 
Sunday, the chapter ended the 
initiation activities with 
morning church services at the 
First Baptist Church. 
On Monday night, January 
« 17, Sigma Kappa made the 
runthrough for the Demon 
basketball game. 
Congratulations to the 
Demons and Lady Demons 
who were victorious over 
Centenary. We're behind you 
all the way Demons! 

Sigma Kappa is looking 
forward to a successful Spring 
semester. 



education, training and ex- 
perience. 

The letter of intent should 
include names of students who 
would become key members of 
the staff if the applicant is 
appointed editor. 

Dr.. Ford said that an in- 
terested student should refer 
to the Student Handbook for 
more information concerning 
the application and the 
editorship. 

She said that the committee 
will meet to interview ap- 
plicants at 3 D.m., February 9. 



...Potpourri Editor 



Applications for the 
position of editor for the 1984 
volume of the POTPOURRI, 
student yearbook, are being 
accepted until Feb. 8, ac- 
cording to Dr. Christine Ford, 
chairperson of the Student 
PublicationsCommittee. 

An interested student 
should write a letter to Dr. 
Ford, a member of the 
Languages Department 
faculty, stating his/her desire 
to be editor and qualifications. 

The letter should include 
names of students who would 



be key members of the staff if 
the applicant is appointed 
editor. 

Dr. Ford said that an in- 
terested student should refer 
to the Student Handbook for 
more infomation concerning 
the application and the 
editorship. 

She said the committee will 
meet to interview applicants at 
3 p.m. Feb. 9. 

After being appointed, the 
new staff will begin work 
immediately on the 1983-1984 
yearbook. 



Panhellenic Begins Rush 



Panhellenic Spring Rush 
began Monday, Jan. 17 and 
will continue until Friday, 
Feb. 4. Members from 
various sororities worked in 
Iberville and the Student 
Union lobby on Jan. 17-18 
signing up girls in order to 
have "name banks," or lists 
of those interested in going 
Greek. 

"Panhellenic thought it 
would be helpful to have 
names to pull from and we 
figured we would get more 
response this way," said 
Kathy Carroll, Program 
Advisor. Nine girls have 
signed up thus far. 

It was decided at the 
Panhellenic meeting on Jan. 
19 to have a "continuous open 



bidding" situation in which 
sororities can give bids "at 
their own discretion." This 
policy and the "name blanks" 
are both new spring rush 
ideas. 

Although it is not man- 
datory to register for informal 
rush, you may do so in room 
214 of the Student Union 
anytime from 8:00 a.m. -4:30 
p.m. Monday-Friday. The 
dates and times of rush parties 
are also listed there. 



Studio Apartment 
For Rent 

Ideal for graduate student. 
Within walking distance of 
NSU. For information phone 
352 5223. 



The Sub-Machine 
Sandwich Shop 

NOW DELIVERS! 

Submarine Sandwiches and a 
full line of Italian food. 

Delivery Hrs. Mon.-Thurs. 4-9 pm 

Fri.-Sat. 4-1 2 pm 
582 Front St. Phone 352-91 34 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 8 



Joe Stamey Elected Kappa 
Sigma National Man- 
Of-The-Year 



Orze to Chair Board of Directors 



Joe Stamey of Nat- 
chitoches, a senior accounting 
major at Northwestern is the 
recipient of the 1982 Hamilton 
W. Baker Award as Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity's national 
undergraduate "man of the 
year." 

The prestigious honor for 
Stamey, past grand master of 
ceremonies of NSU's Theta- 
Mu chapter of Kappa Sigma, 
carries with it a $2,000 each 
award from the Kappa Sigma 
Endowment Fund. 

The NSU senior, who was 
one of several hundred Kappa 
Sigma members at colleges 
and universities in the United 
States and Canada nominated 
for the honor, will have his 
name engraved on the award 
plaque which is permanently 
displayed at the national 
fraternity's memorial 
headquarters in Charlot- 
tesville, Va. 



9r 

In addition to his fraternity 
activities at NSU, Stamey is 
currently serving his second 
term as president of the 
university's Student Govern- 
ment Association. He is also 
the state's student 
representative on the Board of 
Trustees for Louisiana 
Colleges and Universities. 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Owen Stamey and a 1979 
graduate of St. Mary's High 
School, Stamey is chairman of 
the Student Advisory Council, 
president of Phi Eta Sigma 
National Honor Society and a 
member of Phi Kappa Phi 
National Academic Honor 
Society. 

He served as freshman class 
senator, senator-at-large and 
president pro tempore before 
being elected in the spring of 
1982 to his first term as SGA 
president. He won re-election 
last spring. 



NSU Receives Lignite Grant 



Two scientists at Nor- 
thwestern have received a 
$27,585 grant from the 
Louisiana Board of Regents' 
research and development 
program to study the wet 
combustion of lignite. 

Conducting the one-year 
investigation of a new process 
for utilizing lignite as an 
energy source are Dr. Edward 
Graham, dean of the College 
of Science and Technology, 
and Dr. Wayne Hyde, 
chairman of the Department 
of Chemistry, Physics and 
Geology. 

Graham, a nationally- 
known chemist who has 
conducted extensive research 
on the wet oxidation of coal, 
explained that in the proposed 
process, "Lignite suspended in 
water is oxidized with air at 
high pressure, preventing 



cooling by evaporation." 

The NSU dean, who is 
directing the research project 
which will involve several 
students, said that determining 
the reaction conditions will be 
the primary concern of the 
investigation. 

"For this to work," he said, 
"we have to determine the 
right conditions for 
processing. Temperature, 
slurry concentration and 
pressure are some of the 
conditions we must consider." 

According to Graham, the 
study, which is being con- 
ducted in cooperation with the 
Lignite Research and 
Development Institute at 
Northwestern, will provide 
information "to test the 
economic feasibility of the 



Northwestern president Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze has been 
elected to a two-year term as 
chairman-elect of the board of 
directors for the American 
Association of State Colleges 
and Universities. 

Orze, who has been 
president of NSU since June 1 , 
will hold the office until 
1 November of 1984, when he 
will assume the chairmanship 
of the AASCU. Northwestern 
is one of 354 state colleges and 
universities which hold 
membership in the national 
association. 

Orze was one of 11 college 
and university presidents from 
across the nation elected to 
terms on the AASCU 's board 
of directors during the 
organization's recent annual 
meeting in Nashville, Tenn. 

Orze has been a member of 
the AASCU's board of , 

Travel Film To 
Be Presented 

"The Gates of Jerusalem," 
the second in a continuing 
series of travel and adventure 
films sponsored by the 
Division of continuing 
Education and community 
service at NSU will be shown 
Sunday, January 30 at 2:00 
p.m. in Kyser Auditorium. 

Four more shows will be 
presented during the year in- 
cluding, "Scandinavian 
Summer", Mysterious 
Maylands," and "Suprising 
Switzerland." 

The film package is $15 for 
non-students and $7.50 for 
non-students, or $1.50 per 
film at the door. 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Kditor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 



Advertising Manager 
1'harlenc Klvcrs 



Business Manager 
David Saviors 



News Kditor 
Lisa Williams 



Co-Focus Kditor 
Beatrice Dawson 



Co-Focus Kditor 
Pat Skidmore 



Asst. News Kditor 
Diana Gratton 



Circulation Managft 
Dean Napoli 



Sports Kditor 
John Cunningham 



Photographer 
Melanie Daigle 



Advisor 
Frank Presson 





NSU 




BOOKSTORE 


Spring Semester Special 










NSU 






Long -Sleeve 
Demon 




i 


T-Shirts 






MO 95 


A\ 


Jt/ 






<Ty Get Em While They Last! \p 



directors since 1978. He as 
elected to the board while 
serving as president of 
Worcester State College in 
Massachusetts, the position he • 
held for seven years before his 
selection as NSU's 15th 
president. 

Northwestern' s president, 
who is recognized nationally 
as an art historian and 
sculptor, has served on 
AASCU committees on in- 
ternational programs, cultural 
affairs, athletics and 
humanities. 

Earlier this year, Orze led a 
five-member delegation to 
Poland to finalize, an 
educational exchange 
agreement between the 
AASCU and the Polish 
Ministry of Science, Higher 
Education and Technology. 
He was also chairman of the 
delegation to Poland in 1980 
which established the ex- 



cnange agreement. 

Orze, who has been active ii 
international higher educatioi 
programs since becoming a 
college president, was also a 
delegate fro the AASCU's 
educational good will visit to 
the National Republic 
China in 1978. 

President of Worcester Stae 
from 1975 until his election as 
NSU's chief executive in 
December of 1982, Orze holds 
bachelor and master's degrees 
from Syracuse University and 
a doctorate in higher 
education from George 
Peabody College. 

He was dean of the College 
of Fine and Applied Arts at 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
University for six years and 
served for one year as acting 
dean of the faculty and interim 
treasurer at the institution 
before becoming president of 
Worcester State. 



I^CITY BANK 
r & TRUST CO 

Serving NSU students with their convenient 
College Avenue location and the low 
service charge of $ 5 per yr. for all students. 



STUDENT 
CHECKING 
ACCOUNT 

Per Month 
Service Charge 



Receive a regular 
monthly statement 
PLUS 

Be eligible to receive an 
OTTO/Xtra Services card. 

Used at 45 locations 
throughout the state. 



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NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA Member FDIC 




Demons 



Lady Demons 



ft 



Sports,— 



ft s\tf* batt January 25, 1983 
VV Page 9 



Lady Demons Outscore Lamar 



Stuff 

by Joe Cunningham 

The Demons and Lady 
Demons Need Your Support 

Saturday night at 5:45 the Northwestern Lady Demons 
downed the Lamar Lady Cardinals 68-62 in an exciting game 
that wasn't over until it was over. Five hundred people showed 
up for that game according to the official score sheet. I counted 
212. 

At 8:00 that same night, the NSU Demons played the Mercer 
Bears. Mercer came into the game undefeated in the Trans 
America Athletic Conference. The very same conference that 
NSU competes in. Officially 1175 people showed up for that 
one. That figure was probably close to 406. 

What I don't understand is this: What ELSE is there to do on 
a Saturday night in Natchitoches? 

The Student Body, Booj angles, Plantation, or anything else 
doesn't start juking at 5:45. And you know as well as I do that 
the only people out at 8:00 are the high school kids who drive the 
strip. 

Right now, the Lady Demons are playing ball with the top 
teams in the country. They lost to two top twenty teams by less 
than 10 points. One of those teams lost to La. Tech in the 
women's basketball FINALS last year. And they only beat our 
tady Demons by eight points. The other was the University of 
Alabama and they're ranked something like 19. 

At Stephen F. Austin, a team that has been consistently 
ranked in the top twenty the last several years, the Lady Demons 
were actually playing against six competitors. The starting five 
girls for SFA were tough enough, but the students at Stephen F. 
Austin came out en massse for the game and heckled the mess 
out of the Lady Demons. And don't let anyone tell you that 
heckling doesn't mess up your concentration out there. It does. 

The NSU men are starting to play the kind of ball that won 
them second place in the TAAC last year. The 4-11 recrod is 
deceiving. They lost to Mississippi State of the Southeastern 
Conference and they lost a pair of games to Houston Baptist, 
'he only team in the TAAC that is still unbeaten in conference 
Play. And they lost most of their games when they were without 
the services of Johnny Martin, a pre-season all-conference pick. 

The Demons have now won four out of their last five games 
and appear to have the momentum building them up to the 
conference tournament in late February. But they, and the Lady 
Demons, need you support desperately. A good heckling section 
's worth at LEAST 10-12 points. And don't tell me that you 
don't know what to say. I read the bathroom walls. 

Don't try to fool anybody. You have nothing else better to do 
than come out and support our basketball teams. Don't tell me 
that you're studying either because you and I both know better. 

The play this Thursday night at 7:30, and they play a very 
8ood Samford University team. The Lady Demons play tonight 
(Tuesday) against the Southeastern Lady Lions. So please, go 
0u t there and heckle; support your teams and give the other guys 
°n the other teams a real bad time. You'll feel better for it. I 
Knpwjdg. 



Current Sauce 



Currcnc Sauce it th, official niinranm of 
"»> « Natchitoches, Loaasiasvi Tlx 



Iht'Tfll^. L'.?" aal ** **ond dan aufler at 
^ctTfin^ ' CHr,ccr «"*"■*•«<* 



with 



(Qa> — - " — • ™™ »fi Has MHUK1 Will 

bSSSL? and testing period. 

•fcU^ii business office, of ike Sauce 
•suildta? tJIT*" 2U - ** d 

Md^J*f* tt,b ?*P"<>ns «« U yearly. 
th7o^^''? n, <■* fin. summer Usi 



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Saucc. and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. NaidiiiodMS. Louisiana. TI4S7. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns arr 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions arc solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
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Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
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Send postal form number J579 to Current 
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71457. 



Northwestern's Lady 
Demons survived their worst 
shooting night of the season 
making only 33 percent of 
their shots from the field, and 
still downed the Lady Car- 
dinals of Lamar University 68- 
62 before a small crowd in 
Prather Coliseum Saturday 
nght. 

Although the Lady Demons 
had trouble scoring from the 
ouside, they hung tough by 
making 21 of 33 free throws 
for the evening. 

The Lady Demons started 
the scoring on a Tracy Taylor 
18 foot jump shot, and ex- 
panded that to a four point 
lead on a Kim Paulk steal and 
assist to Stephany Washington 
who made the layup. Moments 
later Teressa made a three 
point play and the Lady 
Demons were seemingly in 
command at 7-2. 

The rest of the half was 
pretty even as both teams took 
turns missing shots and 
throwing the ball away. 

The Lady Cardinals pulled 
to within one point of the 
Lady Demons when Coleen 
Solseth scored on her own 
rebound. The Lady Demons 
hung tough from then on 
however, and denied the Lady 
Cardinals a basket after the 
2:17 mark of the initial half. 

It looked like the Lady 
Demons would run away with 
the game in the second half, 
increasing their lead to 13 
points with 10 minutes to play, 
but missed shots let the Lady 
Cardinals move to within two 
points, 55-53, with an even 
four minutes to go. 

Paulk made a key bucket to 
put NSU up by four and after 
a missed shot, the Lady 
Cardianls were forced to" start 
fouling the Lady Demons. 



Intramurals offer more in 
the way of activities than 
anything else at this 
university. Go by and 
sign up for one today! 



Babies 
Don't Thrive 
in 

Smoke-filled 
Wombs 




When You're 

Pregnant, 
Do n't Smo kel 

Support the 

March of Dime! 



(g)Mc 



BIRIH Di'ECIS (OUNOAllONi 



The NSU female basket- 
bailers were up to the occasion 
making their last eight straight 
free throw attempts. Paulk hit 
four straight and Washington 
and Taylor each canned two to 
put the game out of reach. 

Taylor capped an out- 
standing week ->f basketball by 
scoring 23 po. .ts and hauling 
in six rebounds. Paulk added 



12 points and seven rebounds 
to go wth four assists, while 
Washington and Lonnie 
Banks each made 10 points. 
Washington also managed six 
rebounds and Banks handed 
out four assists on the night. 
Banks also picked up six 
important steals and Thomas 
added three more for the Lady 
Demon cause. 




Stephany Washington goes up for two more points 
during a recent Lady Demons basketball game. The 
Lady Demons are undefeated at home with a 5-0 
record going into tonights game against the 
Southeastern University Lady Lions. Tipoff time is 
7:30, students get in free with NSU I.D. 




We Sell Jenson, Maxell, Alpine, 
Memorex, Allsop and many more 
name brands. 

University Shopping Mart 
352-8077 



The Current Sauce, January 25, 1983, Page 10 



Lady Demons Crush Centenary 75-55 in Team Effort 



Katie Harris hit a 15-foot 
jumper with just 28 seconds- 
left to play to put the final nail 
in the coffin as the Lady 
Demons buried the Centenary 
Lady's basketball team 
Monday night in a standout 
team effort, 75-55. The Lady 
Demons were in command the 
whole way, totally dominating 
Centenary despite a rather 
sloppily played first half. 

Stephany Washington led 
the way for the Lady Demons 
with 17 points and she was 
followed closely by freshman 
point guard Teressa Thomas 
who sank eight of 15 shots for 
16 points. Also hitting double 
figures for the Lady Demons 



were Tracy Taylor who hit 14 
points and Lonnie Banks who 
canned 10. 

It took a while for the Lady 
Demons to get untracked, they 
only scored four points in the 
first five and a half minutes 
and were losing 6-4, before 
they scored seven straight to 
take the lead they never 
relinquished. Taylor, who had 
scored the Lady Demons first 
four points, added four more 
and Washington made a free 
throw and Thomas sank a 
layup after another Banks 
assist during the spurt. Taylor 
scored all of her 14 points in 
the first half. The Lady 
Demons went in to the 



lockerroom with a 37-22 
halftime lead. 

Banks started the the second 
half by sinking a layup off the 
opening tip and then Paulk 
added a free throw and 
Thomas arched a long one 
from 20 feet to put the Lady 
Demons in front 42-23. The 
Lady Demons hit their biggest 
lead of the night at 25 points 
on another one of Lonnie 
Banks' amazing passes, this 
one again to Thomas, to go 
ahead 71-46. That assist was 
one of six for Banks while Kim 
Paulk handed out five and 
Thomas added four of her 
own for the Lady Demon 
cause. 



Banks also grabbed a game 
high 12 rebounds to com- 
pliment an outstanding all 
around performance. Taylor 
and Washington shared 
second place honors with six 



caroms apiece, while Val 
Williams pulled down five. 
Lady Demon Tandra Lewis 
was a perfect two for two from 
the field before being sidelined 
with a knee injury early in the 
ballgame. 



Lady Demons Fall To 
SFA In Physical Contest 




Tracy Taylor's career high 
32 points and 10 rebounds 
weren't enough ' to offset a 
very physical charge by the 
highly regarded Stephen F. 
Austin Lady Lumberjacks in a 
game played Thursday night in 
Nacogdoches. 

In a game that saw Stephany 
Washington injuring her hand 



again and a defensive strategy 
that consisted of flagrant 
pushing and shoving, the 
outsized Lady Demons 
couldn't overcome the inside 
strength of the Lady Lum- j 
berjacks. 

Head coach Pat Pierson ' 
said the Lady Demons just | 
couldn't get untracked on the f 
(Continued on Page 11) 




THE 
STUDENT 
BODY 



Now open of the private use of 
NSU Students and Friends 
from 7 pm - 2 am. 

$ 2.00 cover charge 

Fri. & Sat. 1 

HAPPY HOUR 

Wed. -Fr., Jan. 26-28 1 
5 pm-8 pm 

All Bar Drinks 2 for 1 

Collared shirts must be worn. 
No frayed or faded jeans allowed. 

COME PARTY 
WITH US! 



s 



The Current Sauce. January 25. 1983. Page 11 



Demons Upset Mercer In T AAC Matchup 

Rrian Tnlivette hit four ■ • .rr i_: i »_ * 



Brian Jolivette hit four 
clutch free throws in the final 
23 seconds to give the NSU 
Demons a 65-61 upset of the 
Mercer University Bears in a 
Trans America Athletic 
Conference game. 

With the ballgame tied at 
57, Northwestern went into a 



slow down offense designed to 
force the other the Bears to 
give a lay up. The Demons 
effectively ran that offense for 

1:18 before Kenny Hale snuck 
past a sleeping defense for the 
layup that gave the Demons 
the lead at 59-57. 



Johnny Martin stole the in- aga j n xhis time he calmly 
bounds pass and fed Hale who san k both ends of the one and 



In Nacogdoches 

NSU-SFA continued 



(Continued from Page 10) 
evening. "It got very physical 
and we got away from our 
game plan. We were running 
early and didn't want to." 

The Ladies fell behind 42-22 
at halftime and were foced to 
come out running in the 
second half. And that's when 
Pierson says they started 
playing good ball. "We had to 
run and we did it well, and ' 
then Stephany got hurt." 

The Lady Demons closed 
the 20' point gap to nine points 
with just under eight minutes 
to go in the game, but SFA 
outscored the Lady Demons 
10-4 to put the game just out 
of reach. 

James Smith, the Lady 
Demons assistant coach said 
the defense didn't play bad, 
and that the Ladies played 
well in the second half. "We 
just can't put two consistent 
halves of basketball 



together," he said, noting that 
the Lady Demons shot 36 
percent from the field in the 
first half compared to 62 
percent in the second half. 

Pierson also noted, "We're 
not playing well until we get 10 
points down. If we could get 
the girls to think that they're 
10 points down when we start 
the game we would do alot 
better." 

The home court advantage 
for SFA also had alot to do 
with the outcome. The SFA 
backers were a very vocal 
group and pressured the Lady 
Demons a little bit. 

In addition to Taylor's 32 
points, Lonnie Banks canned 
18 and grabbed seven 
rebounds in another brilliant 
performance for the freshman 
guard. Kim Paulk added 1 1 
points and three assists while 
Teressa Thomas dished out 
five assists. 



Demon Playground 



The intramural 1-on-l 
basketball tournament was 
held on Wednesday of last 
week at the Intramural 
building with both men's and 
women's divisions. 

14 participants signed up for 
the event in the women's 
division. In the first round, 
cindy Duke and Renee 
Richard received byes to the 
second round. 

Liz McCollister defeated 
Angela Lasyone, and Debbie 
Gardner beat Lisa Lofton, 
while Lynn Clary downed 
Stacy maddox. Also in the 
first round, Cindy Wigley set 
back Jo Tatum. Syd Forrester 
bowed to Jenny Johnson, and 
Sheila Dowden thwarted 
Jlonna Box. 



The men had 28 contestants 
in the first round of their 
competition, with David 
Thrash, Mike Turner, Peter 1 
Francisco, and David Berg 
getting free passes to die 
second round. 

Jeff Fonda handled Eddie 
McDugle, and Keith 
Washington got past David 
Nardini. Ehrett McClain had 
no trouble with Sydney 
Williams. Don Hill also 
advanced to the second round, 
as he toppled Kirk Popovich. 

Gerald Spencer easd by 
John Cunningham, while 
Frank Sisson and Teddy 
Johnson defeated Jerry 
Chellette and Greg Patterson 
respectively. Donald Bihm 
(Continued on Page 12) 



CARL MEANS OWNER 



Natchitoches 
& Spcrts & Trophy 

PHONE 318/352-9188 
617 BOSSIER STREET • NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 71457 



Panhellenic Sorority Rush 
Now In Progress 

Jan. 17- Feb. 4 

Sign up in Rm 214 of the Student Union from 8 



got another layup to put NSU 
up by four. Mercer scored 
again and then foulded 
Jolivette, forcing the Demon 
guard to the line for two free 
throws. Jolivette cooly 
responded by banking in both 
of them and the Demons 
resumed their four point lead. 

Tony Gattis scored two 
quickly for the Bears and 
again Jolivette was fouled as 
he brought the ball upcourt 
for NSU. This time he missed 
the first shot of a one and one 
free throw but grabbed his 
own rebound and was fouled 



one to give the Demons the 65- 
61 victory. 

The game started off the 
way it ended, close. The 
largest lead of the first half 
belonged to the Demons and 
they had that five point lead 
on two occassions. Five 
minutes into the game Mercer 
was called for goaltending a 
Johnny Martin shot. NSU led 
9-4. With 40 seconds left in 
the first half NSU again went 
up by five when Harry Francis 
fed Hale with a short pass, and 
Hale layed it in. 

The second half was much 



the same as the first half with 
Mercer scoring 10 of the first 
13 points and taking a quick 
lead 37-33. Hovwever. the 

Demons came right back and 
scored eight straight points to 
take the lead they never 
relinqusihshed. 

Northwestern was led by 
Martin's 23 points and seven 
rebounds while Hale hit 18 
markers. Francis picked up 
six important rebounds and 
dished out four assists, while 
being credited with seven 
steals for the Demons. Calvin 
Madlock had a game high six 
assists for Northwestern. 



Demon Basketball 




Coming At Ya' 

Next Thursday Jan. 27 vs. Samford 
Home Saturday Jan. 29 vs. Ga. Southern 
Game: Tuesday Feb. 1 vs NLU 



The «"nrn-nt Sauce, January 25. 1983, Page 12 

More M , 

Demon Playground... 



Grappe Receives Latino Memorial Award 



(( onlinuiO from pa ye- II) 

fcH lo Ronnie Howell. 

Also in the first round Craig 
Corder edged by Mark 
Thigpen. In his first game, 
Mike Camden ended up on the 
short end of the score to Dean 
Napoli, as Jim Holdcn also 
lost to Ciene Stockton. And 
Rodney Thrash outplayed 
Dwayne Poc. 

In the second round of 
competition Liz McCollister 
hung on to score a victory over 
Cindy Duke, lo advance lo the 
semi-finals in the women's 
bracket. 

I.ynn Clary overpowered 
Debbie Gardner, and Jenny 
Johnson outplayed Cindy 
Wigley. In the last game of 
the night for I lie women, 
shiela Dowden downed Renee 
Richard. 

Jeff I'onda gol past David 
Thrash in the men's second 
round opener. Keith 
Washington squeeked by 



Hhrett McClain, while uon 
Hill succumed to Gerald 
Spencer. Frank Sisson also 
advanced to the next round by 
beatting Mike Turner. 

Teddy Johnson flogged 
Peter Francisco, and Craig 
Corder slipped by Ronnie 
Howell. Gene Stocklon 
helped himself with a narrow 
win over- Dean Napoli. 
Rodney Thrash kepi his hopes 
alive with a victory over David 
Berg. 

In the third round, Fonda 
beat Washington, and Spencer 
whipped Sisson. Also ad- 
vancing to the semi-finals were 
Johnson and Thash, with 
victories over Corder and 
I Slock I on respectively. 

The semi-final games will be 
played at halftime of the Lady 
Demons' and Demons' games 
on February lOih. The finals 
will be played al halftime of 
the Lady Demons' contest 
against Stephen F. Austin on 
February 26th. 



Demons Edge Gents By Two 



Harry Francis sank two 
clutch free throws with 37 
seconds left in the game to give 
Northwestern the edge it 
needed to down the visiting 
Centenary Gents 77-75 in an 
exciting Trans America 
Athletic Conference game 
played at Pralher Coliseum. 

Francis' free throws came 
after he was fouled in- 
tentionally by Centenary's 
Eric Woodard, and it gave (he 
Demons a 77-70 lead. Cen- 
tenary's try at a comeback fell 
shorl and the first of two 
TAAC games involving these 
two teams ended in a Demon 
win. 

The score was tied at 10-10 
when Centenary reeled off 13 
points to NSU's three and 
took a 23-13 lead. Nor- 
thwestern came right back and 
outscored the Gents 14-3 to 
take a one point lead with 4: 14 
left on the first half clock. 

But the first half proved to 
be a half of streaks as Cen- 
tenary reeled off seven straight 
points to move in front 33-27 
with two minutes left. Finally 
it was Northwestern's turn to 
rally and they scored eight of 
the final 10 points, including 
the last two on a Brian 
Jolivette clutch shot at the 
buzzer to tie the game 35 all. 

The second half was con- 
trolled by Northwestern from 
the start. Johnny Martin hit a 



turn around jumper on the 
baseline just seconds into the 
final half to give the Demons 
the lead they never 
relinquished. 

Madlock led the Demons in 
both scoring and rebounds 
with 27 points and 10 boards 
on the night. Martin, Francis, 
Hale, and Grays all con- 
tributed 10 points to the 
Demons win, and Martin 



Senior defensive end 
David Grappe received the 
Lester Latino Award for his 
play during his career at 
Northwestern, and he was 
honored during halftime 
ceremonies at the Nor- 
thwestern vs. Centenary 
basketball game 

The award, which was 
established this season for the 
first time, is named in honor 
of the former Northwestern 
State standout football player 
who was killed in an 
automobile accident in 1981. 

The award will be given to a 
Demon football player each 
year who demonstates the 
courage, teamwork, 
dedication and desire to excel 
in which Lester Latino 
exemplified during his 
football career at Nor- 
thwestern. 

Grappe, a native of 
Haughton who was a four- 
year starter for the Demons as 
his defensive end position, led 
the team in tackles this past 
season as Northwestern posted 
a 7-4 mark. Grappe was 
named as Permanent 
Defensive Captain following 
the season and was named to 
the second unit on the 
Louisiana Sports Writers 
Association all-stale team. 
Along with being a standout 
football player, Grappe is also 
a starter on the Demon 
baseball team. 

Latino was a team 



added eight rebounds and five captain his final two years as a 

assists to his stats. A. J. Demon and earned all- 

"Awesome Jam" Culbreath conference honors both as a 

dished out five assists for the junior and again during his 

Demon cause. final season. 



Organizations! 

All organizations 
which have changed 
officers, by laws, etc., 
need to update their 
organizations cards in 
the Student Union 
office. 




In fht> t'.irly days of electricity, these words were 
displayed in rooms equipped with the new Ed- 
ison Elec trie Light Bulbs lx>c ause people thought 
they were unsafe. Some people feel that same 
way about nuc lear power today. But after more 
than 25 years of commerc ial experienc e, not a 
single member of the public has been injured by 
the operation of a nuclear power plant. An un- 
matched safety record. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

I <-iiti.il I miiM.m.i I Uh Im, ( itmp.im < ,ull M.tli". I 'tiding 
l <Hii|i.im I musi.in.i Ckvh \ I ight t timp.im New ( tilcuv. I'uliln 
Sw\m*, In* StKiilmcsttf ii lU'i ini Print 1 ! ( imfMin 




Northwestern State's David Grappe is shown" 
receiving the first annual Lester Latino Memorial 
Award at a recent Demon basketball game. Grappe, 
a standout defensive end for the Demons, is pictured 
with Larry Gandet, former teammate, Mr. and Mrs. 
Pete Latino and Junior Matheu, long-time friend. 



The Health & Physical Education Department 
will give special exams Monday, February 21, 
1983 at 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. in the PE 
Majors Building. 

The following classes will begin March 15, 1983: 
PE 024,01 - Bait and Fly Casting - Gentry - 3:00 TT 
89/113 

PE 026,46 - Bowling - 5-8 TT 77/144 



NSU 
STUDENTS 

We've Got What It Takes 
To Get You In Shape 




Nautilus Thigh Extension 
Machine 

Call About 
Special Student Rates 

BODY WORLD 
HEALTH CLUB 

234 Keyser Ave. Natchitoches, La. 
Phone 357-9560 




urrent 




auce 




Vol. LXX No. 16 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 



February 1, 1983 



Dr. Rene Bienvenu, NSU's 
14th President, Succumbs 



Dr. Rene J. Bienvenu, 
NSU's, 14th president before 
retiring this past summer, died 
Thursday morning at 7:14 
a.m. in a Shreveport hospital. 
Dr. Bienvenu was 59. 

Dr. Bienvenu served NSU as 
president from 1978 until June 
1, 1982. He was appointed 
president of NSU in 1977 by 
the Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities succeeding Dr. 
Arnold Kilpatrick who retired 
February 1, 1978. 

Dr. Bienvenu was a faculty 
member and administrator for 
27 years before becoming 
NSU's president. Dr. 
Bienvenu was dean of the 
College of Science and 
Technology at Northwestern 
for 10 years and was chairman 
of the NSU Department of 
Microbiology from 1960 to 
1967. 

In recognition of his 32 
years of service to Nor- 
thwestern and his five years as 
the institution's president, the 
Board of Trustees last month 
named Dr. Bienvenu President 
Emeritus of NSU. 

A nationally-known 
scientific researcher and 
writer, Dr. Bienvenu served 
Northwestern from 1950 until 
his retirement except for a 
brief period in 1977 when he 
was assistant dean of the 
School of Allied Health at the 
Louisiana State University 
Medical Center in Shreveport, 
the position he held when he 
w as appointed president of 
NSU. 

A native of Colfax, 
Bienvenu served as a 
microbiologist at Confederate 
Memorial Hospital in 
Shreveport and as a chemist 
for Leland Hamner Company 
in Houston before joining the 
Northwestern faculty. 

Dr. Bienvenu earned the 
B.S. degree in zoology from 
Louisiana State University in 
•944 and the M.S. degree in 
bacteriology from LSU in 
'949. He received his doc- 
torate in microbiology from 

m University of Texas in 
1957. 

Bienvenu also studied at 
tne University of Penn- 
sv 'vania, Cornell University, 
* n d the Oak Ridge Institute 
Nuclear Studies and served 




Dr. Rene Bienvenu 

as a visiting professor at the 
University of Texas. 

Research conducted by Dr. 
Bienvenu over the years 
received nationwide attention 
through the publication of 
numerous articles for scientific 
and scholarly journals. 

Dr. Bienvenu's tenure here 
at NSU was highlighted by the 
establishment of programs 
and priorities designed to 
enhance academic standards at 
NSU. The NSU master of 
science program in 
microbiology received a 
commendation of excellence 
from the Louisiana Board of 
Regents for Higher Education 
during his term, and his 
former students established a 
special microbiology award in 
his honor 

During his term, the Lignite 
Research and Development 
Institute, NSU Press, 
Louisiana Folklife Center and 
the Center for the History of 
Louisiana Education were 
developed. Normal Hill on 
the NSU campus was placed 
on the National Register for 
Historic Places. 

Bienvenu was instrumental 
in obtaining some $25 million 
for facilities during his 
presidency 

Dr. Bienvenu was survived 
by his widow, Mrs. Catherine 
Nelken Bienvenu, of Nat- 
chitoches; his father, Rene J. 
Bienvenu Sr., of Natchitoches; 
three children, Mrs. Clay 
Franklin of Memphis, Tenn., 
Elizabeth Bienvenu of 
Marshall, Texas, and Dr. 
Steven N. Bienvenu of 
Shreveport; and three 
grandchildren. 



Treen Exempts Northwestern 
From State Budget Cuts 



At a Tuesday luncheon in 
the Student Union Ballroom, 
Governor Dave Treen an- 
nounced that Northwestern 
would be exempt from the 4.4 
percent budget cut that af- 
fected universities in the state. 

Saying top quality 
education was a prerequisite 
for every advancement made 
in the state, Treen made his 
announcement while reporting 
on the recent Special Session^ 
of the Legislature. 

The budget cut would have 
meant $743,000 less that 
Northwestern would have to 
operate on in the next fiscal 
year. Of that amount, 
$543,000 is being restored and 
$280,000 will be put in the 
budget for design and 
engineeringwork to rebuild 
Caldwell Hall, which burned 
in October. 

In his address, Treen also 
mentioned the new Louisiana 
High School for Math, 
Science, and the Arts that will 
open on the NSU campus this 
fall for talented high school 
students. 

"This should help those 
who can be challenged to 
greater achievement," he 
stated and then added, "It's 
going to cost some money, but 
it will be worth it." 

The Chamber of Commerce 
sponsored the luncheon that 
drew a big crowd which was 
welcomed by Natchitoches 
Mayor Joe Sampite and NSU 
president Dr. Joseph Orze. 
Bill Cross, president of the 
Chamber of Commerce in- 
troduced the guests and asked 
Senator Don Kelly and 
Representative Jimmy Long to 
introduce the governor. 

Long expressed the ap- 



preciation of Natchitoches and 
Northwestern for the help 
which Governor Treen has 
given us. "We've called on 
him and he has come 
through," the Natchitoches 
representative said. 

NSU President Dr. Joseph 
Orze said that the exemption 
was necessarv because the 



university is operating on a 
"very bareboncs" budget. 

"We're going to balance the 
budget and work it out. But 
ii's going to be very, very 
tight. ..the problems lhai the 
university got into didn'i 
happen overnight, and they're 
no) going to be solved oer- 
n'tglit:" Orze said. 



Luv The Gov 




Governor Dave Treen spoke on the NSU campus last 
Wednesday about Northwestern's exemption from 
the 4.4 percent state-mandated budget cuts. He also 
talked about the recent special session of lhe 
Louisiana Legislature. 



LSUS Chancellor Upset With Treen's Decision 



Dr. Grady Bogue, chan- 
cellor of Louisiana State 
University in Shreveport said 
Wedn esday that he wants a 
public explanation of why 
Governor Dave Treen 
exempted NSU from the 4.4 
percent cutback in state funds. 

Dr. Bogue said the 
governor's decision to give 
back a large portion of the 
state-mandated cutback "has 
not been easy for us (the LSUS 
faculty) to understand." 



Bogue demanded a public- 
explanation of the reasons 
behind the move to give back 
$543,000 of the 743,000 that 
was supposed to be cut from 
state allocations to Nor- 
thwestern. 

Bogue said, "I think the 
most important thing for most 
of us concerned is to get the 
full story. It has the ap- 
pearance of a political action 
with no facts made public to 
support it. If there are 
reasons, I think they ought to 



be ^stated, so folks could 
understand why they were 
exempted and we were not." 

Bogue went on to say, 
"Two conclusions now seem 
possible, one... is that we were 

not sufficiently aggressive in 
making our needs known to 
the governor. The second is 
that there were some ex- 
tenuating circumstances 
related to the management of 
Northwestern that justified 
special consideration. 



PFM 

YOUR PROFESSIONAL 
FOOD MANAGEMENT SERVICE 
AT NORTHWESTERN 



On behalf of the PFM management and staff, I would like to extend a hearty 
Welcome Back!! - to all. 

We look forward to providing improved service and are excited about the 
changes we have made we're certain you'll enjoy them. 

Specifically, we will be offering daily menu specials and a greater variety 
of entrees for your dining enjoyment. 

We would appreciate your comments and suggestions on how we may 
improve our service to you. 



Tta (^xiJ^nt Is.,. 



. . . Htt mo5t important person on the 
campus . ^itwut students tktre would 
be -no "need Jor the vnttitutiwi. 

. . . Not a cold enrollment dafatic but a 
^JieAi and blood human \oewa mtk 
^eeliwjs and emotions iikt our cram. 

. . . Not someone to lot tolerated w that -we 
can do our tktnj. r j)i^j ®& our thizuj. 

... Not dependent on u&, ( ftatker, yft axe 
dependent on them. 

. . . Not an interruption of our work, but 
tke vurvoee of it. We are not 
them ajwor by seem them, 
are doxna u6 a icxvor bu airituj 1V the 
oflxtrtxMtu tolb 60. ° 



l-^Organizations-H 



Phi Mu 

Hi! The Kappa Iota chapter 
of Phi Mu would like to 
welcome everyone back to 
school. Our chapter is very 
excited because we have a 
great Spring semester planned. 

We would like to thank the 
out-going officers of last year 
for a job well done. Also, 
congratulations go the new 
officers for the 1983 year. 
They are: Karen Schallhorn, 
President; Melanie Campbell, 
Vice-President; Cindy Ernst, 
Treasurer; Terri Ellis, Phi 
Director; Angela Champion, 
Parliamentarian; Brenda 
Waggoner, Recording 
Secretary; LeAnn Gray, 
Corresponding Secretary; 
Angela Lasyone, Membership 
Director; and Stacy Farrell, 
Panhellenic Delegate. 

The night of Sunday, the 
23rd, the ladybug house 
entertained a group of fan- 
tastic rushees. Along with 
yummy (and fattening) 
banana splits, we played some 
hilarious games. Special 
thanks go to Angela Lasyone 
for coordinating a fun 
evening. 

Finally, the Sisters of Phi 
Mu offers our condolences to 
the family of Janey Kight, a 
Phi Mu alumni who passed 
away Thursday the 20th. Each 
and everyone of us felt a loss 
because as sisters we share a 
close bond. We ask that you 
please remember Janey in your 
thoughts and prayers. 



PRSSA 

All public relations students 
(majors and minors) will meet 
Wednesday, February 2, 1983, 
in Room 213, Kyser Hall, at 
5:30p.m. 

NSU students from all 
majors are invited to attend 
this meeting. 

Members of the NSU 
Chapter, Public Relations 
Student Society of America, 
who attend will be given 
certificates of membership and 
membership cards. 

The agenda will include 
discussion of a professional 
PR seminar scheduled March 
25, 1983; and a series of eight 
p R seminars to be offered by 
the North Louisiana Chapter, 
Public Relations Society of 
America, Shreveport, 
beginning February 3. 

All of these seminars will be 
of value to NSU students with 
{Majors in advertising, 
bus iness, marketing, ad- 
vertising design, photography, 
broadcasting, etc. 

Information on any of the 
activities can be obtained from 
franklin Presson, room 225- 
fc > Kyser Hall, Phone 5339. 



Tri-Sigma 

Sigma Sigma Sigma would 
like to welcome everyone back 
to school. We have many 
activities and events planned 
for the semester and are 
looking forward to a great 
year under the leadership of 
our new officers. They are: 
President-Stacie Lafitte, Vice 
President-Laurie Weaver, 
Secretary-Eileen Haynes, 
Treasurer-Beth McMillan, 
Education Director-Sonya 
Tevis, and Rush Director- 
Cappy Prudhomme. A great 
big Thanks go to the Kappa 
Sigma's for a great Hobo 
Exchange, we had a blast! 
The Tri-Sigma's are gearing 
up early for Mardi Gras by 
helping out at the annual 
Natchitoches Krewe of St. 
Denis Mardi Gras Ball 
Saturday night. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa started off the 
semester with a Chimney Chat 
at the sorority house on 
January 18, and a Popcorn 
party on January 20. 
Tuesday, January 25, the 
Sigma Kappa sisters had a 
rolling good time at the local 
skating rink. 

Sigma Kappa wishes to 
Congratulate and Welcome to 
our sisterhood our five new 
pledges-Penny Kraft, Fran 
Hanks, Rachelle Williams, 
Ginger Distante, Paula 
Simmons and Terri 
Morehouse. 

We would like to wish all 
sororities and fraternities a 
very successful Spring 
Semester. 

Congratulations to the Lady 
Demons for their successful 
winning streak. We're behind 
you all the way! 



Wesley 



On Wednesday evening, 
Jan. 26, we enjoyed delicious 
Gumbo prepared for us by the 
members of the Provencal 
Church. We were privileged 
to have the Wesley Board of 
Directors and Sam Goodwin 
attend. Goodwin, the new 
NSU head football coach 
talked about the successful 
person and Christinaity. 

"Who Am I, and What Am 
I Doing Here" will be the 
topic in a "Value Clarification 



Workshop" to be held on 
February 2 and 9. These will 
be led by Frances Watkins, 
Director of Special Services 
and will begin with our weekly 
supper at 6:00 p.m. "What 
Revelation Really Reveals" is 
the subject during each 
Sunday evening Bible Study 
held at 8:00 p.m. 

Come Join us: And don't 
forget about our weekly 
prayer breakfast on Tuesdavs 
at 7:00 a.m. 



The Current Same, February 1, 1983, l'aj>e 3 



Applications Now Being 
Accepted for SAUCE... 



Application for the position 
of Editor of Current Sauce for 
Summer and Fall of 1983 as 
well as Spring of 1984 will be 
accepted until February 8, 
1983, according to Dr. 
Christine Ford, chairperson of 
the Student Publications 
Committee. 

Any interested student 
should write a letter of intent 
to Dr. Ford, Language 
Department. The letter 
should state the desire to serve 
as editor and include a 
description of qualifications in 



education, training and ex- 
perience. 

The letter of intent should 
include names of students who 
would become key members of 
the staff if the applicant is 
appointed editor. 

Dr. Ford said (hat an in- 
terested student should refer 
to the Student Handbook for 
more information concerning 
Lhe application and the 
editorship. 

Site said that the committee 
will meet to interview ap- 
plicants at 3 D.m., February 9. 



...Potpourri Editor 



Applications for the 
position of editor for the 1984 
volume of the POTPOURRI, 
student yearbook, are being 
accepted until Feb. 8, ac- 
cording to Dr. Christine Ford, 
chairperson -of the Student 
PublicationsCommittee. 

An interested student 
should write a letter to Dr. 
Ford, a member of the 
Languages Department 
faculty, stating his/her desire 
to be editor and qualifications. 

The letter should include 
names of students who would 



be key members of the staff if 
the applicant is appointed 
editor. 

Dr. Ford said that an in- 
terested student should refer 
to the Student Handbook for 
more infomation concerning 
the application and the 
editorship. 

She said the committee will 
meet to interview applicants at 
3 p.m. Feb. 9. 

After being appointed, the 
new staff will begin work 
immediately on the 1983-1984 
yearbook. 



Alpha Angels 



"What's On Your Mind" 
Featuring Dr. Joe Orze 
Wednesday Night At 8:00 



On 



KNWD 



91.7 



Alpha Angels of Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity Incorporated 
held its first meeting on Jan. 
24, 1983 at 5:00. Services 
projects were discussed and 
officers were elected. The 
following officers are: 
President-Cynthia Daniels 
Vice-President - Jackie 
Murray 

Secretary-/Carolyn Willi- 
ams 



Reporter-Brenda Washing- 
ton 

Treasurer-Evelyn Bell 
Dean of Pledges-Kara 
McGriggs 

Parliamentarian-Ruth Cla- 
yton 

We would also like to say 
Happy Birthday to Angels 
Cynthia Daniels and Evelyn 
Bell on February 5 from your 
Angels sisters. 




Pizzaixuil 

For pizza, out it's Pizza. Inn: 

Phone 352-5750 
1 24 Hwy. 1 South 

NSU STUDENT NIGHT 

Wednesday, 5 pm-Close 

25% DISCOUNT 

ON ALL PURCHASES WITH 
PRESENTATION OF STUDENT ID'S. 



THE 
STUDENT 
BODY 



WEDNESDAY 



HAPPY HOUR 



ALL THE BAR DRINKS YOU 
CAN DRINKS FROM 7 9 PM 

for $ 5 00 

WEDNESDAY SATURDAYS 
(FEB. 2-5) 

2 for 1 DRINKS 



'2°° cover charge 
Friday & Saturday Nights ; ) 




Look for SURPRISE 
^SPECIALS EVERY NIGHT 



Opinion 



Environmentalists Losing One-Sided War 



A Week of Thanks 
And One of Sorrow 



East week was a week that saw a true friend of Northwestern 
come see us, and a elose friend of Northwestern leave us. It was 
a week of celebration and one that j ust as quickly turned to a 
week of mourning. 

l ast Thursday morning, Northwestern lost one ol its iruly 
great friends in former President Dr. Rene. I. Bienvenu who died 
in a Shreveporl hospital. 

Dr. Bienvenu was a man who had as good a relationship with 
the students of NSU as perhaps any other president in the state 
or the south. When he was in town, his office was always open 
and he more than made you feel at home when you got in to sec 
him. I think probably the standard of a college president's 
relationship with his students should by judged by lite 
relationships between Dr. Bienvenu and his students. It was 
mutual admiration on both sides. 

Dr. B. always seemed to have the students needs on his mind. 
If there was a problem, he was ready to listen and then work 
hard toward a solution. He was always in the thick of student 
activities and he was as big a Northwestern supporter as there 
was. 

Many, many Northwestern students fell a very personal loss 
with the death of Dr. Bienvenu, words alone don't express the 
sorrow of noi only ihe NSU students, but the faculty, staff, and 
the town of Natchitoches. 

Another friend of Northwestern, Governor Dave Trccn, made 
a stop in town the other day (Wednesday) and presented us with 
a little gift. A tittle gift, that is, of over eight-thousand dollars in 
budgei-cul exemptions. Thanks governor, thai was a real nice 
thing to do. 

Bui along with thanking our governor, let's not for one 
minute forget about Ihe diligent efforts of Northwestcrn's two 
slate legislator's. Senator Don Kelly and Representative Jimmy 
Long. 

Those two men have long been good, good friends of Nor- 
thwestern. Their successful lobbying efforts and their much 
respected records as two of Lousiana's (inert legislator's actually 
led to this exemption. 

Northwestern is extremely lucky to be represented by these 
two men, both of whom always think of Northwestern when 
ihey are dow n in Baton Rouge. It was these same two men who 
just a year ago, got Northwestern selected as the sight for the 
new Gifted and Talented High School that will open up this fall. 

Thai Of course, means that dorms that have been previously 
unoccupied will be filled, and these potential students can see all 
the benefits that NSU offers them, first hand. 

Let's give credit where credit is due. First to Governor Dave 
Treeu vvho proved to be a good friend of Northwestern by 
granting us the exemption, knowing full well that somebody like 
i.SU-S chancellor Dr. Grady Bogue would lake a cheap shot, at 
. us with all the media attention thai Shreveport can give him 
(daily newspapers and television), and sticking to his guns and 
granting us the exemption. Secondly, a big round of thanks goes 
to Senator Kelly and Representative Long; they deserve it for all 
Ihe positive things and hard work thai ihey do for Nor- 
th western. -Joe Cunningham 




John Hess 



Parable for our times is the 
village of Times Beach, Mo. 
The former village, that is. 
Times Beach was a model 
community, sponsored by a 
St. Louis newspaper in the 
booming 1920s as a 
wholesome place for working 
people to live. 
Its only 
drawback was 
also a virtue: 
It was in a 
flood plain, so 
land was 
cheap. 

Three years 
ago , the 
federal government offered 
flood insurance, which nc 
private company would give. 
It set one condition, that 
houses be elevated and ear- 
thworks built, but it offered to 
pay 95 percent of the cost. 

The 2,000 residents debated 
the proposal. This was 1980, 
and the message in the air was 
that the government was a 
monster on the taxpayer's 
back. The plan was defeated 
by a single vote. 

Early last December, the 
Meramec River rose. When it 
receded, Times Beach was a 
mud flat doited with wrecked 
homes. 

As survivors trickled back, 
one of the first things the 
mayor did was to appeal for 
federal aid to rebuild their 
homes, but fate now delivered 
an even more shaiering blow . 

The authorities advised 
them that their village was 
heavily contaminated with 




People 
Power 



helps 
prevent 
birth 
defects 

Support 
March of Dimes 



Editor Advertising Manager 
Joe Cunningham Jr. Charlene Elvers 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



News Editor 
Lisa W illiams 

Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 

Circulation Manager 
Dean \apoli 



Business Manager 
David Sa>lors 

Co-Kocus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. News Editor 
Diana Gratton 

Photographer 
Melanie Daigle 



Advisor 
Frank Presson 



Current Sauce is the official publication of 
ihe student body of Northwestern Slate 
University in Natchitoches. Louisiana. ' The 
newspaper is entered as second class matter al 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March 3. 1179. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weckly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times. Highway I 
South, Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357-5456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend frot. the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
.libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 



dioxin. The deadly chemical 
came from a plant in Verona, 
Mo., that had manufactured 
Agent Orange herbicide 
during the Vietnam War. 

Its waste oil had been spread 
around the state as a spray to 
harden dirt roads and playing 
fields. Times Beach appears 
to have been one of the 
beneficiaries. 

Residents now remembered 
mysterious plagues that had 
killed livestock and pets in 
years gone by. But some of 
them returned to their ruined 
homesteads, past new sign- 
boards bearing the skull and 
crossbones. 

Looking ironically at the 
state workmen in "spacesuits" 
who were gathering up the 
poisoned debris, they said it 
was too late for them to avoid 
exposure and besides, they had 
nowhere else to go. 

So Times Beach was another 
casualtyof the Vietnam War. 
More broadly, it was a victim 
of another war, which is still 
going on. It is the war bet- 
ween the worshipppers of the 
quick buck and those 
"elitists," those "imparactical 
dreamers," known as en- 
vironmentalists. 

"Conservatives" - an ironic 
name in this context - charge 
that alarmists bankrupt in- 
dustry with their costly 
regulations. They have rallied, 
workers with such slogans as 
"Out of Work and Hungry? 
Eat an Environmentalist." 

A fair test of this thesis is 
the James River in Virginia. 



The pesticide Kepone 
destroyed its rich fishing 
industry, and the cost of a 
cleanup is estimated in the. 
billions. An organization 
called Resources for the 
Future points out that 
preventive action at the 
chemical plant might have cost 
ii $100,000 a year. 

But the chemical industry 
prefers to spend money 
fighting regulation. And it 
now controls the En- 
vironmental Protection 
Agency. Bs top officials 
under Anne Gorsuch - Rila 
Lavelle, Robert Perry, John 
Todhunter, Kathleen Bennett - 
all have worked as lawyers and 
publicists for polluters. 

Jim Sibbison, an EPA 
public man vvho resigned, told 
Common Cause that his 
releases had been edited to 
delete words like "cancer" 
and "sterility" as possible 
effects of a pesticide. Secret 
meetings of EPA officials with 
industry representatives have 
led to rulings in favor of in- 
dustry. 

So in a manner of speaking, 
we all live in Times Beach. 

By a narrow margin, we 
voted for anti- 
environmentalism in 1980; we 
voted the government off our 
backs. The flood has not hit 
most of us yet, and the men in 
the spacesuits are not yet 
poking around in the debris of 
our homes, butthe pollution is 
spreading. 

Maybe we ought to 
reconsider our vote, while 
there is time. 



f'VVhat's On Your Mind", This Wednesday Night 8:00) 

Starring President Orze 
You Gotta Question? He Gotta Answer. 
, KNWD91.7fm. 




I 



The Current Sauce, February 1. 1983. Page 5 



She's The Epitome of an NSU Supporter 



She might just be Nor- 
thwestern's biggest supporter. 
She has to be considered one 
of our greatest fans. Last fall 
she was in the top three for the 
Current Sauce's "Best 
Teacher" survey. Her name is 
Elise James and she teaches 
Office Administration. 

Her dedication to Nor- 
thwestern and Northwestern 
athletics runs deeper than 
most. In addition to being a 
member of the Demon booster 
club, Mrs. James is also the 
only woman on the Athletic 
Council. Her dedication to 
her students and her influence 
on them remain with those 
students even after 
graduation. "I still hear from 
kids I taught 10 years ago," 
she says, "they know they can 
come to me if something is the 
matter." 

Last fall, some of her 
dediction was finally publicly 
noticed. At the Booster 
Club's kickoff party at the 
Louisiana Outdoor Am- 
phitheatre, Mrs. James was 
given a bouquet of red roses 
from the Demon football 
team. She framed the card 
that went along with the 
bouquet. 

"Sports are very important 




the courtside bleachers. And 
she always draws a crowd. An 
admirer of Mrs. James said 
recently, "When she gets to 
the games, people just 
naturally make a beeline to sit 
with, or at least around her. 
It's like she's the picnic that 
drew the ants." 

One of Mrs. James most 
memorable times as a Demon 
Booster was the time when she 
accompanied the football 



Elise James 

to a university," Mrs. James 
said, "not only from the 
standpoint that they bring 
student athletes here, but a 
good athletic program 
promotes a good student 
body. Where there is en- 
thusiasm and school spirit, it 
creates a feeling of closeness." 

Rarely does Mrs. James 
miss a Demon, or a Lady 
Demon, athletic event. You 
can see her at all of the Demon 
and Lady Demon basketball 
games in her favorite chair in 



:-:;-;:;y: : .; 




BILL 
MURRAY 




IN 



Shown in The Addition 1 st flooc 
S.U. Jan 31 Feb. 4 every 2 
hours. Must present ID. 



YOUR BSN 
IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional nurse. 
In the Army, it also means you're an officer. You 
start as a full-fledged member of our medical team. 
Call your local Army Nurse Corps Recruiter. Or 
stop by. 



Sgt. 1st Class Russ Brown 
Room 4 15, 301 Center St. 
Little Rock, Arkansas 
Phone: 378-5840 



ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



team on a flight to San 
Angelo, Texas to watch the 
Demons play. 

"It was interesting to see 
how they traveled. With fifty 
players and trainers in one 
motel, there wasn't one bit of 
trouble. 1 know you heara.lot 
about the footbll team being a 
bunch of bad guys, but 
traveling with that bunch of 
boys was a delightful ex- 
perience. 



Her dedication to NSU 
mirrors her current optismism 
about NSU athletics. 

"Our program is going well. 
One of the keys to a suc- 
cessful athletic program is the 
support from the fans." She 
adds, "Now is the time they 
need you the most, we can 
only continue to move for- 
ward if we have a good athletic 
program and we are getting 
there." 



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Demons 



Lady Demons 



Base 



Sports 



Softball 



BasUe 



The Current Sauce 
February 1, 1983 
Page 6 



Lady Demons Nip Nevada-Reno 
In First Game of Road Trip 



Lady Demons Trounce Reno 
84-72 in Second Game 



The Lady Demons 
recovered from the ill effects 
that the altitude had on them 
the first night, by rolling to an 
84-72 win over Nevada-Reno 
in the second game of the two- 
game scries. 

The game was never really 
close as Northwestern built up 
a 20-point first half lead and 
coasted to their second win 
over Nevada-Reno in two 
nights. 

The Lady Demons, up by 20 
with about four minutes to 
play in the first half, sub- 
stituted freely to give everyone 
a chance to come to grips with 
the thinned oxygen supply in 
the mountain coliseum. 
Nevada- Reno closed the gap 
to 44-31 at halftime, but the 
Lady Demons never let them 



get closer, completely 
dominating play in the second 
half. 

Stephany Washington 
ended the night as the Lady 
Demons leading scorer with 21 
points. She was followed 
closely by Tracy Talor with 19 
points, Teressa Thomas with 
15, and Lonnie Banks with 10. 

Also scoring for the Lady 
Demons were Val Williams 
with nine, Kim Paulk with six, 
and Lisa Carter and Katie 
Harris each with two points. 

Washington picked up 10 
rebounds for the Lady 
Demons cause and Taylor 
added nine of her own. 
Williams grabbed seven 
boards for the Lady Demons 
also. Paulk and Thomas each 
dished out a generous eight 
assists. 



The Northwestern Lady 
Demons overcame the altitude 
and played clutch basketball 
when it counted the most, in 
downing Nevado-Reno 69-64 
in the first game of a two- 
game series. 

With 1:48 left in the game, 
Lady Demon center Tracy 
Taylor picked up her fifth 
personal foul. Reno made the 
ensueing foul shots and moved 
ahead 62-59. 

Kim Paulk hit a 15-foot 
jumper 18 seconds later to pull 
NSU within one, 63-62. The 
Lady Demons then forced a 
Nevada-Reno turnover when 
the Reno girls couldn't get a 
shot off within the 30 second 
time period. 

Paulk scored again on a 
layup to put the Lady Demons 
up by one and then Stephany 
Washington stole the ball and 
layed it in to give the Lady 
Demons the lead they never 
relinquished 65-62. 

Moments later, NSU had 
the ball again and Teressa 
Thomas was fouled and went 
to the foul line to shoot two. 
She made both of them and 
Nevada- Reno took the in- 
bounds pass and made a quick 
bucket to pull within one, 65- 
64. 



The Lady Demons got the 
ball back one last time and 
again Thomas was fouled. She 
went to the free throw line and 
calmly sank both shots to give 
the Lady Demons their final 
points. 

Washington led the Lady 
Demons with 19 points on an 
outstanding nine of 10 per- 
formance from the field. 
Paulk, Taylor, and Lonnie 
Banks each pitched in 12 
points and Thomas threw in 10 
for the evening. 

Banks continued her 
domination of the boards by 
grabbing 10 and Taylor, Paulk 
and Washington each had five 
rebounds for the nights work. 



Hale Scores 32 As NSU Rips 
Georgia Southern In TAAC Play 



Kenny Hale led a fast- 
breaking Demon offense, and 
Calvin Madlock and Johnny 
Martin dominated the boards 
as the NSU Demons 
dominated the Georgia 
Southern balldib 78-62 in 
Trans America Athletic 
Conference action. 

Northwestern never trailed 
in the contest in upping their 
TAAC record to 4-5 and push 
their overall record to 5-13. 
Georgia Southern dropped to 
4-6 in the TAAC and 8-10 
overall. 

With the scored tied 8-8 
early in the first half, NSU 
scored twice as many as 
Georgia Southern did for the 
rest of that half and went into 
the lockerroom with a 38-22 
lead. 

Georgia Southern came out 
strong in the second half, 
outscoring the Demons 18-6, 
to pull within four points, 44- 
40. 

Slowly, Northwestern 
battled back and increased 
their lead to 20 points when 
Martin hit both ends of a 1-1 
free throw. 

Yates emptied the bench 
over the last two minutes of 
the game but Georgia 
Southern couldn't close the 
gap. 



The Demons were led by 
Hale's 32 points while Martin 
added 15 and Madlock poured 
in 12. Martin and Madlock 



both contributed 10 rebounds 
to the Demons cause and 
Madlock and Brian Jolivette 
each dished out four assists. 



Support Northwestern- 
Watch a Basketball Game 



PROMPT, EFFICIENT AND FRIENDLY SERVICE 



S & S FLOWER SHOP 

317 NORTH STREET 
P. O. BOX 215 
NATCHITOCHES. LOUISIANA 71457 

PHONE 357-8273 
Jamci and Eddie Scarborough Home 352-5808 

— We Honor Major Credit Cards — 

10% DISCOUNT FOR ALL NSU STUDENTS PRESENTING AN ID 



STUDENT UNION 
CAFATERIA 

Mon.: Red Beans & Sausage over 
Rice, Small Salad/Med. Soft Drink. 
s 2 00 . 

Tues.: 2 Pieces Chicken/Whipped 
Potatoes & Gravy, Vegetables, 
Small Salad/Med Drink. s 2' 5 . 

Wed.: "Free Med Drink" with 
quarter pounder/w/cheese. order ot 
fries. 

Thurs.: Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, 
Roll & Med. Soft Drink. s 2°°. 

Fri.: Tuna Noodle Casserole/Potato, 
Vegetable/Small Salad/Med. Soft 
Drink. s 2 5 °. 



L 

Th 
Dcnn 
defei 
claim 
visi 
Univ 
baski 
Cole: 

Th 
phys: 
quid 
apiec 

Tl 
to a 
shots 
right 
with 

W 
biatE 
went 
Rod 



SUGB Presents - DAVID WILLIS 

magician/comedian featuring 
Sidney the Skunk 

Wed., Feb. 2 
8 pm 
S.U. Ballroom 




B0JANGLES 

Tuesday thru Friday 

Dance & Party With The 

KEVIN STEWART BAND 



Saturday, February 5 

OPUS 

Roll into Bojangles 
Don't miss one of Louisiana's Top Name Show Bands 

Tuesday Night 

IS BUDWEISER RAISE HELL NIGHT 

FREE PITCHES OF COLD BUDWEISER BEER 
Given away every half hour to the table that can 
RAISE THE MOST HELL! 



Wednesday Night 

IS LADIES NIGHT 

2 FREE DRINKS FOR ALL LADIES 
Plus Unannounced Specials 



_ 



The best week end entertainment in the area 

M mm I I*UHr1 Oll^l"I!<">' 
THE KEVIN STEWART BAND ON FRIDAY 

OPUS ON SATURDAY 



Appearing February 7-11 

TYTUS HALE 

& February 1 2 

CIMMAR0N 



Monday thru Friday 
HAPPY HOUR DAILY 6 8 pm 
ALL LONG NECKS 75 c 6 10 pm 



Proper Attire & I.D. Required 



The Current Same. February I, 1983. Page 7 



Lady Demons Defense Sparks Win Over SLU 



The Northwestern Lady 
Demons used a standout 
defensive performance 10 
claim a 66-57 victory over the 
visiting Southeastern 
University Lady Lions is 
basketball played at Prather 
Colesium Tuesday night. 

The game started off very 
physicaly and both teams were 
quickly whistled for four fous 
apiece. 

The Lady Demons jumped 
to a quick 4-0 lead on foul 
shots but the Lady Lions came 
right back and went ahead 6-4 
with a physical inside game. 

When some obviously 
blatant pushing and shoving 
went unnoticed by the referee, 
Rodney Thrash, a member of 



the famed Baseline Bums, 
picked up his first technical 
foul of the season in an ex- 
:hange of ideas and views with 
the referee. SLU was awarded 
one shot and Robin Roberts 
calmy missed. 

That sparked the crowd and 
the Lady Demons, and NSU 
scored eight straight points to 
take the lead for good. The 
Ladv Demons hit their biggest 
lead' at 29-19 on a > Val 
Williams jumper and ket it at 
10 points one minute later 
when Stephany Washington 
hit a short jumper from the 
lane. The Lady Demons best 
overall first half of te season 
ended with them ahead 31-25. 

The Ladv Demons charged 



out an tipped their lead to 10 
points again when cat-quick 
Lonnic Banks stole the ball 
and raced downcoun un- 
molested for the lavup to put 
NSU ahead 41-3 1 . 

Then ii was M U's turn to 
get hot and they wen! on a 14- 
4 spun to lie the Lady Demons 
with just under 10 minutes 
left. 

The Lady Demons came 
back and scored seven straight 
to pull ahead 52-45 and never 
looked back as they coasted to 
their ninth win against six 
losses. SLU evened its record 
at 7-7. 

Coaches Pat Pierson and 
James Smith agreed that the 
defensive performance and the 



overall first half effort were 
keys to to the victory. 

Pierson said, "We showed 
alot of intensity and con- 
centration. We're usually a 
second half team and that was 
our best first half in a long 
time." She added, "Our 
defense was good and our 
maturity was showing 
tonight." 

After coming off a thumb 
injury, senior forward 



Stephany Wshington lead al 
scorers with 18 points and 
grabbed 12 rebounds, while 
getting eight steals. Tracy 
Taylor added 16 points and 
Lonnie Banks cashed in 14. 
Banks, Tandra Lewis, and 
Lisa Carter all had five 
rebounds for the Lady 
Demons, and Washington and 
Teressa Thomas dished out 
five and four assists respec- 
tively. 



SUGB 
CARNATION SALE! 

$ 1 00 Teach, (Red, White) 
Feb. 7&8from 11-3 
S.U. Lobby 





The Current Sauce, February I, 1983, Page X 



Intramural Ping-Pong Tourney Draws Big Crowd Samf ord Drops Demons 



Last week the intramural 
department held it s table 
tennis tournament, which 
consisted of both singles and 
doubles competition in the 
men's and women's divisions. 

The men's doubles cosisted 
of eight teams. Arman 
Naghaue and Herianto 
Suhendra of Kingpins took 
top honors in the event, while 
Dani and lwan Waworuntu of 
3-V International were run- 
ners-up. 

Rounding out the com- 
petition was Joe Bienvenu of 
YANG and Eddie McDugle of 
Conine tying for third with 



Los Amigos' Louis Vasquez 
and Jorge Mancilla. 

In the men's singles, it was 
Kingpins' Suhendra winning 
first again, and Beto Vasquez 
taking second for Los Amigos. 

Fernando Manual, also 
playing for Los Amigos tied 
for third with Dani 
Waworuntu. 

Jutta Green and Elsa 
Ramirez were the champions 
in the women's doubles 
competition, that saw eight 
teams enter that phase of the 
tournament also. 

Phi Mu's Lynn Clary and 



Angela Lasyone took a second 
place finish. Sigma Kappa's 
Jenny Johnson and Ghlee 
Woodworth were beaten in the 
second round to tie for third 
with Dwanda Smith and 
Marion Johnson of Zeta Phi 
Beta. 

21 women entered the 
singles competition, but it was 
Los Amigos' Ramirez who 
took it all when she defeated 
Sylvia Del Carmen, also of 
Los Amigos in the cham- 
pionship. Fellow Tri-Sigs, 
Stacy Maddox and Kim Gill 
tied for third. 




Samford University took 
advantage of sloppy team play 
and a plague of Northwestern 
fouls to turn back the Demons 
90-70 in a TAAC game played 
Thursday night. 

Trailing 69-62 after being 
down by 20 points in the 
second half, Demon guard 
Kenny Hale hit a jump shot at 
the free throw line and was 
charged with a questionable 
foul, his fifth of the night. 

Moments later, NSU's 
Johnny Martin was whistled 
for his fifth foul of the night 
and Samford opened up a 12 
point lead. Calvin Madlock 
made both ends of a 1-1 foul 
shot, but shortly thereafter he 
too became the victim of the 
referee's whistle as he was 
charged with his fifth foul of 
the night. Northwestern 
didn't score for the last 2:14 of 
the game and Madlock's final 
points were NSU's last ones. 
Samford added 10 more of 
their own for the win making 
them 3-5 in the TAAC, the 



same as NSU. 

Samford went into the 
lockerroom at halftime 
holding a 47-36 lead as they 
shot an outstanding 64 percent 
from the field in the initial 
half. NSU was a victim of 
their own game as they just 
couldn't control the ball and 
simply threw away numerous 
scoring oppurtunities. Poor 
shot selection also contributed 
to their 41 percent shooting 
average 

Northwestern forced 
another turnover and could 
have cut the gap to five on two 
successive occasions, but 
sloppy ballhandling thwarted 
the comeback. One minute 
later, Hale picked up his fifth 
foul and the wind seemed to be 
taken out of the Demons sails. 

Hale and Madlock ended 
the night as the Demons 
leading scorers with 20 points 
apiece, followed by Martin 
with 15. Madlock and A.J. 
Culbreath each had six 
rebounds for the Demons. 



NSU Loses Heartbreaker 



The NSU Demons played 
about as well as you can, and 
still dropped a heartbreaker to 
the University of Arkansas- 
Little Rock by a score of 50- 
47. 

Down by one point with just 
under two minutes to play, the 
Demons were forced to foul 
and the UALR Trojans 
responded by sinking eight 
straight. 

The Demons shot an un- 
beleivable 71 percent from the 
field, including 90 percent in 
the second half, but were 
whistled for 17 fouls com- 
pared to just eight for UALR. 
The Trojans went to the line 
22 time while Northwestern 
made the trip just three times. 



The first half ended with 
NSU up by two points 28-26. 
UALR came back to take the 
lead and used foul shots to 
keep it, en route to the Trans 
America Athletic Conference 
victory. NSU dropped to 3-5 
in the TAAC. , 

For the night NSU was led 
by Calvin Madlock with 13 
points, including a six for 
eight showing from the field. 
Madlock also was the Demons 
high rebounder with three. 

Harry Francis popped in 12 
points for the Demons "and 
Kenny Hale added 10. Johnny 
Martin also had three 
rebounds on the night and 
A.J. Culbreath had two 
assists. 





Menu for Iberville 




LUNCH 


Dinner 


Tues. 2/1 


Hot Roast Beef Sandwich, 
Ground Beef & Bean Casserole 


Lasagna, 

Chinese pepper Steak 


Wed. 2/2 


Chili and Grilled Cheese 
Turkey Noodel au Gratin 


Steak 

Fried Shrimp 
Cheeseburger 


Thurs. 2/3 


Red Beans, Rice & Sausage 
Meatpies 


Chicken Fried Steak 
Pork Chow Mein 


Fri. 2/4 


Hamburgers 
Shrimp Fried Rice 


Spaghetti & Meat Sauce 
Fried Fish Fillets 


Sat. 2/5 


BBQ on Bun 

Ground Beef Stroganoff 


Grilled Pork Chop 
Beef & Bean Burrittos 


Sun. 2/6 


Fried Chicken 
Scrambled Eggs & Bacon 


French Dip Sandwich 
Stuffed Cabbage Rolls 


Mon. 2/7 


Fried Chicken Livers 
Red Beans Rice, Sausage 


Taco Bar 


Tues. 2/8 


Sloppy Joe on Bun 
Scalloped Apples & Sausage 


Roast Turkey & Dressing 
Beef Stew 




All menus subject to change. 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX No. 19 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




March 8, 1983 



Kappa Alpha Boxing Tourney 
To Be Held March 16-17 



Dr. Barry Smiley Named 
Dean of College of Business 



Dr. Barry A. Smiley, 
chairman of the business 
administration department at 
Louisiana College in Pineville 
for the past three years, has 
been appointed dean of the 
College of Business and 
Applied Sciences at Nor- 
thwestern. 

Smiley's appointment, 
which becomes effective July 
1, was announced this week by 
NSU President Dr. Joseph J. 
Orze following approval by 
the Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities. 

As dean of the recently- 
reorganized College of 
Business and Applied Sciences 
at NSU, Smiley will be the 
administrator of a college 
comprised of the departments 
of business administration and 
management, business-distri- 
butive education and office 
administration, industrial 
education and technology, 
home economics, and 
agriculture and animal 
sciences. 

Northwestern's new dean 
has served since 1980 as 
chairman and professor of 
Louisiana College's Depart- 



ment of Business Ad- 
ministration. While at the 
Pineville school, he was the 
recipient of the first endowed 
professorship in the college's 
history and last year was 

elected chairman of the 
faculty. 

Before going to Louisiana 
College, he was associate 
professor and coordinator of 
marketing for two years at 
Columbus College in Georgia 
and was associate professor of 
marketing for six years at East 
Texas State University in 
Commerce. 

Smiley received the bachelor 
of arts degree in economics 
from Duke University, the 
master of business ad- 
ministration degree from San 
los£_ ... Si ale. — University — wi- 



dening punched around is 
no fun, unless it takes place in 
the annual Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity Boxing Tour- 
nament for Muscular 
Dystrophy at Northwestern. 

Northwestern students with 
little or no boxing skills have 
taken hundreds of punches in 
the eight-year history of the 
tournament, an event that has 
been proclaimed as one of the 
best amateur boxing shows in 
the South. 

The tournament, which is so 
exciting and popular that i! is 
being featured in the March 
issue of College Sports 
Magazine, raised over $2,400 
last year for the National 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Association. The total 
contributions to the national 
MDA since 1975 is more than 




California and the doctor of 
business administration degree 
in marketing from Louisiana 
Tech Universitv. 

During his professional 
career, the Grove City, Pa., 
native has received numerous 
honors, including Marketing 
Educator of the Year in 1976 
from Sales and Marketing 
Executives of Dallas, Tex. 




"Punching One Another for 
MD" has become the theme 
for the Kappa Alpha tour- 
nament, which is being 
presented for the ninth year on 
Wednesday and Thursday, 
March 16-17, in the In- 
tramural Building (Old Men's 
Gym) on the NSU campus. 
The boxing program begins 
oach night at 7:30 p.m. 

Northwestern students, 
both men and women, may 
sign up for the tournament in 
the Office of the Dean of 
Students. Room 309 of the 
Student Union Building. The 
official weigh-in ceremonies 
will be conducted Tuesday, 
March 15, in the second- floor 
lobby of the Student Union. 

James LaCaze, a graduating 
senior from Natchitoches, is 
directing the ninth annual 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
Boxing Tournament for 
Muscular Dystrophy. He said 
the tournament will feature 
several weight divisions. 
Preliminary bouts are 
scheduled for Wednesday 
night and the championship 
program will be conducted 
Thursday night. 



C.J. James of Bossier City goes to the head of Angei 

Negron in this heavyweight bout of last year's K.A. 
Boxing Tourney. This year's tourney is scheduled for 
JVlarck 16*17 at 7:30 p.m. in the Intramural Building. 



NSU students may sign up for the event in Room 309 
of the Student Union. 



Tickets for each tournament 
session are $3 per person. 
Additional information about 
the Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
Boxing Tournament for. 
Muscular Dystrophy is 
available by calling LaCaze at 
(318)352-9411 or 352-4497. 

LaCaze said he encourages 
each fraternity, men's 
residence hall and other 
organizations on campus to 
sponsor as many boxers as 
possible in this year's tour- 
nament. 

One individual who has 
been closely associated with 
the tournament since its 
beginning is Jim Johnson, 
assistant news bureau director 
at Northwestern. Johnson has 
been the publicist and ring 
announcer for the tour- 
nament. 

"During the first four or 
five years of the tournament," 
Johnson recalled recently, 
''nearly all campus 
organizations had at least one 
student entered. There was a 
tremendous amount of pride 



and determination by the 
students." 

Johnson added, "Of 
course, the inlerfralernity 
competition was very keen 
back then. Northwestern 
fraternities saw to it that their 
organization was well 
represented, and some of the 
best amateur bouts were 
fought by members of 
fraternities." 

Johnson said he would like 
to see campus fraternities 
sponsor three or four boxers. 
"Other organizations and 
students unattached to a 
particular group are being 
encouraged to help give the 
public an excellent show," he 
stated. 

LaCaze said something new 
this year is women's boxing. 
"We already have two bouts 
committed between members 
of Phi Mu and Tri Sigma 
sororities," stated LaCaze. 
"Another sorority has three 
girls who want to box, but we 
need someone to fight them." 



Illegal Cooking Results In Sabine Dorm Fire 



David Ulmer (left) of the University of Yang and 
J ames LaCaze of Kappa Alpha do battle in the first 
round of the Intramural, backgammon tournament 
"eld Wednesday. (Photo by Melanie Daigle) 



Illegal cooking by a dor- 
mitory resident on 3rd floor, 
East wing of Sabine Dorm was 
the cause of a fire on Thur- 
sday, February 24 at apt 
proximately 9:15 p.m. Ac- 
cording to Mickie Townsend, 
Coordinator of Housing, the 
student had put a pot of 
heating oil on a hot plate on 
the desk to heat some french 



fries. She left the room and 
walked down the hall. 
Meanwhile, the grease got too 
hot and exploded into flames 
scorching the wall, ceiling and 
burning the desk shelf. Upon 
returning, she and others 
attempted to smother the fire 
with a blanket. The House 
Director completed the job 
and put the "smothering 



material" in the shower. The 
resident asked to move across 
the hall. 

"Students returned to iheii 
rooms at 9:50 and the fire 
department was not called as 
the girls extinguished it 
themselves," according to Lt. 
Massey of Campus Security. 

As a result, the entire room 
Continued on Page 2 



The Current Sauce, March 8, 1983, Page 2 



Ticket Sales Looking Good For 
"...Virginia Wolfe" Presentation 



The University Theatre at 
Northwestern reports that 
ticket sales have been very 
good for Edward Albee's 
"Who's Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf?" which plays March 
14-18 in the Theatre West at 
NSU's A. A. Fredericks Center 
for the Creative and Per- 
forming Arts. 

"We are selling 
tickets for each of 
pe r f or m a nee*," 
University Theatre 
Nan L. Stephenson, 
of limited seating, the 
Thursday night performance is 
nearly sold out but there arc 
plenty of tickets available for 
I he other shows." 

Miss Stephenson added, 
" I ickct sales look good for 
the opening performance on 
Monday night. The Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday 
performances have lots of 
tickets available." . 

According to the University 
Theatre director, "Nat- 



only 127 
the five 
said 
director 

''Because 



chitoches has never been 
considered a big advance 
ticket-selling town, but 
because of the small capacity 
of our theatre, people who 
plan to see this outstanding 
production should purchase 
their tickets ahead of time to 
avoid any disappointments at 
the theatre box office." 

"Who's Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf?" is being directed by 

...Sabine Fire cont'd 

Continued from Page 1 

will have to be painted, the 
ceiling and shelf near the desk 
replaced, and metal strips 
which hold the ceiling tiles in 
will have to be replaced and 
cleaned explained Townsend. 

Campus Security Officers 
I oshee and Ciuilliams, House 
Directors, and resident 
assistants had a hard time 
iietling everyone ot evacuate 



Ray Schexnider of Nor- 
thwestern's Theatre-Speech 
Department. 

Tickets for the production 
are priced at $3 for adults and 
51.50 for non-NSU students. 
They may be purchased at the 
box office Monday through 
Friday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 
or reserved by calling (318) 
357-6196, 



be too late and there will be a 
real fire." Students were 
apathetic the night of the 24th 
even though the alarm was 
pulled because of a real fire, 
the dorm. Townsend com- 
pared the number of false 
alarms turned in to the boy 
who cried w olf so many times. 
She went on, "Students keep 
pulling them, think it's cute 
and laugh, but one dav it will 




*250ff 

any Jostens gold ring 

Sec WHir jostens rvpresentative 

NSU Bookstore 
March 14-18, 9-3 
University Bookstore 
Rep. will be here 
March 1 6 & 1 7! 





It's got to be the Spring feefhtg in the air. At tea* 

that and the sunshine, which made for a perfect 
afternoon of snoozing on Chaplin's Lake. (Photo by 
Melanie Daigle) 



Academic Changes 

The following changes in academic policies were 
passed in (he Admission Credits, and Graduation 
Committee meeting on January 18, 1983: 
l.lf a student fails a course at N.S.U., the "F" earned 
may be removed only by repeating the course at N.S.U. 
Only grades of "F" are subject to (his rule. 
2. Students are allowed to drop courses other than 
Freshman Fnglish without penalty until the close of the 
fifth day after mid-term grades are due and (he 
equivalent dale in Summer Session. (Effective Summer, 
1983) Freshman Fnglish may be dropped without 
penalty five class days prior to beginning of final 
examination. 

Extra-curricular activities involves credit in activities 
such as the hand, chorus, debate, drama, ensemble, 
orchestra, radio, varsity sports, danceline, or other 
extra-curricular activities where course credit may he 
obtained. These courses may be repeated as many times 
as desired; however, no more than 8 semester hours of 
credit earned in any combination of extra-curricular 
acti vi t ie s may be applied toward fulfillment of degree 
requirements. A maximum of 4 semester hours credit in 
any one of these activities may be applied to degree 
requirements. 




In the early days of electricity, these words were 
displayed in rooms equipped with the new Ed- 
ison Electric Light Bulbs because people thought 
they were unsafe. Some people feel that same 
way about nuclear power today. But after more 
than 25 years of commercial experience, not a 
single member of the public has been injured by 
the operation of a nuclear power plant. An un- 
matched safety record. 

YOUR FIVE 
LOUISIANA INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

lVntr.il liHH-un.i tli'tlfu ('itrhf'urW Cult Sl.ite*- (. tilitft* 
i <<™p.Hi\ Unifuinj I'owtt & Ltflhl Ctirnp.im Noh Otle.in- Puhht 
Vnur fm NnittnwMtTn Ehtftht Vowit I umi>.in\ 



Phi Mu 

Hi again! Spring fever has 
hit NSU and the Phi Mus have 
definitely got it! 

We had a preppy meeting 
Sunday, February and 
everyone showed up in Izod 
Shirts and topsiders. 

Saturday, March 5 we had 
our Mother-Daughter Banquet 
at the Holiday Inn. This was a 
very special occasion because 
it was the 131 year anniversary 
of Phi Mu. 

Angela Lasyone came 
through again in Intramurals. 
She placed 3rd in Monopoly, 
1st in Video games, and tied 
for 2nd in golf. What would 
we do without her? 

Also, we are very proud of 
Melanie Campbell and Anna 
Hill because they were invited 
to become members of Phi 
Kappa Phi, and Honors 
Society. Way to go girls! 

Until next week, keep 
smiling! 

PRSSA 

WANTED: A FEW GOOD 
STUDENTS, from any major, 
with a strong interest in 
learning about, being involved 
in, and doing public relations. 
Numerous opportunities are 
available to study, learn and 
practice PR. Mail your name, 
address, phone number, and 
major to Franklin Presson, 
NSU PO Box 5234. You may 
be a winner! 



Organizations 



The Current Sauce, March 8, 1983, Page 3 



Panhellenic 



SAM 

The members of the Society 
for the Advancement of 
Management will hold its 
monthly membership meeting 
On Wednesday, March 9, 1983 
at 3:00 p.m. in room 108 of 
the Business Administration 
Building. 

Any student, regardless of 
major, who is interested in 
joining this organization, may 
obtain applications in the 
secretary's office in the 
Business Administration 
Building before March 16, 
1983. 

On March 23, 1983, SAM 
will be sponsoring its second 
annual STUDENT INCOME 
TAX SEMINAR. The 
purpose of this seminar will be 
to assist students in filing their 
federal income taxes using 
form 1040A or 1040EZ. 

All interested persons are 
welcomed to attend 
tomorrow's meeting. 

Theta Chi Little Sis' 

The Daughters' and Little 
Sisters of Theta Chi will be 
raffling $50 or a keg of beer, 
the winner's choice. The 
drawing will be held Mon., 
March 21. The last date to 
purchase tickets is Saturday, 
March 19. Donations for the 
tickets are $1. Tickets can be 
bought from any Theta Chi 
daughter or Li 1 * Sis. 



Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Kappa has been very 
busy since the Mardi Gras 
holidays. On Thursday, 
February 19, Sigma's went out 
to collect money for the Heart 
Fund for the Riverside Guest 
Care Center. Over four- 
hundred dollars was collected. 

Congratulations to Monica 
Aucoin who was installed as 
Panhellenic secretary on 
January 6. We also 
congratulate sisters Kim 
Toilet, Beth Sandiford, 
Regina Rousseaux and Ghlee 
Woodworth who were invited 
to attend the Phi Kappa 
Honors Banquet. We're 
proud of you! 

On February 26, the pledges 
had a retreat. Congratulations 
to the pledge class on their 
election of officers. They are 
as follows: Rachele Williams- 
president; Terri Morehouse- 
vice president; Ginger Disante- 
secretry; Penny Craft- 
treasurer; Paula Simmons- 
committee chairman; Celeste 
Covington-philanthropy; and 
Fran Hanks-Panhellenic. 

Congratulations to Kim 
Toilet and the NSU Tennis 
Team on their win against 
Stephen F. Austin and Mc- 
Neese. We're proud of you! 
Good Luck to the Lady 
Demons Softball team for a 
successful season. 



FCA 




99<: PIZZA 

Buy any pizza and gel the next 
smaller same style pizza with 
equal number of toppings, for 
99c. Present this coupon with 
guest check. Not valid with any 
other offer. 
Expiration: Mar 16 

Pizza inn s 



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$2.00 Off A Medium Pizza 

Buy any pizza, and get 5 3.00 off a 
large, or *2.00 off a medium 
pizza. Present this coupon with 
guest check. Not valid with any 
other offer 

Fxpiration: Mar. 1h ^ 

Pizza inn \ 



Eed. Nite Pitcher Nite - 99 c with the purchase of a large 
tea. 1 pitcher per p.zza please. U4 Hwy j s ^2Sf| 
For pizza out its Pizza InriT— 



Menu for Iberville 
Lunch March 6-14 

Sun: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Fried 
Chicken. 

Mon: Fried Chicken Livers, Red 
Beans & Rice. 

Tues: Sloppy Joe on Bun, Sausage 
& Apples. 

Wed: Chili Dogs, Ham & Cheese 
Omlets. 

Thins: Grilled Bologna & Cheese, 
Baked Spaghetti. 

Fri: Fishwich on Bun, Ground Beef & 
Potato Pie. 

Sat: Breast of Turkey Sandwich, 
Macaroni & Cheese w/Ground Beef. 

Sun: Scrambled Eggs, Corn Beef 
Hash, Roast Pork & Dressing. 

Mon: Corn Dogs, Spanish Rice 
w/Ground Beef. 

Dinner 6-14 

Sun: French Dip Sandwich, Stuffed 
Cabbage Rolls. 

Mon: Taco bar. 

Tues: Roast Turkey & Dressing, 
Beef Stew. 

Wed: Veal Parmesan, Baked Fish. 

Thurs: Steak Night, Fried Shrimp, Y« 
lb. Hamburgers. 

Fri: Sweedish Meatballs. Seafood 
Gumbo. 

Sat: El Ranchero, Sweet & Sour 
Pork. 

Fried Fish Filets, American Style 
Lasagna. 

Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, Pork 
Choppettes. 



On Wednesday evening, 
March 9 the Adult Chapter of 
the Natchitoches Area 
Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes will be sponsoring a 
Mini-Conference at 7:00 P.M. 
at the Wesley Foundation, 520 
College Ave. The featured 
guest for the Mini-Conference 
will be Mr. Emile Evans, State 
Director of the FCA, who will 
be presenting a film on a 
Prayer Breakfast held before 
the 1983 Sugar Bowl game in 
New Orleans. Featured in the 
film are Penn Slate stars Todd 
Blackledge, and Kurt Warner. 
Together, the Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes and Wesley 
Foundation would like to 
encourage the attendance of 
anyone even remotely in- 
terested in the world of sports 
and the Christian faith. 

SLAE 

The Student La. 
Association of Educators held 
their monthly meeting March 
1, at 6:00 in the Reacher 
Education Center. Plans 
were discussed to sell cokes 
March 12 at the Teacher 
Education Center for the PIP 
workshops. Also discussed 
was raffling off $100 with the 
drawing being held on April 
19. Student La. Association 
of Educators State Con- 
vention will be held in Ruston 
and hosted by Grambling 
State University, April 5 at 
6:00 in the Teacher Education 
Center. 



The local Panhellenic 
Association held its meeting 
Wed., March 2. Fall rush was 
the main item in the agenda. 
Panhellenic would like to 
recognize and congratulate 
these girls: Connie Thiels, 
Tri-Sigma; Celeste Covington, 
Ginger Disante, Francis 
Hanks, Penny Craft, Terri 
Morehouse, Paula Simmons 
and Rachelle Williams, Sigma 
Kappa; and Fran Holbert, 
Delta Zeta. We would also 
like to congratulate girls 
honored by installation into 
Rho Lamda, the Panhellenic 
Leadership organization. 
They are: Honorary Members 
Marty Williamson, Tri-Sigma; 
Angela Guillory, Sigma 
Kappa; and Active Members: 
Christine Avant, Delt a Zeta; 
Janice Duggan, Sigma Kappa; 
Deanna Grau, Phi Mu; Kristi 
Heyd, Tri-Sigma; Sherry 
Leyser, Tri-Sigma and Brenda 
Winbarg, Phi Mu. 

International Club 

There will be an 
organizational meeting of the 
International Club in Room 
320 of Kyser Hall on March 
9th at 7:30 p.m. 

All old International Club 
members arc encouraged lo 
attend. 

II yon arc an American 
interested in learning about 
other cultures or a foreign 
student on campus, who 
would like lo meet more 
Americans please come lo this 
very important meeting. 



he Be#t place 
to find a 
helping; hand 
is at the end 
of your arm 




These words to live by have ,in old-fashioned 
ring, but they apply tothe energy situation f.n ing 
us tocl.iy. It seems ( le.ir th.it, if we're to meet our 
growing energy requirements, we must rely on 
the tec hnology at hand. And the m.ijority of 
scientists and energy leaders agree th.it nuclear 
power and coal are the best means of meeting 
these requirements. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

< I ,.„,., | I,-, l,„ I <Nl>|,.,M> 1 .nil M.l»- I hlll.H*. 

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W.Vlv In. Wittiwl.'Vii M.Hn. h.w.r I ."».i|„,f„ 



Opinion 

Current Sauce 
Page 4 

I he Opinions expressed on this pane are striell\ those of Ihe author. I hej 
do not neceessiiril) express the view of this paper, the student Mod) of 
NStl, or (he administration. Ihe Current Sauce aeeepts all articles and 
letters. All eorrespondenee must he signed and a phone number must 
accompany it. dues! editorials are accepted hut the\ loo must he signed. 
Ihe Current Sauce reserves the right to edit anv articles that come into 
our ol lice. deleting anything that may he considered libelous. All articles 
must he turned in no later than Ihe I hursdav preceding publication. 



K.A. Boxing Tournament Needs You 

Granicd, the K.A, Boxing Tournameni for Muscular 
Dystrophy doesn't happen until next week, but James LaCaze, 
who's directing the tournament says that they need boxers to 
hurry and sign up lor the fights now. 

Registration for the tournament, a nationally recognized 
tournameni (see story page I), has been slow thus far. Con- 
sequently, the pleas for registrants have been going out all over 
campus. 

Ii mailers not if you can box, or even if you think you can 
box. Consider your signing up as an act of charity. The more 
fighters we have, the more people will become interested in the 
event, and ihe more money that can be raised for the Muscular 
Dystrophy Association. 

I noticed that there was a Phi Mu-Tri Sigma bout scheduled. 
Great! Those inlcr-fralernity (sorority) bouts always provide the 
most excitement. How about a Kappa Alpha-Kappa Sigma 
bout? How about about an Omega Psj Phi-Kappa Alpha Psi 
fight? How about ANY inter-fraternity (sorority) bbut? 

I.asl year iwo of our most distinguished (&) football players 
laced up ihe gloves and slugged it out for a couple of rounds. 
How about another one of those matches? ' 

Of course, what I'd really like lo see is a battle of the ad- 
min isi rat ion hcay weights. 

Hul really, we need to find some more people to get out and 
box. Il's really for a good cause, and besides, for you macho 
men out I here, you gel to lake your shirt off and parade around 
in front of everybody, showing off those rippling muscles. 

Remember, although the weigh-ins are a week away, now is 
the time to start signing up for the tournament. And for those of 
you who are pacifists and not even considering the physical part 
of the tournament, at least show your face at the events and 
make your donation to a very worthy cause, the Muscular 
Dvslronhv Association j oe Cunningham 



Letter To The Kditor 

Mr. Cunningham, 

I think that this could 
probably be as good of a place 
as any to take advantage of my 
priveleges as a reader to 
protest against what was 
written in the last issue of the 
Current Sauce since this is' 
obviously the publication in 
which to do so. 1 am rep- 
sonding to your article 
published in the March 1, 1983 
issue of Current Sauce. It was 
titled "Quick Congratulations 
and Other Stuff". It should 



SGA Amendment 



Will Kl AS, ItK NSU Rodeo I Vain has 
contributed much local aiul national 
recognition lo Not i ImoU'i u, and 

Will Kl as, the NSU kodco Team has won 
many Illinois anil award*, while rcnrcxcnlhiu 
Noitliwcslct n, and 

WIII Kt AS. Ihe NSU Rodeo team lias 
helped Northwestern hy enlarging ihe 
enrollment ol Ihe student hody IsWougll their 
own sdr-gcncrated funds and through ihe fine 
reputation which the NSU Rodeo team 
developed throughout the country, and 

Will Rl AS. the NSU Rodeo ream will 
hcitctil the uimetsiiy and Ihe student body, 
through Ihe establishment ol the Rodeo Arena 



on Campus which hold many student activities 
inetuding the NSU Student Rodeo, and 

WIILRt AS. The NSU Rodeo Team, which 
currently survives strictly on private 
donations, would be able to continue its fine 
performance, and grow in ihe future through 
financial supnon of the NSU Student Body. 

till R1IORI BE IT RESOt VLD. that Ihe 
student Government Association respectfully 
request thai the Northwestern Stale University 
Rodeo Team receive a SI. 00 sludent self- 
assessed lee from all lull time students at- 
tending lite Nalehinvlies campus I'm a period 
ol lour years effective the summer session ol" 
1*83. 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Kditor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 
News Kditor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 



Advertising Manager 
Charlene Klvers 

Co-Kocus Kditor 
Pat Skid inure 

Asst. News Editor 
Diana Gralton 



Business Manager 
David Saylors 

Co-Kocus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 



Photographer 
Mclanie Daigle 

Current Sauce is the official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State 
Univeruty in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 
newipapcr is catered at second cum matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March J. 117*. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning in the fall and spring semester with 
ihe exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times, Highway 1 
South. Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224*. Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357-5456- 

Currenl Sauce subscriptions are $4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
through the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Circulation Manager 
Dean Napoli 

Advisor 
Krank Presson 



Sauce, and should be mailed to Current SatK- 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent ihe viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern 

Letters to the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication. 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3579 to Current 
Sauce. NSU, Natchitoches, Louisiana. 71457. 



have been titled "Extremely 
Quick Congratulations and 
My Personal Vendetta Against 
Ed Dupuis." 

There is no doubt in my 
mind that Janice Williams will 
be an excellent editor for the 
Potpourri, and you are to be 
commended for striving for a 
good relationship between the 
Current Sauce and the Pot- 
pourri. However, one must 
not accuse others of doing 
what he himself has mastered 
as an art. It seems as though 
our editor of the Current 
Sauce used the Current Sauce 



for his personal vendettas as a 
form of "get back". Could 
this be so? Yes, I think so. I 
didn't want to be the one to 
break it to you Joe, but I 
believe that dream you had 
about editorializing being 
"left to those mediums on this 
campus which can present 
both sides of a veiw", will 
remain a dream unt:'! you learn 
how to use a publication much 
more wisely. 



Leisa Kennedy 
Sophomore 



...And Another 

Mr. Cunningham, 

Your editorial which ap- 
peared in the March 1 edition 
of the Current Sauce in my 
opionion is headed by a 
misleading statement. Instead 
of using the headline "Quick 
Congratulations and Other 
Stuff," perhaps you should 
have titled it "My personal 
feelings about Ed Dupuis as 
Editor of POTPOURRI." 

In this editorial, you 
mention poor relations bet- 
ween Current Sauce and 
POTPOURRI and SGA and 
POTPOURRI. It's really a 
shame that you had to hide 
behind your publication with 
this statement. I have won- 
derful relations with the 
Current Sauce and receive it's 
complete cooperation every 
Tuesday while reading it. It is 
not the Current Sauce and 
POTPOURRI that have 
relation problems, it is you 
and I who have our dif- 
ferences. I don't have to or 
want to hide behind the 
POTPOURRI with that 
statement. As for the SGA, I 
seem to have no problems with 
that body as a whole, it is Joe 
Stamey and I who have our 
differences. He, unlike you, 
did not use his office or the 
SGA to hide behind to express 



his disapproval of the*" 1982 
POTPOURRI. While I did 
not enjoy the face to face 
confrontation that occurred, 1 
can certainly respect him for 
doing it. You however, speak 
of my allegedly using the 
POTPOURRI as a vector for 
personal vendetta. I cannot 
respect a hypocrite. 

Concerning the "con- 
troversial" and editorial" 
statements in the 1982 
POTPOURRI to which you 
allude, I assume that you are 
referring to the stories on the 
SGA and Current Sauce which 
I authored and which are 
included in the Organizations 
section of the book. The story 
on the SGA states no opinions 
and is in no way an editorial. 
It is simply a collection of 
facts concerning the SGA 
impeachment of Diana Kemp 
recorded for posterity. The 
story on the Current Sauce 
states an opinion, but it is one 
which, as you are well aware, 
was voiced by many students 
on campus - the large number 
of errors in your publication. 
Both of these stories were 
included because they were the 
major events surrounding the 
respective organizations for 
the year. I should remind you 
that a yearbook has an 
obligation to the students to 
record the events of the year, 



whether they be good or bad. 

As for your statement that I 
was placed in charge of the 

1982 POTPOURRI following 
the illness of the editor, Jim 
McKellar, this statement is 
totally erronious. I was never 
in command of the 1982 
POTPOURRI. My position 
was that of section editor and 
remained so until my ap- 
pointment as editor of the 

1983 POTPOURRI. Russell 
Williams was managing editor 
of the 1982 POTPOURRI, 
and although the "buck" was 
never officially passed, he was 
next in command. Jim 
McKellar, however, personally 
checked and edited every 
proof sheet that was sent to us 
by our publisher and in this 
fashion remained editor. The 
two stories mentioned above 
bore his approval as editor. 
The SGA story was even sent 
to the publisher approximately 
one month before his illness. 

There is little that I can do 
or care to do to change your 
opinion of mt or the POT- 
POURRI. I must say, 
however, that you and those 
who share your opinion have 
no role in my future, and 
consequently, your opinions 
mean little to me. 

Sincerely, 

Ed Dupuis, Editor 

1983 POTPOURRI 



...And The Rebuttal 

Dear Mr. Dupuis, 

Welcome to the world of the 
"Free Press". It was very 
considerate of you to respond 
so quickly to my editorial. In 
doing so, you proved the exact 
point of the editorial. 

I assure you that my 
editorial should not have been 
entitled, "My Personal 
Feelings About Ed Dupuis..." 
I can safely say that those were 
not my personal feelings 
towards you. 

The editorial stated simply 
that a yearbook is not a place 
where personal feelings should 
influence the content of the 
book, because there is no place 
in that particular yearbook for 
a rebuttal. 

In your letter you go on to 
dispute my claim that there 
were bad relations between the 
Current Sauce and the Pot- 
pourri by saying that the bad 
feelings were between you and 
me. I have two questions. If 
that is so, then how come, (1) I 
wasn't informed that there 



were bad relations between 
you and me before the 
yearbook came out (there 
didn't seem to be any bad 
relations when members of the 
Potpourri staff came into my 
office asking if they could 
have old pictures that we had 
already used), and (2) instead 
of just saying something 
derogatory about me, you 
took a cheap shot at the entire 
Current Sauce? Yes, Virginia, 
the entire Current Sauce in- 
cludes each one of my staff 
members. 

Also, you say that there 
were no bad relations with the 
SGA, only with Joe Stamey, 
yet, when the Potpourri came 
out, you focused the attention 
on the SGA as a whole, 
sensationalizing one un- 
fortunate issue, and totally 
ignoring the many, many, 
positive things that Mr. 
Stamey' s administration did 
for the students at NSU. 

Mr. Dupuis, you contradict 
yourself. For shame. 

Ed, we could go on and on, 
but, it would do little good. In 



my opinion, you abused your 
power with the Potpourri by 
initiating a personal vendetta 
against the Current Sauce and 
the SGA by authoring per- 
sonally biased statements, 
when you knew full well that 
we could not reply with a 
rebuttal in your yearbook. 
Who does it look like is hiding 
now? 

Furthermore, I recom- 
mended that the editorializing 
be left up to those mediums 
who could present both sides 
of the story. Whereby, y° u 
promptly proved my point by 
writing a rebuttal to the 
Current Sauce, of the article 
that was printed in the Current 
Sauce, which you felt was 
offensive. It's a pity that the 
Current Sauce and the SGA 
were not given the same 
consideration in the P ot " 
pourrri. 
Mr. Dupuis, it now appear* 



as though the finger 



of 



hypocrisy is pointing 

right 

back at you. 

Sincerely, 

Joe Cunningham 



Demons 



Ladv Demons 



Sports 



Softball 



Current Sauce 

Page 5 
March 8. 1983 



Lady Demons Hoping For Bid 



Hale, Martin, Madlock 
Named All-Conference 



Northwestern senior guard 
Kenny Hale and senior center 
Johnny Martin have been 
named to the Trans America 
Conference second all- 
conference team. The Trans 
America all-league team for 
1982-83 was announced 
Wednesday by the conference 
office. 

For both Hale and Martin, 
the second team was a move 
up from the honorable 
mention list of a year ago. 
Both were also named on the 
10 man pre-season all league 
team. Senior forward Calvin 
Madlock was named on the 
honorable mention list also for 
the Demons. 

The first team consisted of 
Willie Jackson of Centenary, 
Vaughn Williams of 
Arkansas-Litte Rock, Craig 
Beard of Samford, Tony 
Gattis of Mercer and Anicet 
Lavodrama. Jackson was 
named to the first team for the 
third straight year. 

Joining Martin and Hale on 
the second unit were Jimmy 
Lampley and Mike Rivers 
from Arkansas-Little Rock 
and Larry Hollins of Houston 
Baptist. Eight of the 10 players 
°n the two units were also 
named on the pre-season team 
jabbed by coaches and sports 
information directors from 
around the league. 

Hale is the top Demon 
scorer on the season with a 
16.6 average. He was second 
°n the team in scoring last 



season and this year is 
shooting 47.8 percent from the 
field and made 81.3 percent of 
his free throws. At the end of 
the regular season Hale ranked 
fourth in the league in scoring. 
Hale, along with Williams on 
the first team, were the only 
two guards on the first two 
teams. Hale's high game of 32 
points came this season 
against Georgia Southern in a 
78-62 Demon win. 

Martin is third on the 
Northwestern team in scoring 
with an average of 14.2 points 
per game and he leads the 
NSU rebounding with a 6.9 
average. Martin missed four 
games during the season 
because of an emergency 
surgery for a hernia, but was 
out for only 30 days. Martin is 
shooting 51.8 percent from the 
field and 72.8 percent from the 
free throw line and also leads 
the team with 29 blocked 
shots. Martin has a high game 
of 26 points against Centenary 
and 14 rebounds against 
Lousisiana College. 

Madlock earned honorable 
mention status after a very 
consistent season in which he 
has averaged 15.1 points and 
6.6 rebounds per game, in- 
cluding a high game of 27 
points and 10 rebounds in a 
77-75 win over Centenary. 
Earlier this season Madlock 
was named to the District 
Three Academic All-American 
basketball team. 



* 

* 
* 

* 



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Northwestern Lady Demon 
basketball Coach Pal Pierson 
currently has her team on 
hold, hoping thai the Lady 
Demons might receive a bid to 
the Converse Women's 
National Invitational 
Tournament. 

The Lady Demons ended 
the regular season with a 16-9 
record, having a three-game 
winning streak snapped 
Saturday in an 86-76 loss ai 
the University of Arkansas. 
1982-83 marks the fourih 
straight winning season for 
Coach Pierson and her Lady 
Demons. 

The Lady Demons are one 
of several teams being con- 
sidered for the NW1T, an 
eight-ieam tournament held 
each of the past 15 years in 
Amarillo, Texas. This is ihe 
first year that the tournament 
has been sponsored by ihe 
Converse company. 

"We had some good 
conversations with the people 
there and they do have a 
strong interest in us," said 
Pierson. "But we won't know 
until probably early next week 
on what teams they invite." 

Until then, Pierson and her 
squad will have to wait and see 
while getting some hard 
earned rest and relaxation 
after the 25-game regular 
season schedule. 

"I think we had a very good 
season," added Pierson, who 
has a record of 87-56 after five 
seasons at Northwestern. "We 
played with a lot of players 
this season, and played against 
some of the top teams in the 
country." 

Although the Lady Demons 
did not beat any teams 
currently in the top 20, they 
always put up a battle. 
Cheyney State, ranked in the 
top five all season, defeated 
the Lady Demons by just nine 
points and Southeastern 
Conference power Alabama 
won by only seven. Late in the 
season it took a basket with 
three seconds left for highly- 
regarded Stephen F. Austin to 
escape with a one point win. 

During the season the Lady 
Demons posted an impressive 
9-2 record against other teams 
from the state, and late in the 
season avenged one of those 
two losses while knocking off 
Southland Conference 
champion Northeast 
Louisiana by 12 points. 

One of the bright spots 
about the 1982-83 team is that 
all but one player, forward 
Stephanie Washington, will be 
back for the 1983-84 team. 
"We will certainly miss 
Stephanie's leadership and her 
scoring and rebounding 
ability," admitted Pierson. 
"But with a year of added 
experience for our other 
players, and if we can recruit 
well, we should have a strong 
team next season." 




Tandra Lewis (with ball) and I onnie Banks (10) two 

of the Lady Demons sensational freshman basket hall 
are waiting along with eoaehes Pal Pierson, James 
Smith, and the rest of the Lady Demons for an in- 
vitation to the National Womens Invitation Tour- 
nament in Amarillo, Texas. According to Pierson, 
the chances are good that NSU will be invited. 



This season balance was the 
key to the Northwestern attack 
as four players averaged in 
double figures, two of those 
four being freshmen. 
Washington led ihe way with a 
19 point per game average and 
she now ranks as the fifth 
leading scorer in Lady Demon 
history. 

Tracy Taylor averaged 16.9 
points and was the lop 
rebounder at 7.6 per game. 
Rookie point guard Teressa 
Thomas averaged 11.4 poinis 
and nearly five assists per 
game and freshman guard 
Lonnie Banks scored 10.1 
points per outing. 

"I think the most important 
thing for us this season was the 
play of our freshmen," noted 
Pierson. "We knew what our 
veterans could do, but we 
knew we would depend on the 
new players. 1 think they just 
played great all season, 
especially when you look back 
at some of the teams and 
players that they had to go 
against." Along with Thomas 
and Banks the Lady Demons 
got strong play from rookie 
forward Val Williams and 
guard Tandra Lewis, although 
Lewis was bothered most of 



(he season by a knee injury. 

"I think this is Ihe most 
enjoyable year I have had as a 
coach because of I he players 
wc had," added Pierson. 



S.U. Cafeteria 
March 7-11 

Mon: Red Bears & Rice. Turkey 
Fritter, Roast Pork. 

Tues: Spanish Macaroni, Liver & 
Onions, Fried Pork Chops. 

Wed: Beef Stew, Veal Parmesan, 
Chicken & Dumplings. 

Thurs: Fried Chicken, Roast Beef. 
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce. 

Fri: Ham, Macaroni & Cheese, Fried 
Catfish, Sweet & Sour Pork. 

Specials for S.U. Cafeteria 

(Lunch Only) 

Mon: Red Beans 8 Rice, Med Drink 
& Small Salad »2" 

Tues: Spanish Macaroni, Small 
Salad, Medium Drink '•2"" 

Wed: Free Medium Soft Drink with 
Purchase ot Jumbo w/cheese & 
French Fries. 

Thurs: Spaghetti & Meat Sauce, 
Small Salad, Med. Sort Drink l 2". 

Fri: Ham, Macaroni & Cheese, Small 
Salad, Med Drink '2". 

Due to delivery schedules menus 
are subject to change without 
notice. 



The Current Sauce, March 8, 1983, Page 6 



D 



Intramural Basketball Heads For Playoffs 



During the final week of 
intramural basketball the 
divisional races tightened and 
many teams started and ended 
their run for the playoffs. 

On monday night YANG 
1000 took it's unbeaten record 
to the court to play Rapides 
Knights. With Rodney Thrash 
and Jerry Norvell combining 
for 30 points, YANG 1000 
whipped the Knights 55-38. 
Jarvis Shaw was the games 
leading scorer with 20. 

The Lakers also assured 
themselves of a playoff spot as 
they used a I3-point difference 
in second-half scoring to down 
(he Maffia 49-35. Odessa 
Turner paced the Lakers with 
15 and Victor Oatis followed 
with. 12. 

B.S.U. outscored YANG I 
27-18 in the first half to coasi 
10 a 51-42 victory. Although 
YANG started wiih only four 
players, ihcv were never far 
off the pace. YANG's Joe 
Cunningham was the game's 
leading scorer with 16. 

Armadillos crushed Conine 
2 by 20 points as they rolled to 
a 67-47 loss. That's right, with 
just a few minutes to play, the 
Armadillos were winning 67- 
47 before they got their third 
technical foul, which meant 
they had to forfeit. 

Omega I'si Phi downed 
K.A. 56-46 behind Floyd 
James' 15 points. Chris 
Maggio led K.A. with 12. 
B.S.U. outscored Phi Mu 30- 
13 in lite first half to record a 
44-30 triumph. Plij Mu lost its 
second game of I he night as 
they were downed 30-28 b\ 
Od yssey. 

On Tuesday nighl Conine 
defeated 10 Blind Hoys 37-30 
behind Charles Jackson's 12 

Canoe Shed Hours 
Monday 3:00-5:30 
Tuesday 3:30-5:30 
Wednesday 3:00-5:30 
Thursday 3:30-5:30 
Friday 2:00-4:00 



points. Pat Chamberlain also 
hit 12 for 10 Blind Boys. 

B.S.U. won its second game 
in as many nights as they 
edged by Armadillos 57-54. 
Although B.S.U. came out the 
victors, Armadillos boasted 
leading scorer Terry Mobley, 
who hit 26 points. 

A few hours later Mobley 
was the leading scorer in the 
Armadillos' 17 point victory 
over Kingpins. Mobley 
connected for 22 points in the 
second game as his team won 
50-33. 

In their second game of the 
night 10 Blind Boys destroyed 
Knockernuts by a 51-25 count. 

Shortly after that F.A.S.T. 
picked up where 10 Blind Boys 
left off as they also beat 
Knockernuts 44-32. Bogie 
Pattori paced F.A.S.T. with 16 
points. 

YANG 1000 probably had 
its toughest fight of the season 
as they slipped by D.H. 47-44. 
Rodney Thrash again led 
YANG 1000 as he tossed in 13 
points. Scott Smith led D.H. 



with 19. 

Kappa Sig eased by Sig Tau 
30-28 as Mike Camden hit 14 
points. 

On Wednesday night, the 
Lakers used Barry Hamilton's 

12 points to get by Rapides 
Knights. 47-41. Keith 
Washington scored 21 for the 
Knights. 

D.H. just did get by Conine 
as they recorded a 34-32 
victory despite Rick Sch- 
weitzer's 14 points for Conine. 
Conine II also took it on the 
chin, becoming the victims of 
a 62-51 Knockernuts victory. 

Dwayne Poe hit 20 as the 10 
Blind Boys second team 
downed the Buffalo Patrol 51- 
33. 10 Blind Boys I whipped 
F.A.S.T. 49-29. 

Sigma Kappa edged Phi Mu 
in a tense game, 50-49 and 
Ulysses Frank hit 15 to lead 
Kappa Alpha Psi to a victory. 

Kappa Sig downed TKE 38- 

13 as Cliff Poinbeuf and Kevin 
Barthalomew each hit 10 
points. 



A STEP BEYOND 
SCIENCE FICTION. 




March 10 & 11 
7:30 pm Kyser 



! 



SGA Elections March 16th 

Five executive positions and 1 1 senators will 
be elected to the SGA. Also on the ballot will 
be seven Representative at Large positions 
for -the SUGB. Pick up applications for 
elections in SGA office or Dean of Students 
Office in the Student Union. Deadline for 
applying is Friday March 4th at 4:00 pm. No 
applications will be accepted after this time. 
Apply Now!! 



YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN 
OFFICER'S COMMISSION 
IN THE ARMY. 

Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also 
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our 
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities, 
P.O. Box 7711 Burbank, CA 91510. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



Attention Students 

Financial Aid Application "Changes" 
For 1983-84 

Students may now choose between two 
applications in order to apply for Federal 
Student Aid (Pell Grant, SEOG, CUS, and 
NOSL) for the 1983-84 academic year. 
Students may file the application for Federal 
Student Aid (Formerly BEOG application) or 
they may file the ACT Financial Aid Ap- 
plications. 

The application for Federal Student Aid does 
not require a fee and takes 8 to 10 weeks for 
processing. The ACT application requires a 
$6 fee and 'takes 4-6 weeks for processing. 
The deadlines for awarding aid are April 1, for 
the Summer Session, and June 1 , for the Fall 
Semester and November 1, for the Spring. (If 
funds are available). 




Little Chicago 

/ If a Presents 

Ronnie Brumley 





\ & Fire . . 

Playing your favorites - /J** 
Tuesday thru Saturday 



New Nightly Specials 



Tuesday is 

The All New Beer Bust 



Wednesday is 

Ladies Night 



Af 
base 
thwei 
timel 
to de 
5 lasi 
Mule 
seven 
and s 

Nc 
the s 
Cent i 
secor 
Cent i 
l on i 

In 
visitc 
first ; 
on j 



and Thursday is 

Raise Hell Night 

Friday & Saturday 
The Best Week-End Party Around 
is at Little Chicago 



The Hottest Sound Around at 
The Newest Club In Town 

Ronnie Brumley & Fire 

at 

Little Chicago 

620 Hwy. 1 South 352-4793 

(formerly Bojangles) 
Proper Attire & I.D. Required. 



The Current Sauce, March 8, 1983, Page 7 



Demon Baseballers Split With 
Central Missouri Mules, 7-2, 10-5 



After leaving ten men on 
base in the opener, Nor- 
thwestern came up with some 
timely hits in the second game 
to defeat Central Missouri 10- 
5 last Monday afternoon. The 
Mules scored three runs in the 
seventh inning of the opener 
and scored a 7-2 win. 

Northwestern is now 6-6 on 
the season after splitting with 
Central Missouri for the 
second straight day and 
Central Missouri stands at 5-6- 
1 on its Southern tour. 

In the first contest the 
visitors scored two runs in the 
first and one in the second, all 
on just one hit, thanks to 



walks and one Demon error. 
Central Missouri added a run 
in the sixth and three in the 
seventh, two of those on a 
home run by Doug Middleton. 

Northwestern got on the 
scoreboard in the third inning 
when Jerry Norvell singled, 
stole second, and scored on a 
double by David Reynolds. In 
the fifth catcher David Grappe 
hit his second home run of the 
season for the Demons. 

Northwestern scored two 
runs in the first inning and five 
in the second to quickly gain 
control of the nightcap. In the 
first' innings Reynolds had a 
two-run double and then in the 



third he added a sacrifice fly. 

Also in the second Grappe 
added a single to drive in two 
runs and Steve Graf added a 
sacrifice fly. In the third Gil 
Herndon added a two-run 
double for the Demons and 
Norvell followed with a 
sacrifice fly ater Herndon 
advanced to third. 

Northwestern's Joe Jackson 
went the distance in the second 
game to improve his record to 
2-0 on the season, both wins 
coming over Central Missouri. 
In the first game for the 
Demons Mike Vienne was the 
starter and loser and he stands 
at 0-1. 



nsu SPRING FLING! 



More Than A Week of Activities 



March 12-20 



USING ONLY 
THE BEST 
MEATS 



^fcADA^fs 

HICKORY HUT 

BAR B Q 
RESTAURANT 



342a Hwy, 1 South 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 
TELEPHONE 318/352-3720 

We Are A Member of the NSU Booster Club 



CA TEW NO 
SERVICE 
AVAILABLE 

(Contact Daman Brumley. 
Manager) 



PLATES 

regular large 

COMBINATION $4.95 $5 95 

BEEF $3.75 $4 75 

RIBS $3.49 $4 75 

PORK $3.49 $4 75 

SAUSAGE $3.49 $4 75 

H AM $3.49 $4.75 

CHICKEN $3.49 $4 75 

(includes 2 side orders) 



SANDWICHES 



BEEF 

SAUSAGE 
PORK. . . . 
HAM 



regular po-boy 

$225 $295 

$185 $2 75 

$185 $2.75 

$185 $2.75 



SIDE ORDERS 



Individual Serving . 
Pints 



$ .75 
$1.50 



Cole Slaw, Potato Salad, Baked Beans, Dirty Rice, Fried Okra & Squash 



FAMILY MAC PAKS - For Family of Four 



2 Pounds of Beef $1 7.40 

2 Pounds (app.) Rib Rack $13 49 



2 Pounds of Ham or Pork $14.40 

1 Large Chicken $ 6.79 

"Mac Paks" include: 1 pint each of Potato Salad, Baked Beans, Cole Slaw, and rolls with McAdam's fabulous 
bar-b-que sauce 



BY THE POUND (Chicken by the bird. app. 3 lbs.) 



BEEF 

RIBS. 
PORK 



$7.50 'SAUSAGE $4.50 

S4_95 HAM $5.95 

$.595 CHICKEN $4.25 



Drive thru Window Special 
Sloppy Mac, Tater Tots & 
Soft Drink M.99 

Your favorite beverage on tap' 

All orders come without sauce, we supply it. you apply it! 

We do custom cooking of Hams and Turkeys' 

Call Ahead for really prompt service on take-out orders! 



All NSU Students Get 10% Discount with NSU ID. 



Demon, Lady Demon Netters Remain 
Undefeated After Sweeping SFA 7-2 



Northwestern's men's and 
women's tennis teams both 
remained perfect on the season 
here last Monday afternoon as 
both the Demons and Lady 
Demons scored 7-2 wins over 
Stephen F. Austin. 

The Northwestern men lost 
only at No. 4 singles and at 
No. I doubles as they im- 
proved to 3-0 on the season. 
Only Donny Lovo at No. 3 
singles for the Demons was 
forced to go three sets as he 
scored a 2-6,6-0,6-4 win over 
Steve Ktza. In No. I singles 
NSU's Jorge Salkeld defeated 
Jack Sheehy by a 6-3,7-6. 

In doubles action Salkeld 
and Lytt Allen lost the No. I 
match to SFA's Sheehy and 
Scott Koth. At No. 2 doubles 



Lovo and Hugo Molina won 
in straight sets for Nor- 
thwestern and at No. 3 
Francisco Acuna and Jorge 
Salvo won in three sets for the 
Demons. 

In women's action Nor- 
thwestern improved to 2-0 on 
the season by taking a 7-2 win, 
losing only at No. I and at No. 
2 singles, both of those in 
three sets. At No. 3 singles 
Begonia Fabregas won by a 6- 

2.6- 3 score and at No. 6 Kim 
Tollett scored a 6-0,6-3 win. 

In doubles Liliana Isaza and 
Myra Salano won the No. I 
match in three sets and Pam 
Aud and Karla Tubbs won a 6- 

2.7- 5 decision at No. 2 doubles 
while Tollett and Fabregas 
received a forfeit. 



Demon Kodeoers Winners 
In Southern Region Meet 



Northwestern timed-event 
specialists Brian Thomas ot 
Natchitoches, La., and Jeb 
Barney of Beckville, Tex., 
were short go-round winners 
at the Southern 
Region/National In- 
tercollegiate Rodeo 
Association rodeo Feb. 24-26 
in San Marcos, Tex. 

Thomas, the second go- 
round winner in team roping 
at the 1 982 College National 
Finals Rodeo, won the calf 
roping finals at the Southwesi 
Texas State University rodeo 
with a lime of 10.09 seconds. 
The NWSTU junior was 
eighth in the long go-round 
with a 12.6-sccond effort and 
finished third in the average 
with a lime of 22.69 seconds 
on two head. 

Barney also placed fourth in 
the long go-round of steer- 
wrestling with his 5.27-second 
effort, but received no time in 
the finals. Thomas, who led 
the Southern Region in 
steerwrestling after fire 
rodeos, was 5.84 seconds for 
ninth in the long go-round and 
15.16 seconds in the finals lor 
eighth. 

Helping the Northwestern 
State men's team to third place 
in the team standings at the 
San Marcos rodeo was 
sophomore Shawn of Eunice, 
La., in bareback bronc riding. 
He scored 69 points to place 
fifth in the long go-round, 68 
points to finish second in (he 



short go-round and tied Tom 
Hickey of Sam Houston Stale 
University for second place in 
the average with 137 points on 
(wo head. 

Porter Craig of Zachary, 
(he NWSTU sophomoe who 
was second in Soulhern 
Region bareback bronc riding 
after five contest, failed to 
make the finals at San Marcos. 

In bull riding, NWSTU 
freshman Ronnie Walters of 
Coushaila, la., scored 67 
points to finish seventh in the 
long go-round, 70 points to 
place third in the finals and his 
137 points on two bulls gave 
him fourth in the average. He 
was the fourth-ranked bull 
rider after five rodeos. 

Craig also made it to the 
finals in bull riding. He scored 
66 points to tic Buddy Lewis 
of Slephcn F. Austin Stale 
University for 10th place in the 
long go-round and his 68 
points in the finals were good 
for fourth-place money. 

NWSTU saddle bronc rider 
Joey Howze, freshman from 
Denham Springs, La., scored 
57 points in the long go-round 
to lie Chad Craigan of Lamar 
University for sixth place. 
Howze received no score in the 
finals. 

The next Southern 
Rcgion/NIRA rodeo for 
Northwestern Slate will be 
March 4-5 at Texas A and I 
University in Kingsville, Tex. 



Front Street Gym 



612 Front Street 
Phone 352 8678 
1 1 9 Daily 

Instructions for 
men and women 



Samra 
Nutrition 

Powerlifting & Bodybuilding 

Lifting, Gloves, Belts, Wraps, Straps, Suits 



The Curre nt Sauce, March 8, 1983, Page 8 
r— — ■ 



More Than A 
Week of Activities 




Sat., March 12 

l-M Softball Tournament, I M Field 
Complex; Demon Relays, Track 
Complex. 



Sun., March 13 

I M Softball Tournament; 
Concert, 3 pm Recital Hall. 



SUGB Video 14th -18th 
In Addition 



Dance 



Mon., March 14 

l-M Softball, l-M Fields; Demon 
Baseball, Host A-Prof (bring your 
favorite professor to the game), 1 :1 5 
Baseball Field; Play "Virginia Woolf". 
7 pm West Theatre; SUGB Air Band 
Contest, 8 pm S.U. Ballroom. 



Tues., March 15 

l-M Softball; Choral Large Ensemble 
Festival; Demon Tennis, 2 pm Tennis 
Comdex; Plav "Viroinia Woolf", SUGB 
Mime Tim Settimi, 7 pm S.U. Ballroom. 



Wed., March 16 

l-M Softball; SUGB "Williams & Ree" 
Comedy Team; 12 noon, S.U.; Play 
"Virginia Woolf"; Demon Track; Lady 
Demon Softball, 3 pm Highland; KA 
MDA Boxing Tournament, 7:30 pm l-M 
Bldg. 



Thurs., March 17 

l-M Softball; "Edward Albee" Dist. 
Lecture Series, 9:30 am Kyser; Play 
"Virginia Woolf"; KA MDA Boxing; l-M 
Crazy Games, 12 2 Front of S.U.; Ski 
Team Demonstration, 3:30 Chaplan's 
Lake. 



Sat., 19th 



Bass Tournament, Sibley Lake 5 am. 
MO person. 



Fri., March 18 

Golf Tournament, 1 2:30 Tee Time J 1 
1 person; Demon Tennis, 1 pm Tennis 
Complex; Play "Virginia Woolf"; SUGB 
Battle of the D.J.'s, 5-9 Rec Complex, 
Snack Bar will be open. 



Sun., March 20 

Demon Baseball, 2 pm; NSU 
Concert, 3 pm Recital Hall. 



Band 



Spring Fling 
Specials 



Bookstore 



Frisbees 75 c 
Can Coolers *1 00 



S.U. Games 

Tues. & Wed. - Free Pool 

from 5-10 with ID 
Wed. - 50 c Bowling 
from 5-9:30 with ID 



S.U. Beauty Shop 



$ 5 00 Haircuts 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX March 22. 1983 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




No. 21 



Grau, Repp In SGA Run-Off 



Deana Grau and Scott Repp 
are thrust into a run-off 
election for the Student 
Government Association 
Presidential slot vacated by 
two-term president Joe 
Stamey. 

Vice-Presidential candidates 
Perry Anderson and Noel 
Nicolle also survived the first 
round elections and they will 
appear on the Wednesday 
ballot for the position vacated 
by Stacy Soileau. 

Soileau, the acting Com- 
missioner of Elections, said 
some 712 students voted on 
the Natchitoches campus 
March 16, with "about 
100','voters being tallied at 
Warrington and "only 4" at 
ADOS. 

In the presidential election, 
Repp garnered 221 votes to 
210 for Grau. Harlan Harvey 
and John Williams ran closely 
behind. 

In the election for vice- 
president, Nicolle recieved 210 
votes to Anderson's 208. Bob 
Pearce and Donna Jp Kelly 



trailed. 

A total of 431 votes enabled 
Joe Cunningham to claim the 
office of SGA Treasurer, 
previously held by Larry Hall. 
Stacy Baumgardner, who 
received 470 votes, was elected 
Commissioner of Elections, an 
office vacated by Harlan 
Harvey. 

in the race for eleven 
Senator-at-Large positions, 
the following were elected: 
Tommy Abrusely, Brunetta 
Anthony, Todd Eppler, 
Deanna Fredieu, Eileen 
Haynes, Saundra Lamb, Chris 
Maggio, Beth McMillian, Lisa 
Morse, Greg Shoalmire, and 
Shaun Wyble. 

Also appearing on the 
ballots Wednesday will be six 
candidates in the election for. 
four Representative-at-Large 
positions on the Student 
Union Governing Board. The 
candidates are Stacy 
Scroggins, James Hartline, 
Joy Pilie, Beth Sandiford, 
Marvin Cruz and Rhonda 
Lamb. 




Graduation Compromise 



A compromise regarding 
N SU commencements was 
reached last week by President 
? r ze, NSU students, and 
(acuity. 

Instead of the previously 
Pr °posed single com- 
mencement per year, there will 
De two ceremonies, both held 
J? Pother Coliseum, - one in 

e fall and spring semesters, 
^raduates'names will be 
announced and a reception for 
graduates, families, and guests 
s also planned to follow. 



According to SGA 
President Joe Stamey, two 
bills were passed at the March 
14 SGA meeting, one of which 
concerned NSU com- 
mencements. Bill number 1 1, 
sponsored by Dean Napoli, 
was to hold three com- 
mencement ceremonies per 
year. Another provision of the 
bill stated that graduates' 
names be announced. In 
addition, the bill asked for a 
reception following the 
graduation ceremony. 




Everybody won at the Kappa Alpha- 
Muscular Dystrophy Association 
boxing tournament held last Wed- 
nesday in Prather Colesium. The 
tournament raised over $14,000 for 



the area MDA. Shown here are tue 
actual winners and the runncrs-up in 
the two-day tournament which drew 
large crowds and was well worth il 
with the intensity of the boxing. 



Kappa Alpha Boxing Tourney 
Raises Thousands For MD 



Eight experienced Nor- 
thwestern students won 
championships Thursday 
night during the finals of the 
ninth annual Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity Boxing Tour- 
nament for Muscular 
Dystrophy in Prather 
Coliseum at NSU. 

The combined attendance 
for the tournament, which 
raised more tha 14,000 for the 
Northwest Louisiana- Texar- 
kana chapter of the national 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Association during its first 
sight years. 

"I just want to say thanks to 
the people from the city of 
Natchitoches, in Natchitoches 
Parish, and the surrounding 
area for helping make this the 
most successful tournament in 
the history of this great event 
for charity," said Lacaze. 

He added, "But our most 
sincere appreciation goes to 
the students of Northwestern 
who got into the ring and 
demonstrated a tremendous 
amount of courage. They 
threw and took a lot of 
punches, and when it was over 
most of the participants said 
the experience had been fun. 



For two nights, these students 
gave the public some real 
excitement and en- 
tertainment." 

The heavyweight cham- 
pionship of the 1983 tour- 
nament was won by Charles 
James, 205, of Bossier City. 
The senior pre-law major 
defeated 295-pound Don Hill 
of St. Louis when the referee 
stopped the fight in the second 
round. 

Oliver "Sugar Rat" Chairs, 
150-pound sophomore 
electronic engineering major 
from Kenner defeated 
sophomore Sharlon Barnes, 
155 of Zachary for the light 
welterweight title when the 
referee stopped the bout in the 
second round. 

The lightweight division 
champion was William 
Carnahan, 145, of 
Cloutierville. The senior 
accounting major won a 
unanimous decision against 
sophomore Rafael Ramirex, 
140, of Puerto Rico. 

Freshman Michael Bell, 
165-pound business major 
i from Alexandria, won the 
light middleweight cham- 
pionship when his bout with 



freshman Robert Delrie, 175, 
of Natchitoches was stopped 
by the referee in the second 
round. Delrie sustained torn 
ligaments in the right 
shoulder. 

The featherweight cham- 
pion is sophomore Rodney 
Hendricks, 134, of Bossier 
City, who defeated Roland 
Baker, 132, of Glenmora when 
the referee stopped their bout 
in the first round. 

LeRoy Ellis, 183-pound 
sophomore general studies 
major from Troup, Texas, 
won a unanimous decision 
over freshman Ken McLaren, 
of Campti for the mid- 
dleweight championship. 

Tandra Lewis, 120-pound 
freshman history major from 
Zachary, won one of the 
tournament's two bouts 
featuring women students at 
Northwestern. She was a 
unanimous decision winner 
against junior Debbie Gard- 
ner, 115, of Coushatta. 

In probably the best of 
Thursday night's cham- 
pionship bouts, 115-pound 
freshman Delia Roberts of 
Campti won a unanimous 
decision in her match with 
freshman Reatha Cole. 



L The Current Sauce, March 22, 1983, Page 2 



SDA-Northwestern Survey Results 



Ancient physician and 
philosopher, Hippocrates is 
credited with the adage "Let 
food be thy medicine". Were 
this advice applied to the 
students of NSU, are would 
have to concede that few get 
their prescribed daily dosages 
of fruits and vegetables, milk 
and dairy products. 

Last fall the Student 
Dietetic Association con- 
ducted a Food Habits Survey 
among students on and off the 
NSU campus. Preliminary 
results show that when 
compared to a model diet 
suggested by the Food and 
Nutrition Board of the 
National Academy of 
Sciences, the average diet of 
NSU students is full of holes. 

The model used for com- 
parison was the Basic Four 
Food Group model. The Food 
and Nutrition Board 
recommends that the average, 
healthy American adult get 
two servings daily from the 
meat group (which includes 
eggs, peanut butter, and dried 
beans as well as meat), two 
servings from the milk and 
dairy group, four from fruits 
and vegetables and four from 
breads and cereals. 

The men on campus appear 
to be meat and bread lovers. 
Over one-half of the men 
consumed the suggested two 
servings from the meat group 
and almost half got the four 
servings of bread and cereal 
products. Only one third of 



the men ate four or more 
servings of bread and cereal 
products. Only one third of 
the men ate four or more 
servings of fruits and 
vegetables and less than one- 
fourth included enough milk 
and dairy products in their 
diets. 

The women on campus 
compared more favorably 
across the board. Almost 
seventy-five percent of the 
female students surveyed 
reported a meat intake of four 
or more servings. Close to 
one-half recorded two or more 
servings of bread and cereal 
products. One-third of the 
women included in their diet 
enough food items from the 
milk and dairy group and one- 
fourth got enough from the 
fruit and vegetables group. 

In addition to information 
about intake from the Basic 
Four, the survey explored 
student use of products from a 
fifth group: sugars, fats and 
alchohols. Selection of food 
items from this group soared 
among males and females as a 
result of a heavy consumption 
of chips, soft drinks, candy 
bars and fried foods. 

Jadging from these results, 
our diets are not nutritionally 
adequate. Because of the high 
percentage of selections from 
the Sugars, Fats and 
Alchohols group, we can 
expect that caloric intake is 
probably above average. But 
low intakes of fruits and 



vegetables, milk and dairy 
foods will result in less than 
adequate vitamin and mineral 
consumption, especially 
Vitamins A and C and the 
mineral, calcium. 

So how do you go about 
correcting the situation? Take 
vitamin and mineral sup- 
plements? No! Simply be 
more judicious in your food 
choices using the Basic four as 
your guide. Replace sugary 
snacks with raw fruits and 
vegetables. Substitute milk 
for some of those soft drinks 
and don't allow potatoe chips 
to crowd out the more 
wholesome foods. Reduce the 
amount of sugar in your 
coffee and on your cereal and 
go for broiled meats instead of 
fried. Armed with these 
suggestions you can improve 
your vitamin and mineral 
intake and, at the same time, 
cut calories for spring. 




The "Swingers", shown here, were the winners in the 
recent Air Band contest sponsored by the SUGB. 
Members of the group are Rhonda and Saundra 
Lamb, Wilford "Skippy" Waters, Deana Grau and 
Greg Shoalmire. (Photo by Allen Ford) 

Remember To Vote! ! 



Christine Ford Contributes 
To Louisiana English Journal 



"The TV Monster and ihc 
Man Next Door," wriilen by 
Dr. Christine Pickering Ford, 
appears in the recent issue of 
Ihc Louisiana English Journal. 

Dr. Ford's article explains 
how teachers can effectively 
use television and the com- 
munity to generate content or 
subject matter for writing the 
freshman composition paper. 

Dr. Ford first presented her 
ideas on this subject in a 
paper, "generating Content 
for the Freshman composition 
Paper," at the 1982 annual 
conference of the Louisiana 
Association for Post- 
Secondary Language Arts. At 
this time, an editor of LEJ 
asked her to expand it and to 
submit it for publication. 

The Louisiana English 
Journal is published in the 
Winter and Fall by the 
Louisiana Council of Teachers 
of English under the 
editorship of John Cooke and 
Elizabeth Pcnfield of the 



New Orleans, 
paper offers 
practical 
or teachers of 



University o 
Dr. Ford's 
pragmatic 
suggestions 
writing. 

An Assistant Professor of 
English at Northwestern State 
University, Dr. Ford has read 
academic papers at other 
conferences and has served as 
Secretary and Chairman of the 
Modern Drama section of the 
South Central Modern 
Language Association. Her 
present paper is based upon 
techniques she has herself used 
in her classes of composition 
at N.S.U. 

Currently at work on an 
article tentatively entitled "A 
Formulaic Approach to 
Teaching Composition," Dr. 
Ford is also involved in an 
effort to add "Wind-surfing" 
to the N.S.U. curriculum as 
pan of the Sports for Lie 
program. She combines an 
active interest in athletics with 
active academic pursuits. 



USIN9 ONLY 
THE BEST 
MEATS 




HICKORY HUT 

BAR B Q 
RESTAURANT 



342a Hwy, 1 South 
Natchitoches, LA 71457 
TELEPHONE 318/352-3720 

We Are A Member of the NSU Booster Club 



CA TEW NO 
SERVICE 
AVAILABLE 

(Contact Damian Brumley, 
Manager) 



PLATES 



COMBINATION 

BEEF 

RIBS 

PORK 

SAUSAGE 

HAM 

CHICKEN 



regular 

$4 95 
S3 75 
S3.49 
S3. 49 
S3 49 
$3.49 
S3 49 



large 

S5.95 
$4.75 
$4.75 
$4 75 
$4 75 
$4.75 
$4.75 



BEEF 

SAUSAGE 
PORK... 
HAM .... 



SANDWICHES 

regular 

$2.25 

$1.85 

$185 

$1.85 



po-boy 
$2.95 
$2.75 
$2.75 
$2.75 



SIDE ORDERS 



(includes 2 side orders) 



Individual Serving $ .75 

Pints .'. $1.50 



Cole Slaw. Potato Salad. Baked Beans. Dirty Rice. Med Okra & Squash 



FAMILY MAC PAKS - For Family of Four 

2 Pounds of Beef $17.40 2 Pounds of Ham or Pork $14.40 

2 Pounds (app ) Rib Rack $13.49 1 Large Chicken $ 6 79 

"Mac Paks" include: 1 pint each of Potato Salad. Baked Beans, Cole Slaw, and rolls with McAdam's fabulous 
bar-b-que sauce 

BY THE POUND (Chicken by the bird, app. 3 lbs.) 

BEEF : . $7.50 SAUSAGE ... $4.50 

RIBS $4 95 HAM $5.95 

PORK $5 95 CHICKEN $4.25 

Drive thru Window Special 
Sloppy Mac, Tater Tots & 
Soft Drink *1 .99 

Your favorite beverage on tap! 

All orders come without sauce, we supply it, you apply it! 

We do custom cooking of Hams and Turkeys' 

Call Ahead for really prompt service on take-out orders! 

All NSU Students Get 10% Discount with NSU ID. 



The Current Sauce, March 22, 1983, Page 3 



Second Lieutenant of Artillery 
with a B.M.E. in Education. 

After an initial assignment 
as an ADA Platoon Leader at 
Fort Lewis, Washington, and 
Fort Richardson, Alaska, he 
commanded batteries in the 
1st Battalion, 80th Field 
Artillery at Fort Sill, 
Oklahoma, and 4th Missile 
Battalion, 61st ADA at Robins 
Air Force Base, Georgia. 

He later moved on as a G-3 
Plans Officer in Seoul, Korea 
and as Instructor at the US 
Army Infantry School. 
Hoglan later became 
Executive Officer of the 8th 
Battalion, 4th Field Artillery 



in Vietnam. 

General Hoglan also served 
with Office of the Assistant 
Chief of Staff, Intelligence, 
Headquarters, Department of 
the Army, and with the Office 
of the Chief, Legislative 
Laison at Headquarters, 
Department of the Army. 

Later he moved on to Plans 
Officer with Headquarters, 
Pacific Command, and as a 
Battle Staff Commander, 
CINCPAC Airborne Com- 
mand Post in Hawaii. From 
1972-74, he commanded the 
2nd Battalion, 10th Field 
Artillery Group in Wertheim, 
Germanv. He later served in 



Frankfurt, West Germany as 
commanding General of V 
Corps. 



General Hoglan and his wife 
Katherine have two children. 



PARKING TICKETS 

1. The first and second parking ticket of a registered vehicle is 
$1.00 each if paid within 96 hours but, if correspondence is 
necessary a $5.00 administrative fee is added. 

2. Please park your vehicle on the tennis court and coliseum 
parking lots when attending activites on the lakefront area. 
Considerable time and money is devoted to make and keep the 
campus beautiful. Parking on grass areas takes away from this 
effort. Please cooperate and park on hard surfaces only. 



Sophisticated Gents — 



General Hoglan To Speak As Part of Distinguished Lecture Series 

Brigadier General Curtis F. 
Hoglan, a 1955 Northwestern 
graduate, will be the featured 
speaker as part ' of the 
Distinguished Lecture Series 
on April 8. The lecture will 
. begin at 10:00 a.m. in Keyser 
Hall Auditorium, and all 
10:00 classes will be dismissed. 

General Hoglan was born in 
Austin, Texas, but attended 
school in Louisiana. He 
graduated from Nor- 
thwestern's ROTC program 
and he was commissioned a 

Sarrington 
onors 

The Northwestern Bac- 
calaureate Program at the 
Warrington Campus in 
Shreveport brought back 
seven individual and school 
awards at the 1983 Convention 
of the Louisiana Association 
of Student Nurses, held in 
Baton Rouge recently. 

Mary E. Zapczynski topped 
the lit of NSU winners when 
she was selected as "Student 
Nurse of the State." 

Elected as Statewide 
Consultant was Mical E. 
DeBrow, and elected as LASN 
Horizons Editor was Ruth 
Ann Welch. 

Also receiving honors were 
Renee Hankins who was 
selected Nominations 
Committee Chairperson and 
Teresa Ogletree who was 
appointed Hypertension 
Awareness Chairperson. 

DeBrow was also endorsed 
for National Office. 

The NSU-Warrington 
chapter of the Student Nurses 
Association also received the 
averall first place for sub- 
missions to the Louisiana 
Association of Student 
Nurses, Horizons. 




MAGGIOS 

Wishes All NSU 
Students A Safe 
and Happy Easter 



230 Hwy. 1 South 
352-3033 



725 Amulet St. 
352-3950 



Winning contestants in Delta Sigma Theta's second 
annual Sophisticated Gents Pageant are from left to 
right Maurice Johnson, Craig Ryan, Curtis James, 
Eddie Norris. and Harlan Harvey - overall winner. 

Potpourri Needs Staff 



The Potpourri is still taking 
applications for positions on 
the 1983 Fall staff. If anvone 



would like to apply, see Janice 
Williams in the Potpourri 
office. 



Menu Lists for Iberville 
Mar. 22-25 

Lunch 

Tues: Cheeseburger, 
Tuna Noodle Casserole. 

Wed: Grilled Ham & 
Chees, Chili Frito Pie 

Thurs: Hot Dogs, 
Chicken Pot Pie 

FN: Seafood Gumbo, 
Chili Macaroni 

Dinner 

Tues: PASTA EX- 
TRAVAGANZA 

Wed: Chicken and 
Dumplings, Baked Meat 
Loaf. 

Thurs: STEAK NIGHT, 
Fried Shrimp, V* lb. 
Hamburgers 

Breaded Ham Patties, 
Stuffed Green Peppers 



Spring Splash 

Saturday 
April 9, 1983 

Place: NSU Recreation Complex 



Events: 

Golf Scramble General Public, NSU Students 
s 10 00 per person, Tee Time 12:30. Deadline 
for entry April 8. Prizes will be awarded. 

Pool Games (for NSU Students Only), 2:00- 
4:30. Register at pool that day. Prizes will be 
awarded. 

Crawfish Boil 5-7, NSU Students s 4 00 General 
Public s 5 00 . Deadline for tickets Wednesday, 
April 6. Tickets avaialble in Student Union Rm 
214. 




BODY BY 
BODY WORLD 




SHEILA COLE 

GET IN SHAPE FOR 
SUMMER 

Only '21 a Month 

BODY WORLD 
HEALTH SPA 

234 Keyser 357-9560 



Opinion 

Current Sauce 
Page 4 1 

The Opinions expressed on (his page are strictly those of the author. 1 hey 
do not neccessarily express the view of this paper, the student body of- 
NSU, or the administration. The Current Sauce accepts all articles and 
letters. All correspondence must be signed and a phone number must 
accompany it. Guest editorials are accepted but they too must be signed. 
The Current Sauce reserves the right to edit any articles that come into 
our office, deleting anything that may be considered libelous. All articles 
must be turned in no later than the Thursday preceding publication. 



NTE Survivor ThinksTest Is Inconclusive 



The Final Vote 



Tltc primary elections are over, and now, at least for the top 
two SCiA offices, (he real race is on. Tomorrow, everything 
comes 10 a head when you, the siudents of Northwestern, pick 
who you want to represent you as your SGA President and Vice- 
President for Ihe 1983-84 year. 

Ii was encouraging io sec lhal over 700 voters took part in this 
pasi week's election. It would be nicer still to climb above the 
one thousand voTcf mark. 

This election is important. It's lime lo select (he person who 
will siep in and fill Ihe void created by the graduation of iwo- 
Icrm SCiA president Joseph Stanley. Stanley left some awful big 
shoes lo fill, and whoever is elected will have to work mighty 
hard lo be as effective for NSU as he was. 

It's probably a moot point to make lhal whoever is elected 
president will have lo be the kind of person who can respond lo 
ihe students of NSU and do whai is in their besi interest. The 
new presideni is very foriunale thai he or she will be su rounded 
by some good hard working senators. 

Bui something else ihai's also important that's also ofien 
limes overlooked, is lhal ihe vice-president plays an imporlani 
role in the SCiA also. 

This year, we have two capable candidates in the run-off who 
will be ready and able lo pick up where Stacy Soilcau left off. 

Again, ii's up to you to decide who's going lo be representing 
you. If any of you are looking for the SAUCE lo support or 
endorse one or (ho other of ihe candidalcs-forgei il. We think 
Hun all four of ihe candidates can do ihc job lhal they are 
running for capably. 

On a related note, ii was heariening lo sec so many people 
mnning for office as opposed lo last year. I.asi year as you will 
recall, more. than hall of Hie SCiA executive offices were 
unopposed. T his year, only one was unopposed. It's good lo sec 
ihai more and more people are taking an avid interest in what's 
'ioingon ai Northwestern. --Joe Cunningham 



Lampoon 



The Current Sauce Lam- 
poon Edition will be Tuesday 
April 12, which is the first 
available publishing date after 
NSU opens back up after the 
Kaster holidays. The Current 
Sa uce will be printing a regular- 



paper that week also, with the 
lampoon merely being an 
inserted portion of the regular 
paper. The Current Sauce is 
still accepting lampoon stories 
from any NSU student, 
teacher, or staff member. 



Current Sauce 

(USPS 140-660) 



Editor 
Joe Cunningham Jr. 
News Editor 
Lisa Williams 

Sports Editor 
John Cunningham 



Advertising Manager Business Manager 
Charlene Elvers David Saylors 



Co-Focus Editor 
Pat Skidmore 

Asst. News Editor 
Diana' Grafton 



Co-Focus Editor 
Beatrice Dawson 

Circulation Manager 
Dean Napoli 



Photographer 
Melanie Daigle 

Current Suet is ihc official publication of 
the student body of Northwestern State . 
University « Natchitoches. Louisiana. The* 
newspaper is entered as second class matter at 
the Natchitoches Post Officer under the act of 
March). I m. 

Current Sauce is published every Tuesday 
morning io the fall and sprint semester wiih 
the exception of holidays and testing periods, 
and bi-weekly during the summer session. It is 
printed at the Natchitoches Times, Highway I 
South. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 

Editorial and business offices of the Sauce 
are located in room 224. Arts and Sciences 
Building. Telephone number is 357 5456. 

Current Sauce subscriptions are (4 yearly, 
and extend from the first summer issue 
ihrough-the final issue of the Spring semester. 
Checks should be made payable to Current 



Advisor 
Frank Presson 

Sauce, and should be mailed to Current Sauce. « 
NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 

Opinions expressed in editorial columns are 
solely those of the writer and do not 
necessarily represent the viewpoint of the 
administration, faculty, staff, or student body 
of Northwestern. 

Letters io the editor are invited, and con- 
tributions are solicited from students, faculty, 
staff, or student body of Northwestern. 
Letters must be signed and be no more than 
500 words to be considered for publication 
They may be on any subject or public figure 
and must not be in any way slanderous or 
libelous. 

Current Sauce reserves the right to edit the 
letter for journalistic style and available space. 

Send postal form number 3379 to Current 
Sauce. NSU. Natchitoches. Louisiana. 71457. 



By Kathleen Smith 

Being a survivor of the 
National Ts'acher's Exam, I 
naturally, as do most sur- 
vivors, have some definite 
opinions as to the nature and 
validity of this peculiar 
fashion of determining who is 
and who is not qualified to 
teach in the state of Louisiana. 
I am well aware of the con- 
troversy that has been raging 
over the NTE for the past 
three years. And I must admit 
that I wholeheartedly agree ' 
with those who insist that 
teachers should be able to 
read, write, and do simple 
mathematical calculations (in 
real life there is no algebra). 
The NTE measures all of these 
basic skills quite acurately, but 
after this fact, the test falls 
short of any true method of 
determining what makes a 
successful teacher. 

There is no way that the 
NTE can sort out who will be 
the creative, inovative or 
highly motivated 
teacher... much less who will 
be able to pass these qualities 
on to the students. What the 
NTE does measure is who will 
be able to write grammatically 
correct notes to parents, read 
and possibly understand 
memos from the school board, 
average grades, and calculate 
the percentage of profits that 
the FFA will make from their 
gumbo supper. 

It does not predict which 
person will be able to manage 
a classroom of twenty- five 
first graders or an unwieldy 
group of ninth graders who 
would much rather study each 

Letter To The Editor 

Dear Joe 

I have just finished reading 
the article in your last weeks 
(March 15) edition concerning 
the changes in the com- 
mencement exercises. 

As someone who has 
previously graduated from 
NSU, I know that holding the 
commencement exercises in 
Prather Coliseum can be a big 
hassle. Anyone who has ever 
been to graduation at Nor- 
thwestern knows the trouble 
of trying to get from one side 
of the coliseum to the other. 
Trying to go in the opposite 
direction as the crowd flow is 
not for the faint-hearted. I 
have nothing against trying to 
improve graduation, but some 
of the things I read, are to put 
it mildly, STUPID. 

(1) . Having graduation in 
Turpin Stadium: I know it's 
bigger and there will be more 
room, but where are the 
parents and family of the 
graduates supposed to sit, aisle 
J with a pair of binoculars? 

(2) . Having only one 
graduation a year: This might 
be a mute point since it was 
voted down, but since it was 
propose and might possibly 



other than civics. Supposedly, 
education majors have learned 
how to deal with these 
situations through their course 
work and their exposure to 
students during their practice 
teaching, but there is nothing 
like facing thirty pairs of eyes 
armed only with the teacher's 
manual to truly test a teacher. 

A good teacher must be 
constantly creative. This does 
not mean that he/she has the 
best looking bulletin boards. 
A creative teacher will 
cultivate the friendship of the 
art teacher. Rather, creativity 
in a teacher means that he/she 
will be able to present the 
material to be learned in an 
interesting, stimulating, and 
(dare I even suggest?) en- 
tertaining manner. Creativity 
means figuring out ways to 
make your supply of ditto 
paper last the entire school 
year or how to teach science 
using only laboratory 
equipment that you have 
brought from your kitchen 
because the lab next door has 
been used as a supply room for 
the past ten years. The NTE 
cannot possibly tell who will 
be able to do this. 

What the NTE tells the 
prospective teacher is how 
woefully inadequate his/her 
college education has been. It 
comes as a rude shock to 
realize that the college 
graudate is actually expected 
to knev something about 
literature, fine arts, and the 
social sciences... even though 
he/she is a biology, P.E. or 
elementary education major. 
The unsuspecting student sits 



come up again in the future, I 
have a few things to say about 
it. In reading the article, it 
said that fall graduates can 
receive their diplomas at the 
end of that semester, and then 
come back for graduation if 
they wish. I ask you, how 
many people who complete 
their college careers in 
December, then become 
employed, are going to take 
the time to come back, put on 
a silly black choir robe, to sit 
and listen to a bunch of people 
talk, not many I know of I 
assure you. It's like running 
the race after you've already 
got the prize, the thrill is gone. 

(3) . Having to pay cap and 
gown fees even if you don't 
participate in commencement 
exercises: Hey, I know 
Northwestern needs all the 
money it can get, but this is 
ridiculous. 

(4) . Lastly, I quote from the 
article, "names of the 
graduates will not be called in 
order to decrease audience 
uproar." and "spring can- 
didates will graduate as usual. 
The diploma cover will be 
presented as a person walks 
across the stage...". 



down in his chair, armed with 
all of the educational 
philosophies know since the 
beginning of time, and is 
suddenly asked questions 
about Beethoven, the structure, 
of DNA and the causes of the 
War of 1812. It can be a very 
humbling experience. 

Unlike many, I do not feel 
that the NTE should be done 
away with. The poor test 
results have shown the 
weaknesses of the educational 
systems, and hopefully 
colleges will make steps to 
correct them. Students who 
have applied themselves in 
school and find that they are 
unable to pass the NTE should 
take a second look at what 
they have been taught and 
seriously question the quality 
of their education. 

Finally, if you are among 
the fortunate few who have 
managed to pass the NTE, it 
does not necessarily mean that 
you have had a good 
education or that you will be a 
successful teacher. You may 
merely be a good test-taker or 
lucky or both. A good teacher 
is one because he/she wants to 
be, not because it is the only 
thing that he/she can do. 

Kathleen Smith is currently 
a graduate assistant in the 
Theatre/Speech Department. 
She has an M.A. in Woman's 
History from the University of 
Maryland, has taught in 
Natchitoches Parish and 
scored in the 99°7o on the NTE. 

Prior to this she had never 
taken an education course. 
Kathleen Smith 

Graduation is for the 
students who have spent the 
last 4 or 5 years working 
toward it. It is also for their 
families who have probably 
paid for most of it. The 
students and their families 
deserve to hear their name 
called out, they deserve that 
special recognition. Besides, if 
they are going to walk across 
the stage anyway, why not call 
their names, it doesn't take up 
that much extra time. If 
someone wants to yell at them, 
let them they'll do it anyway. 
Sure it's undignified, but it 
doesn't hurt anything and the 
student sure as hell earned it. 

I sincerely hope the 
Graduation Council and the 
Faculty Senate will reconsider 
some of their proposals, 
especially the last one. The 
people graduating this spring 
deserve to have their names 
called, they deserve the in - 
dividual recognition. 

Sincerely. 
David L. Ulmer 

Dear Editor, 

Must you always have the 
last word? Your note under 
Mr. McKellar's letter was a 



Organizations 



SAM 

On March 9, 1983, the 
Society for the Advancement 
of Management held its 
monthly meeting and it 
marked the beginning of 
another busy spring semester. 

Today, from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. in the Student Union 
Lobby, for all juniors, seniors, 
and graduate students, SAM 
has the following credit card 
tables set up: SEARS, J.L. 
WILSON-WASHER BROS., 
MONTGOMERY WARD, 
SANGER HARRIS, ZALES, 
and JOSKE'S, for those 
students desiring to obtain 
personal credit. 

Tomorrow, from 1 p.m. to 
4 p.m in room 108 of the 
Business Administration 
Building, SAM will be 
sponsoring its second annual 
STUDENT INCOME TAX 
SEMINAR. The seminar will 
be conducted by guest in- 
structors. As the federal 
forms, 1040 A and 1040EZ, 
will be provided, the in- 
structors have asked that those 
who plan to attend, bring with 
the necessary form(s) . needed, 
such as the W-2 form. 

Letter To The Editor 

Dear Joe; 

On behalf of the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity and the 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Association, I would like to 
lhank the students of Nor- 
thwestern who came out and 
supported the MDA by at- 
tending the Kappa Alpha 
sponsored boxing tournament 
and of course, all of the 
fighters who gave their all in 
the matches. We were very 
fortunate to raise alot of 
money for the charity. 

We would also like to thank 
Mr. Jim Johnson at the news 
bureau for all of his help and 
•he Current Sauce for all of 
•heir publicity. 

We hope that next year the 
tournament will be even bigger 
an d that we can raise more 
money for the MDA. 
Sincerely, 
J ames LaCaze 

Letter To The Editor 

cheap shot. Why don't you 
leave the mud slinging to the 
third- graders and focus on 
'^proving the quality of the 
sauce! 

Susan C. Fortenbery 
fcd -'s Note-O.K. 



Kappa Alpha 

Our M.D. Boxing tour- 
nament came out to be a big 
success this year. Thanks to 
all N.S.U. students and 
everyone who helped make it 
possible. 

The Brothers of Kappa 
Alpha would like to thank 
Sigma Kappa for coming to 
our "Freakers' Ball" ex- 
change. We all had a great 
time. 

We would like to 
congratulate Harlan Harvey's 
selection for Tri Sig's Man of 
the Year award. We should 
like to also mention that those 
K.A.'s who attended the Tri 
Sig formal all had a great time. 

Our Hell's Angels" bash 
was at its' best this year. We 
would like to thank our fellow 
brother, Mr. James LaCaze 
for the use of his warehouse. 

Congrautlations to our 
newly elected officers. Britton 
Eaves is our new 
Parliamentarian and Chuck 
Shaw takes on the role of 
Sergeant at Arms. 

Our basketball team did one 
heck of a job this year. 
Overall we had five wins to 
three losses but managed to 
battle our way to the finals. 
Better luck next year! 

The Brothers of Kappa 
Alpha would like to wish all 
N.S.U. students and staff a 
safe and happy Easter. 



SGA Amendment 

Student Government Association Bill 1 1 
Sponsor Dean Napoh 
Date March 14, 1983 

WHEREAS, the N.S.U. Student Govern- 
ment Association recognizes graduations 
ceremonies to be of great importance to the 
N.S.U. student body , and 

WHEREAS, the S.G.A. recognizes the neet 
to improve the current standards of our 
graduation ceremonies, but these im- 
provements should be implemented without 
compromising those traditions of individual 
recognition and attention which N.S.U. prides 
itself on. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the 
N.S.A. respectfully request that N.S.U. 
maintain the status quo of our graduation 
ceremonies regarding the summer, fall, and 
spring graduation ceremonies. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the 
S.G.A. requests that the status quo be 
maintained regarding the calling at graduation 
of the names of the candidates. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the 
universiy sponsor a reception to be held 
following the ceremony for graduates, their 
families, and auests. 



SGA Amendment 

Student Government Association Bill 10 
Sponsor Shawn Wyble 
Date March 14. 198J 

WHEREAS, most buildings on campus, 
especially dormitories and classrooms, are 
without emergency, auxiliary lighting and 
smoke alarms, and 

WHEREAS, the students' and faculty's 
safety should not be compromised. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the 
university install emergency, auxiliary lighting 
and smoke alarms in all dormitories and 
buildings where night classes or activities arc 
held. 



WHFOC SGA Amendment 

»n,rVb,,i^ AS ' NSU Rodeo Team has 
recoil much iocal and "»"°nal 
W 8 u"' " 10 Northwestern, and 

manvh„ S ' ' he NSU Rodc ° Tram nas w °" 

NonC™" .'and 

"«l^d ER ~ A ^ thc NSU Rode ° Tm™ I™ 

'"'olfmentof'^"'"!: by enlare,ng ,hc 
own swr he s ' udtnl bod y lh '°"8h their 
'eputai L eneral(!d funds and lhrou B h fine 
^o^ th Wh1C t: ,he NS U R ° d « Team 

^FBE.?" 11 *" 11 ,he country, and 
•"nefii rh ■ lhe NSU Rodco Tcam 
♦-^rouah ,h univws »y and the student body. 



on campus which hold many student activities 
including the NSU Student Rodeo, and 

WHEREAS. The NSU Rodeo Team, which 
currently survives strictly on private 
donations, would be able to continue its fine 
performance and grow in the future through 
financial support of the NSU Student Body. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the 
Student Government Association respectfully 
request that the Northwestern State University 
Rodeo Team receive a $1 00 student self- 
assessed fee from all full time students at- 
tending the Natchitoches campus for a period 
of four years effective the summer session of 
1983. 



Phi Mu 

Phi Mu's are busy making 
last minute plans for our 
upcoming formal. And, 
speaking of formals, at the 
Kappa Formal five Phi Mu 
ladies were named Stardusters. 
They were: Angela Lasyone, 
Melanie Campbell, Deana 
Grau, Connie Leger, and 
Saundra Lamb. We're real 
proud of these girls! 

We'd like to thank the men 
of Kappa Sigma for having an 
exchange with us March 9. 
Everyone who went had a nice 
time. 

We're proud of our Phi 
Class, also. Terri Ellis, the 
Phi Director, is busily teaching 
them the who, what and where 
of Phi Mu. We know these 
Phis will be great future ac- 
tives. 

Delta Sigma Theta 

The Iota Mu Chapter of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority 
held its second formal meeting 
of the semester on Sunday, 
February 20, 1983. Programs 
for the semester and pledge 
period activities were among 
the topics discussed. 

On February 22, 1983, the 

sorority held its second annual 

Sophisticated Gents Pageant. 

The proceeds from this 

pageant were donated to the 

sororities little sisters, the girls 

at the Cane River Children's 

Home. . 
As a climax to their 

Founders Week which oc- 
curred February 21-27, the 
Sorors held their Church 
Program on Sunday, 
February, 27. The speaker for 
the program was Soror Gloria 
Banks who is Delta Sigma 
Theta sororites Southwest 
Regional Director. Soror 
Banks spoke from the 
Founder's Day theme: "Black 
Women: Dealing More Ef- 
fectively with Racism is 
Diverse College com- 
munities." Soror Banks was 
also the speaker at the banquet 
that followed the Church 
Program. 

The annual Jabborwock 
was held March 5, 1983. The 
Grambling State University 
Theatre presented their award 
winning play, "The Night of 
Baker's End." The proceeds 
from this function will be used 
to provide a scholarship to a 
worthy student. 

Iota Mu is also proud to 
announce its Pyramid Pledge 
Group for the Spring of 83. 
They are Cassandra Cade, 
Brenda Fowler, Shirley White, 
Amanda Young, Brunetta 
Anthony, and Heidi Myles. 
These young ladies par- 
ticipated with their big sisters 
in the Clean-Up Natchitoches 
campaign. 



The Current Sauce, March 22, 1983, Page 5 



Delta Sigma Theta 



The Pyramids of the Iota 
Mu Chapter of Delta Sigma 
Theta had their first meeting, 
Friday, March 11, 1983. One 
topic discussed at the meeting 
was the cleaning up of Nat- 
chitoches. Those helping 
clean up were Pyramids 
Brenda Fowler, Shirley White, 
Amanda Young, Brunetta 
Anthony, Hudeith Myles, and 
Big Sisters Birdia Palmer, 
Darlene Brown, De'Etra 
Scott, and Vicki Williams. 
Those that were unavailable 
because of other obligations 
are Big Sisters Rosetta Boone, 



Vera LaCour, Debra 
Thompson, Jackie Larry 
Daisy Jenkins, and Pyramid 
Cassandra Cade. 

One of our Pyramids, 
Brunetta Anthony, won 
Senator at Large in last 
Wednesday's election. We 
feel that Brunetta will be a 
great asset to the SGA and the 
student body. 

The Pyramids would also 
like to thank those who came 
out to help support them with 
their dance that was held last 
Wednesday. 




SPRING BREAK 83 

catch the fever at 

IHHe Chicago 

as we present hot specials all week long designed 
to get you ready for the Spring Break vacation. 

beginning 

Tuesday 

No Cover Charge 
Pitchers of cold Budweiser Beer for just '3.00 



The Famous Beer Bust is back on Wednesday nights 



Thursday 

throw the biggest party around 
featuring 

50" Budweiser & Bud Light longnecks 



all this plus the hot new sounds of 

Ronnie Brumley & Fire 

playing the best in dance music nitely 

IHrie Chicago 

Proper Attire 
& I D. Required 

620 Hwy. 1 South 352 4793 Natchitoches, La. 



i 



Demons 



Lady Demons 



Golf ^ 

vSports 

«Y)»^ Current Sauce S ^* 



Current Sauce 

Page 6 
March 22, 1983 



McNeese Sweeps Demons 
In Baseball Twinbill 



Northwestern's baseball 
team dropped its eighth 
straight game Thursday, 
losing to McNeese in the final 
inning by a 3-2 score. 

The game was scoreless up 
until the sixth inning when 
McNeese's David Perez claim 
jumped a fast ball to give the 
Cowboys a 1-0 lead going into 
the final inning. 

The Demons got Scott 
Huscroft on base and then 
advanced the third baseman 
when Rufino Suarez got a 
single. Wayne Lup followed 
Suarez's hit with another 
single which scored Huscroft. 
Centerfielder Gil Herndon was 



then hit by a pitch to load the 
bases, but David Grappe was 
put out on a fielder's choice to 
keep the bases loaded with two 
outs. Jerry NorvelL. was 
walked, forcing in a run to 
give NSUa2-l lead. 

After the Demons got their 
third out, two walks and 
another man safe on a fielder's 
choice loaded the bases with 
Perez coming to bat. Perez 
delivered a two-RBI shot to 
end the contest. 

With the loss, the Demons 
now stand at 12-17 on the 
season and are scheduled to 
play Louisiana Tech at 2 p.m. 
Sunday. 



Demons Snap Streak, 
Split With Centenary 

Northwestern snapped a 
nine-game losing streak 
Saturday as the defeated 
Centenary 8-2 in the second 
game of a doubleheader. 
Centenary won the ODener 6-5. 

In the first game, Nor- 
thwestern took a 4-1 lead after 
two innings. Two of the runs 
' came on Gents' errors and 
catcher David Grapped singled 
in two runs. 

But Centenary scored four 
in the fifth and won the game 
in the sixth on Wayne 
Rathbun's homer. 

In the second game, the 
Demons scored three runs in 
the third on a homer by David 
Grappe and a triple by Steve 
Graf, and singles by Graf, 
Reynolds, and David Bailey 
accounted for the runs in the 
sixth and seventh 

Joe Jackson was the win- 
ning pitcher for Northwestern. 
Jackson, now 4-0 this season, 
allowed, five hits and fanned 
four. 

Northwestern is now 13-18 
for the season. 



Northwestern Tennis Teams Win Matches Over UNO 



Northwestern men's and 
women's tennis teams both 
won matches Saturday, taking 
decisions over the University 
of New Orleans, the men 
winning by a 9-0 score and the 



Lady Demons getting a 7-2 
decision. 

The Demon men's squad 
now stands at 7-1 on the 
season and the Lady Demons 
are 8-7. The scheduled 




Begona Fabergas, the Lady Demons number 2 seeded 
player, smashes a return in a Lady Demon dual match 
earlier this month. Fabergas and the rest of the Lady 
Demons sport an 8-7 worksheet on the young year. 



matches at Tulane for Sunday 
were rained out. Both the men 
and women will play at 
McNeese State on Wednesday 
before the Spring break. 

In men's action on Saturday 
Jorge Salkeld won at No. 1 
singles by a 6-1,6-1 margin 
over Neil Tourdo. Donny 
Lovo followed with a 6-1,6-1 
win and at No. 3 Morris 
Brown scored a 6-4,6-1 win. 
Jorge Salvo won his No. 4 
singles 6-0,6-1 and Lytt Allen 
was a 6-0,6-0 winner at No. 5. 
Hugo Molina picked up a 
forfeit win at No. 6 singles. 

Salkeld and Allen teamed 
for a 7-6,6-4 win at No. 1 
doubles and Salvo and 
Francisco Acuna won No. 2 
doubles 6-0,6-1. Molina and 
Lovo won by forfeit at No. 3 
doubles. 

In women's action the Lady 
Demons won four singles 
matches and swept all three 
doubles. Liliana Isaza won at 
No. 1 singles 6-2,6-2 and at 
No. 2 Begona Fabregas had to 
go three sets for a 6-1,4-6,6-4 
win. Pam Aud won at No. 4 6- 
0,6-1 and Kim Tollett won No. 
6 singles by a 6-1 ,6-2 score. 

In doubles Isaza and Mara 
Salano defeated New Orleans' 
No. 1 team 6-4,3-6,7-5 and 
Aud teamed with Karla Tubbs 
for a 6-4,6-2 win at No. 2. 
Tollett and Carmen Sirera 
won the final match of the day 
by a 6-2,6-2 margin. 



Read The SAUCE 




Joe Jackson, one of NSU's brightest newcomers, fires 
away on another pitch for the Demons. Jackson and 
the rest of the Demons host Grambling today in a 
baseball doubleheader at Stroud-Brown field. 



Lady Demons Crush 
Lamar Twice, 9-1, 6-3 



Janet Guerrini and Julie 
Robinson both collected five 
hits as Northwestern's Lady 
Demon softball team defeated 
Lamar 9-1 and 6-3 here 
Wednesday. The Lady 
Demons are now 8-3 on the 
season and Lamar falls to 0-9. 

In the first contest Robinson 
collected three hits and drove 
in four runs, one of those hits 
a two-run homer. Guerrini 
also had three hits in the 
opener, including a three-run 
homer in the bottom of the 
sixth. 

In the second contest 
Guerrini blasted two solo 
home runs while Robinson 
had two singles. Sherri 
Broocks drove in two runs 
with a pair of hits and Carla 
Peters also had two RBI's for 
the Lady Demons. 

Sydney Forrester pitched 
both wins for Northwestern, 
raising her record to 7-2 on the 
season. In the first game she 
allowed just three hits and 
although Lamar had 10 hits in 
the second contest it left nine 
runners stranded on base 
before getting two runs in the 
seventh inning. 

Here are the line scores: 
FIRST GAME: 
Lamar 000 001 0--1 3 2 
Northwestern 013 023 x--9 10 1 
Ballard and Huff. Svdnev 



Forrester and Jackie 

Calandro. W-Forrester (6-2); 

L-Ballard. 

SECOND GAME 

Lamar 010 000 2-3 10 2 

Northwestern 121 002 x-6 10 

1 

Green, Bower (6) and Clark; 
Sydney Forrester and Jackie 
Calandro. W- Forrester (7-2); 
L-Green. 

RECORDS: Northwestern 
State is 8-3; Lamar is 0-9. 



S.U. Cafeteria 
March 14-25 

Mon: Red Beans & Rice, 
Turkey & Dressing, 
Meat Pie 

Tues: Chick & Dum- 
plings. Liver & Onions, 
Roast Beef. 

Wed: Beef Stew, Veal 
Parmesan, Polish 
Sausage & Kraut. 

Thurs: Bar-B-Q Chicken, 
Ham Mac & Cheese, 
Roast Pork 

Fri: Fried Fish, 
Spaghetti & Meat 
Sauce, Chicken Pot Pie 



The Current Sauce, March 22, 1983, Page 7 



Track Team Successful At Tech Mankato St. Runs Past Northwestern 



Northwestern's track and 
field team captured two first 
places Saturday at the 
Louisiana Tech Invitational, 
and along with those four . 
wins, placed second three 
times and third four times. 

"We are continuing to show 
improvement with every meet 
and that is what you look 
for," said Demon Caoch Leon 
Johnson following the meet. 
"In some areas were are 
improving more rapidly than 
in other areas, but everyone on 
the team is showing im- 
provement, not just some 
individuals and not just in 
certain areas. 

Winners for the Demons on 
Saturday included Mario 
Johnson in the 100-meter dash 
and Steve Stockton in the 
javelin. Both are juniors and 
both are NCAA All- 
Americans. Johnson won the 
100-meter dash in a time of 
10.60, his best of the outdoor 
season. Stockton threw the 
pvelin 234-8 to win the that 
event for the third straight 
meet. 

Placing second for Nor- 
thwestern were the relay teams 
in the 400,800, and 1600-meter 
events. Running the 400 event 
were Rod Hendricks, Edgar 
Washington, Percy McGlory 
and Mario Johnson in a time 
of 40.59. Those same four ran 
a 1:23.53 in the 800-meter 
relay. 

The 1600-meter relay team 
of Washington, Johnson, 
Hendricks, and Wilson Brown 
placed second in a time of 
3:11.19. All three times are 
season-bests in those events 
for the Demons. 

Senior hurdler Carlos Minor • 
collected a pair of third places 
in the hurdle events. Minor 
ran a 14.70 in the 1 10-hurdles, 
his best time this season, and 
then turned in a 54.51 clocking 
in the 400-meter hurdles. Bob 
Waddell also placed third in 

Schweitzer Wins 
Decathlon 

Northwestern's Rick 
Schweitzer, who is being 
redshirted this spring, won the 
decathlon competition at the 
Rice University Southern TAC 
decathlon meet in Houston 
over this past weekend. 

Schweitzer, who holds the 
Northwestern and Louisiana 
collegiate record in the 
decathlon, placed 11th in the 
nation at the national meet last 
year. Schweitzer plans to 
complete his college eligibility 

1984 while preparing for the 
U.S. Olympic team. 

In Houston this past 
weekend Schweitzer won two 
of the 10 events outright, tied 
lor first in three other events 
and set a meet record in the 
Javelin. Schweitzer ended the 
; competition with 7,576 points. 

Schweitzer threw the javelin 
^06-10 to set a meet record and 
w °n the overall competion 
0v cr 15 other competitors. 



the javelin with a throw of 
197-5, his best effort of the 
season. 

"I was pleased with the 
entire team effort," added 
Johnson. 

"Our field events people 
also did well," continued 
Johnson. "Kevin Johnson 
didn't place in the shot, but he 
had his college best of 55-9 l /2. 
Steve Stockton threw well and 
Bob Waddell also had his best 
college throw in the javelin, so 
it's easy to see the im- 
provement. 



Northwestern's dual track 
meet against Mankato State 
was unable to be completed 
because of rain, as just 12 
events were run. Of those 12 
events Northwestern had four 
first places and Mankato State 
had won seven events while 
Steve Grenchik of Centenary 
won the 5000-meter run. 

"With this type of weather 
and the wet track we weren't 
going to run any of our 
sprinters in either the sprints 
or relays and take a chance of 
injury," said Demon track 



Coach Leon Johnson. "Our 
distance runners and fi,eld 
event people got some good 
work for this weekend at 
Tech, but other than that the 
meet helped Mankato State 
much more than us." 

Northwestern's Steve Steve 
Stockton won the javelin with 
a throw of 235-0 and Demon 
Bob Waddell placed second. 
Kevin Johnson won the shot 



put for the Demons with an 
effort of 154-0. 

Northwestern's Rodney 
Hendricks won the 400-meter 
dash with a time of 48.84. 
Wilson Brown in second place 
and Mario Johnson in third 
made it a clean sweep for the 
Demons. Northwestern also 
claimed first in the 400-meter 
hurdles with Carlos Minor 
winning in a time of 53.9. 




Demon netter Morris Brown, the Demons number 3 

seed, uncorks on a serve in an NSU tennis match 
earlier this season. The Demon netters are 7-1 as of 
press time. 



ATTENTION 

DEMONS! 

All NSU Jackets 
are Vz off in the 
Bookstore 




"We're getting an education 
to run a filling station." 

So ran the words of an old song popul.ir during 
the Depression. No, we're not in a depression, 
but if our energy sources dry up so will our 
jobs. Industry and business depend on energy 
to survive. And to supply that energy, utility 
companies must make full use of toddy's 
technology and of every a vailable energy source 
including nuc lear power and coal. The failure to 
utilize these two sources of energy, along with 
others available, could seriously jeopardize 
the industrial and economic growth of our area. 
And growth is what we need to provide jobs. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

( rntrjl /ouim.ioj llii tni ( cim/hiny / (,ult Sfjfi^ Ulililii". ( umpjny 
(oum.inj Powft & /i K hi ( nmp.my I Nrw Or/cjm PuhlSj Servitc Int 
Sou/hwsicm Hi-dnt I'liwt-r ( i>mp.iny 




Why not think seriously about a career in 
the electric utility industry when you're 
meeting with various professional rep- 
resentatives at the end of this semester? 







The Current Sauce, March 22, 1983, Page 8 



Lady Demons Do Well In Houston Sweeps Northwestern In Baseball Doubleheader 



Central State Tourney 



Northwestern's Lady 
Demon softball team raised its 
record to 6-3 on the season by 
winning three of five games in 
Central State University 
tournament here over last 
weekend. 

The Lady Demons opened 
play with a 4-1 win over 
Central State, a team that was 
in the national tournament a 
year ago. Northwestern then 
defeated Emporia State of 
Kansas 1-0 in 11 innings 
before droppin a 4-3 contest to 
Texas Wesleyan. 

On Saturday the Lady 
Demons defeated West Texas 
State by a 4-1 score before 
being knocked out of the 
tournament by Northern Iowa 
by a 2-1 score. 

The Lady Demons were 
scheduled to host Lamar on 
Wednesday and then next 
Monday and Tuesday will host 
Eastern Michigan and Stephen 
F. Austin in twinbills at 
Highland Park. 

In the win over Central 
State the Lady Demons got 
two hits from Sherri Broocks 
and Annette Manuel knocked 
in two runs with a single in the 
first inning. Sydney Forrester 
pitched the win for NSU, 
allowing just six hits and one 
earned run. 

The Lady Demons had to go 
extra innings to get past 
Emporia State in the second 
round, finally scoring the only 
run of the game in the 11th 
inning. Cindy Wigley led off 
the inning with a single and 
was sacrificed to second by 
Julie Robinson. After a 
strikeout Broocks ended the 
game with a single to score 
pinch-runner Renee Richard. 
Forrester again went the 
distance on the mound, 
allowing just three hits in 11 
innings. 

In the loss to Texas the Lady 
Demons scored two runs in the 
bottom of the seventh and had 
the tying run on third when the 
final out was made. Annette 
Manuel drove in two runs with 
a seventh inning double and 
Jackie Calandro drove in a run 
in the fifth with a single. Texas 
Wesleyan scored its runs in the 
sixth, both of them scoring on 
errors. Cindy Berry started on 
the mound for Northwestern 
before Forrester came on in* 
relief. 

On Saturday the Lady 
Demons started out with a 4-1 
win over West Texas State 
with Forrester getting the win 
on the mound. Julie 
Robertson had two doubles to 
knock in two runs, Cindy 



Canoe Shed Hours 
Monday 3:00-5:30 
Tuesday 3:30-5:30 
Wednesday 3:00-5:30 
Thursday 3:30-5:30 
Friday 2:00-4:00 



Wigley had two hits and 
scored twice and Sherri 
Broocks added two hits and an 
RBI. 

In the final contest 
them Iowa scored 
unearned runs in the 
inning to hand the 
Demons a 2-1 defeat, 
thwestern scored its only run 
in the second when Cindy 
Wigley tripled and later scored 
on an error. Manual was again 
the top Lady Demon hitter 
with two base hits in the game. 



Nor- 
two 
fifth 
Lady 
Nor- 



In a doubleheader played 
Monday, the University of 
Houston kept its perfect 
record intact with a 5-1,2-0 
sweep of the Demons. The 
Cougars, ranked fourth in the 
nation, are now 20-0 this 
season, including nine wins by 
shutout. 

Northwestern saw its losing 
streak go to five games against 
the Cougars as their record 
dropped to 12-14 after the 
doubleheader. 

In the first contest the 
Cougars took advantage of six 
Demon errors as only two of 
the five Houston runs were 



run in the second, added three 
in the third and scored its final 
run in the fifth. 

Kevin Warner went the 
distance for Northwestern as 
his record falls to 3-2. Warner 
gave up nine hits while 
walking one and striking out 
two. 

In the second contest 
Demon hurler John Kowalksi 
gave up just six hits, but the 



mm iwo oase nus in me game. earn ^A Houston got a single 

Lady Demon Netters Kip 
Northern Iowa 8-1 



Northwestern's women's 
tennis team snapped a five- 
match losing streak here 
Monday with an 8-1 win over 
Northern Iowa. The Lady 
Demons are now 6-7 on the 
season and Northern Iowa 
stands as 1-1 . 

Northwestern won five 
singles matches in straight 
sets, with Liliana Isaza, 
Begona Fabregas, Mara 



Salano, Pam Aud and Kim 
Tollett claiming wins while 
Karla Tubbs lost at No. 5 
singles in three sets. 

In doubles Isaza and Salano 
won the No. 1 match with a 
three set victory and Aud and 
Tubbs won in straight sets. At 
No. 3 doubles Tollett and 
Carmen Sirera scored a 6-2, 6- 
1 win. 



Front Street Gym 

61 2 Front Street 
Phone 352-8678 
119 Daily 

Instructions for Samra 
men and women Nutrition 

Powerlifting & Bodybuilding 

Lifting, Gloves, Belts, Wraps, Straps, Suits 



SUMMER JOBS i 



* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 




Northwestern 
University Office of 
High School relations 
announces there will 
be summer jobs open 
to all interested 
students. Enrollment 
in summer school is 
the only requirement 
for application. 

The three sessions 
will be: June 5-9; June 
12-16; June 19-23. 

To be assured of a 
fun-filled and exciting 
summer, contact the 
Office of High School 
Relations, Caspari Hall 
(357-5248), and fill 
out a job application. 



FOR NSU STUDENTS 

State 




All Applications must J ?° h r T * ork K ^ 0b o s - 
be in by April 15, ™ h ™ * ' ^ obs " 32 t 
1983 and job in- R ^ plus J 5 9 enera ! 
terviews will be held K2??JW «? 



* 

* 
* 



Friday. Minimum wage. * 



April 18-22. 

APPLY NOW! 



Demons got just three singles 
and failed to score. Houston 
got one in the third on an RBI 
single by Dan Larson and one 
in the fifth on a sacrifice fly by 
Corky Swindell. 

The Demons threatened in 
the fifth when Ronnie Howell 
reached on a fielders choice 
after a walk to David Bailey. 
After Grappe singled Houston 
got a pop-up and a ground out 
to end the innine, 




You need energy 
to get a job! 

Industry and business need customers to 
buy the products they make. They also need 
energy to produce those products. In order to 
supply the needed energy, utility companies 
must take advantage of the most up-to-date 
technology and make full use of every 
available energy source including nuclear 
power and coal. The failure to utilize these 
two sources of energy along with others 
available could seriously jeopardize the 
industrial and economic growth of our entire 
area. And growth is what provides jobs. 
Energy. You need it to get a job. 

LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANIES 
INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 

Centra/ Louisiana [lectrk Company/ Cull Stales Utilities Company 
Louisiana Power & Light Company / New Orleans Public Service inc. 
Southwestern [lectric Power Company 




Why not think seriously about a career in 
the electric utility industry when you're 
meeting with various professional rep- 
resentatives at the end of this semester? 



the 



2 •« * 

* ★★★★★★★★★★ 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LXX No. 22 



Northwestern State University 
Natchitoches, Louisiana 




April 12, 1983 



Natchitoches Dorm Residents 
Faced With Fall Evacuation 



Natchitoches dorm residents 
were informed Thursday that 
starting next Fall semester, 
they would be forced to 
evacuate their rooms in favor 
of the male NSU athletic 
teams, in a move created by 
the acquisition of Caspari 
dorm (formerly the football 
dorm) by the new Louisiana 
High School for the Gifted 
and Talented. 

Mickey Townsend, 
Coordinator of Housing, sent 
out a letter infrorming the 
Natchitoches dorm students of 
the meeting. NSU president 
Dr. Joseph Orze, Demon head 
football coach Sam Goodwin, 
and Director of Student 
Services Sam Smith, attended 
•he meeting. 

Under the new proposal, 
those students who are already 
'iving in Natchitoches dorm 
would be dispersed to several 
other dorms which are par- 
tially unoccupied and located 
31 opposite ends of the 
campus. 

The football team, forced to 
evacuate Caspari, would then 
Jake over the the dorm and use 
"tat as a permanent residence. 

Townsend tried to soften 
"te blow to the Natchitochs 
residents by saying; "Knowing 
""s (change) will displace alot 
at students, especially female 
•udents, I want you all to 
«ow that you will have first 
Pf'onty of any empty space on 
""yaorm on campus." 

After Townsend had 
unshed her say, Orze walked 

dLm added ' "° ne of th e 
jj wiems which this university 

««o deal with is the use of its 
UOr mitories." 

of? added that in order to 
N * et the underutilization of 
u dormS) ,. We had tQ 

tyjv; Som e tough decisions. 

nave two dormitories now 
full a S0fnext year will be half 
N a ,„? Ccordl ng to occupancy, 
Pooches and Louisiana. 

»er e u 8 to ask y° u . if y° u ' 
tile president of a 



e 

"ttiv, 



^fri Sity and had IWO and a 
*ouiH° rmitories to fill, what 



> ld you do?' 

! nued . "and if you were 



Orze 



c ont 

l bavj no witn the decision of 
«m ptv 8 t0 . run two and a 

dor mitories or to 

C , e and fi " two dorms 

<ayi na 7 h uld you do? There's a 
mat says the President 



half 
to 



j has to make the decisions that 
are not necessarily popular 
ones. I will stand up and say 
what I did was done in the best 
interest of the university and 
of all people concerned." 

Orze finished his 
justification of the issue by 
saying that if the students 
would look at the situation 
and come up with a better 
solution, he would accept it. 
"I'll give you a week to solve 
it," he said, "if in a week it 
isn't solved, the decision 
stands." 

Natchitoches dorm resident 
Leah Sherman asked Orze why 
the football players could not 
be moved to West Rapides and 
Orze replied that "that 
solution would have to be 
worked out with the athletic 
department." 

Goodwin spoke next and 
asked if the students wanted a 
successful football program. 
"I would hope that you want 
that kind of program as much 
to make you give up 
something, and I hope that it's 
not much that you have to give 
up," he said. 

He went on to say, "If we 
had a choice, we would be in 
Louisiana," citing the suite 
type situation that exists there 
and is popular among other 
big-time athletic departments. 

Later, Chuck Dupree, an 
NSU football player said, 
"alot of students think we're 
animals. If we could just move 
into Louisiana Hall, we could 
prove that we're not. We need 
to know where we're going to 
be next semester whether it be 
West Rapides or whatever." 

Another Northwestern 
football player added that 
"there's time now that we 
could fix up Rapides if that's 
where we have to go-painting 
the walls or whatever. I don't 
want to make anybody mad. 
It's a no win stuation for 
everybody. 

Several Natchitoches, and 
other dorm, residents were 
critical of the plan. Student 
Government Association 
president Deanna Grau urged 
dorm residents to submit 
alternatives to the situation. 

One Natchitoches dorm 
resident Donna Jo Kelly, in a 
letter to Goodwin, stated that 
the athletic department were 
given options between dorms 



that they prefereed living in, 
and after turning down West 
Rapides, Natchitoches dorm 
was decided upon. However 
the residents of Natchitoches 
dorm were not given a choice 
of whether to go or stay. 

Kelly's letter went on to 
point out the contradiction in 
a previous statement by Orze 
in which he said that, "if the 
only reason that you stay at 
Northwestern is because of the 
dormitory that you live in, 
then Northwestern is failing 
you." 

Kelly's letter pointed out 
that one of the arguments for 
moving the athletes was in 
fact, because of recruiting 
athletes. (For more on the 
issue, see Page 4) 



Ag Club Rodeo 
Here Wednesday 



The Northwestern 
Agriculture Club Rodeo 
featuring competition for 
inexperienced NSU students, 
area youth and amateurs is 
scheduled for April 14-16 at 
the Natchitoches Parish 
Fairgronds Arena. 

An all-NSU student show 
will be held Thursday, April 
14, at 7:30 p.m., and an open 
show for experienced 
amatuers and professionals is 
set for Friday, April 15, at 
7:30 p.m. The popular Little 
Wranglers performance for 
youngsters 15 and under will 
be conducted Saturday, April 
16, at 5 p.m. 

The DeWitt and Lewis 
Rodeo Company of 
Alexandria, one of the top 
stock contractors in the 
professional Louisiana Rodeo 
Cowboys Association, is 
producing this year's NSU 
Agriculture Club Rodeo. 

Tickets for each per- 
formance will be $3 for adults 
and $2 for students and 
children. Gates will open one 
hour prior to performance 
times. 

The all-NSU student show 
will feature competition in 
bull riding, barebace bronc 
riding, chute dogging, wild 
cow milking, wild horse race, 
goat sacking and calf 
scramble. 



Southerland Appointed 
Executive Vice-President 



Dr. T h o m a s P a u I 
Southerland, an administrator 
at Northwestern for the past 
17 years, has been appointed 
to the position of executive 
vice-president of NSU. 

Southerland's appointment, 
which was approved recently 
by the Board of Trustees for 
Louisiana Colleges and 
Universities, will become 
effective July li 

Northwestern president Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze, who an- 
nounced the appointment this 
week, said Southerland will 
continue to serve as the 
university's vice-president of 
academic affairs, the position 
he has held since 1978. 

Southerland, a native of 
Bossier City, was employed in 
the state's public school 
systems for 19 years before 
joining the Northwestern staff 
in 1966 as dean of (he College 
of Education. 

After serving for nine years 
as Northwestern'* education 
dean, Southerland was ap- 
pointed dean of the NSU 
Graduate School in 1975. 
Three years later, the widely- 
recognized authority in 
education became the 
university's vice-president of 
academic affairs. 

As North western's 
education dean, Southerland 
was instrumental in 
establishing admission 
standards for teacher eduation 
and developing 14 new 
programs. Specialist and 
doctorate degrees in education 
wre also established during his 
tenure as dean. 

Under his administration, 
the College of Education 



achieved full accreditation of 
all programs by the National 
Council for the Accreditation 
of Teacher Education. Also, 
the Teacher Education Center 
and Laboratory School and 
the Health and Physical 
Education Majors' Building 
were designed and con- 
structed. 

Souihci land's honros while 
serving at Northwestern in- 
clude select ion for faculty 
membership in Phi Kappa Phi 
naional academic homo 
society in 1972, the Service 
Award in 1972 and runner-up 
for Natchilochc,s Parish Man 
of the Year in 1972. 

He has also deliered more 
than 40 major addresses on 
education and has authored 
several articles in prestigious 
professional journals. 

Southerland began his 
education career in 1947 in 
Rapides Parish as a high 
school mathematics teacher 
and coach at Bolton High 
School in Alexandrai. He 
later served as principal of 
Cherokee 'Elementary School, 
principal of Alexandria Junior 
High and as supervisor of 
instruction and assistant 
superintendent of instruction 
for the Rapides Parish School 
Board. 

Northwestcrn's new 
executive vice-president and 
vice-president of academic 
affairs has served as president 
of the Rapides Parish 
Louisiana Teachers 
Association the Louisiana 
Supervisors Association and 
of Phi Delta Kappa at Nor- 
thwestern. 



History Repeats Itself 



Remember the red measles 
scare that threatened an entire 
sorority and a few others here 
last fall? Well, it seems that 
there is another red measles 
outbreak that has threatened 
to send quite a few people 
home from school for an 
extended "rest". 

Happily though, this 
outbreak is not here, or even 
in Louisiana for that matter, 
this time the victim are from 
the universities of Indiana, 
Purdue, and Houston. 

It seems as though there 
were several students from 
each of these schools visiting 
the Land of Sun and Fun 



(Florida) over the Spring 
Break, and among other 
things, students there picked 
up the red measles virus. 

Now before you stop with 
your plans to go to Florida for 
the rest of the Spring and 
Summer, remember that 
chances are that you have 
already been inoculated for 
the disease. 

When the outbreak was 
reported here, almost all of the 
people who had come in 
contact with the original 
carrier had been given the 
necessary shots when they 
were alot younger. 



Current Sauce Page 2, April 12, 1983 



Ten New Insiders Chosen For Summer University Driving Record Excellent 



By Pat Skidmore 

Ten students will serve as 
staff members of the 5th 
"Inside View," a freshmen 
summer orientation program 
at NSU. These "Insiders" 
and six alternates were chosen 
from among 40 applicants: 

Harlan Harvey, junior 
public relations major from 
Natchitoches; Darlene Brown, 
junior home economics major 
from Oakdale; Dane 
Broussard, sophomore ac- 
counting major from Houma; 
Karen Hix, senior office 
administrative major from 
Natchitoches; Charla Cook, 
sophomore nursing major 
from Houma; Janice Duggan 
junior psychology/computer 



technology major from 
Alexandria, Ginger Francis, 
freshman elementrv education 
major from ! Alexandria; 

Chris Maggio, 
freshman physical educaton 
major from Natchitoches; 
Laurie Weaver, sophomore 
physical education with dance 
emphasis major from Vivian; 
Bill Welch, freshman com- 
puter science major from 
Natchitoches and alternates 
Cindy Bordelon, freshman 
physical education with dance 
emphasis major from 
Marksville; Lola Boone, 
sophomore general studies 
major from Gretna; Steve 
Estep, senior business with 



Champlin Addresses NSU 



Charles Champlin, Arts 
Editor and columnist for the 
Los Angeles Times spoke as 
part of the Northwestern 
Lecture Series. The lecture 
began at 9:30 a.m. and was 
held in Kyser Hall 
Auditorium. 

Champlin graduated Cum 
Laude from Harvard 
University with a degree in 
English. He has worked with 
Time Magazine and Life 
Magazine before joining the 
Los Angeles Times. 



Among the topics Champlin 
discussed was this years 
Academy Award nominations. 

Champlin explained briefly 
how nominations are made, 
and how Oscar winners are 
chosen. 

• As a film critic, Champlin 
agreed with the nomination of 
E.T. the Extra-Terrestial as a 
fine movie production. He 
gave his opinion on the 
nominations for best movie, 
best and supporting actors, 
and best and supporting 
actresses. 



prelaw emphasis major from 
Bossier; Eeanna Grau, junior 
publics relations major from 
Shreveport and Jeff Shifflett, 
sophomore computer science 
major from Natchitoches. 

Barbara Gillis, Coordinator 
for Orientation and Freshmen 
Programs said, "We can't 
have all of one type, we look 
for enough talents to put forth 
a total group, people that 
complement each other". 
She went on, "If one of the 
ten can't come, an alternate 
would closely replace the 
strength of what the person 
was selected for". 

For the first time, training 
for the Insiders/alternates will 
be during two weekend ' 
workshops in April and May. 
Each Insider has an assigned 
committee, check-in, caboret, 
or organizational, for 
example. Many return to help 
in the orientation assemblies 
each semester. Each receives 
$300 at the end of the program 
as well as free meals, room 
and board. 

The program, designed for 
recent high school graduates 
produces campus leaders and 
those active at an earlier time 
than those who don't, 
commented Gillis. Last 
summer, all but seven returned 
to attend NSU. 



Whether it's a 75 chevy 
sedan or an 82 ford sedan, you 
can bet the operator is a safe 
driver. 

NSU's 85 vehicles traveled 
851,359 miles during the fiscal 
year: July 1, 1982 - June 30, 
1982. Within that period, 
there were only three accidents 
(of which we were at fault) - 
nevertheless, an outstanding 
record. 

Physical Plant Director, 
Loran Lindsey stated, "The 
bulk of our off-campus travel 
for class purpose is made from 
here to Fort Polk, England 
AFB and Shreveport." He 
noted many miles were driven 
under adverse conditions, rain 
or early morning fog, for 
example. 

Of the total mileage, 
543,509 were pool, meaning 
driven by faculty. And 83,450 
belonged to Nursing - 
Shreveport. The latter are 
treated as motor pool vehicles, 
commented Lindsey. A few 
administrative and academic 
departments have their own 
"departmental" vehicles. 
NSU - Fort Polk has their 
own. Other classifications are 
"general travel" for 
organizations and athetics, 
"farm", and "maintenance." 

Regarding insurance, The 
Office of Risk Management, 



which handles all state 
agencies, reduces the 
universities annual premium in 
terms of a credit on the next 
premium based on the per. 
centage of accidents or driving 
Record. 

Lindsey added that with the 
efforts of Faculty, staff and 
maintenance, the vehicles are 
kept in the best possible shaue. 

Reuche To Be 
Guest Speaker 

Dr. Suanne Roueche, a 
nationally known educator in 
literacy programs in higher 
education will address the 
faculty at Northwestern on 
April 13. 

Dr. Roueche, from the 
University of Texas at Austin 
is the featured consultant for 
seminars being hosted by the 
College Success Programs 
under the College of Basic 
Studies. 

Dr. Roueche will discuss 
current trends in basic literacy 
programs and The College I 
Success Program at Nor- 
thwestern. 

A session is scheduled for 
9:00-10:30 a.m. and again at 
3:00-4:30 p.m. in Rm. 142 
Kyser Auditorium. 



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provide you with the same 
professional silk screen 
services you were receiving 
from the Top Shop. 



Current Sauce Page 3, April 12, 1983 



Dr. Bill Bryant Pens 
Book On Armadillos 



Dr. Bill Bryant of Nor- 
thwestern has written and 
illustrated "The Armadillo 
Book," a humorous collection 
of .122 caricatures and car- 
toons featuring an animal that 
has established itself in the 
folklore of several Southern 
and Southwestern states. 

Published recently by the 
Pelican Publishing Company 
of Gretna, "The Armadillo 
Book" will sell for $3.95. It 
will be available at major book 
stores throughout Louisiana 
and in other states across the 
South and South- 
west. Bryant's pen and ink 
drawings are, according to the 
publisher, "delightfully 
humorous" and document the 
antics of a strange looking 
animal that "can readily be 



America's highways." 

The NSU professor and Art 
Department chairman has 
been illustrating the armadillo 
for some three years. The 122 
drawings for "The Armadillo 
Book" were completed within 
one year. "But I have enough 
drawings to produce another 
book," said Bryant, who will 
be promoting the book this 
month at the Book Fair in 
Dallas and at the Texas 
Library Convention in San 
Antonio. 



identified 
scalelike 
elongated 
propensity 



by its tough, 
coat of armor, 
snout and its 
for doing battle 



with 18 wheel vehicles on 



Menu for S.U. Cafeteria 

Tues: Fried Chicken, 
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce, 
Polish Sausage & Kraut. 

Wed: Roast Beef, Lasagna, 
Tuna Noodle Casserole. 

Thurs: Fried Catfish, Liver & 
Onions, Beef Chow Mein. 

Fri: 2 oz. Fish, Chicken & 
Dumplings, Frito Pie. 



Menu for Iberville 

April 12-16 

Tues: Lunch - Chuckwagon 
on Bun, Red Beans & Rice. 
Dinner - Tacos, Beef 
Stroganoff. 

Wed: Lunch - Hamburgers, 
Tamale Pie. Dinner - Steak, 
Fried Shrimp. 

Thurs: Lunch - Italian 
Sausage, Turkey Gumbo. 
Dinner - Baked Ham, Beef 
Pot Pie. 

Fri: Lunch ■ Hot Turkey 
Sandwich, Ravioli. Dinner - 
Grilled Patty Melt, Fried Fish. 

Sat. Lunch Meatball 
Sandwich, Ground Beef & 
Green Bean Casserole. 
Dinner - Baked Chicken, 
Pancakes & Sausage. 



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SUMMER JOBS 

FOR NSU STUDENTS 



Northwestern State 
University Office of 
High School relations 
announces there will 
be summer jobs open 
to all interested 
students. Enrollment 
in summer school is 
the only requirement 
for application. 

The three sessions 
will be: June 5-9; June 
12-16; June 19-23. 

To be assured of a 
fun-filled and exciting 
summer, contact the 
Office of High School 
Relations, Caspari Hall 
(357-5248), and fill 

out a job application. 6 hour work jobs, 
All Applications must 5Q hQur work job ^ 32 

e by . Apn K 15 ' RA's plus 15 general 
tin® .. L h m workers - Mond ^ and I 

ApriM W 8 S 22 Friday. Minimum wage. J 




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Faculty Appointed To DOA-LSAC Staff 



Three faculty members at 
Northwestern have been 
selected to serve one-year 
terms on professional advisory 
panels for the Louisiana 
Division of the Arts and the 
Louisiana State Arts Council. 

Thomas N. Whitehead, 



assistant professor of mass 
communications, was ap- 
pointed as a member of the 
DOA-LSAC media panel, and 
serving on the literature panel 
are Dr. Mildred H. Bailey, 
professor and head of the 
Department of Elementary 



Education, and Mrs. Ann 
Black, assistant professor of 
English. 

The Louisiana Division of 
the Arts and the Louisiana 
State Arts Council engage the 
services of advisory panels to 
review grant applications- 



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Opinion 

Current Sauce 
Page 4 

The Opinions expressed on Ihis page are strictly those of the author. I hey 
do not neccessarily express the view of this paper, the sludenl body of 
NSU, or (he administration. The Current Sauce accepts all articles and 
letters. All correspondence must be signed and a phone number must 
accompany it. Guest editorials are accepted but they too must be signed. 
The Current Sauce reserves the right to edit any articles that come into 
our office, deleting anything that may be considered libelous. All articles 
must be turned in no later than the Thursday preceding publication. 



EPA Beginning To Look Like Waterloo 



We Just Want To Stay 



(Editor's Note: As you can see by the front page, there seems to 
be quite a ruckus brewing about the relocating of Natchitoches 
and Caspari dorm residents. The following guest editorial was 
co-written by several Natchitoches dorm residents.) 

The decision to move all male athletes into Natchitoches 
dormitory, at the expense of having to relocate some 150 fee- 
paying, largely non-scholarship students seems to be just a 
"little" unfair. 

With the acquisition of Casperi dorm by the new Gifted and 
Talented High School, the football players are now without a 
dorm. So, in their infinite wisdom, the athletic department 
figured to give them "our" dorm as compensation. Of course, 
we, the students who are paying to go to this university were 
given no say-so in the matter, except a token proposal of, "you 
have one week to figure out a better solution, or else you leave 
this dorm." We really kind of imagine that it took the athletic 
department and our president a little LONGER than one week 
to figure out THEIR proposal. At least we hope it did. 

So, a meeting was caned and we were "allowed" to hear the 
reasons why we would be forced to evacuate the building we 
have been calling home for the last several years. 

Demon Head Football Coach Sam Goodwin said that if we 
wanted a good football program we would have to give up 
something. Dr. Orze said there were no other options. What? 
And now, after he said that, he is giving us a week to solve the 
problem. 

Dr. Orze also said that we would have two half-filled dorms 
next fall. Where are all the figures coming from? 

Coach Goodwin said that newer, brighter dorms were a key 
selling point to new recruits. Although this was in direct con- 
tradiction to Dr. Orze's statement of, "If the only reason that 
you stay at Northwestern is because of the dormitory that you 
live in, then Northwestern is failing you," it also is a pretty weak 
argument. 




By John L. Hess 



In Napoleon's army, every 
soldier carried a marshal's 
baton in his knapsack. In 
Reagan's army, every recruit 
seems to carry a hit list. 

Young Louis Cordia drew 
up his list in the early months 
of the Reagan revolution. He 
was toiling for the Heritage 
Foundation, a 
hotbed of 
policy and 
talent for the 
new regime. 

Louis's ass- 
ignment was 
the En- 
vironmental 
Protection A- 
gency. With praiseworthy 
attention to detail, he can- 
vassed the pollutin lobbies and 
drew up judgments on hun- 
dreds of EPA staff members. 
He also produced a list of 
suitably anti-environmental 
replacements. 

It was only natural that 
Louis himself would be 
rewarded with a key job at 
EPA. It was perhaps 
inevitalbe that he would 
ultimately be purged himself. 

Kenneth Adelman did not 
prepare his own hit list. When 
he was tapped to head the 
arms control agency, a memo 
was handed to him by its chief 
negotiator on strategic arms, 
Edward Rowny. 

Adelman's nomination got 
into trouble because he fudged 
about that list before a Senate 
committee, because it included 
two congressmen who favored 
arms control among those to 



be frozen out of the 
discussions, and because he 
had written on the memo 
(which he had forgotten), 
"these are Ed's real views." 

Ed's real views were similar 
to Ken's views, expressed in a 
paper for another rightist 
think tank nearly five years 
ago. In it, he deplored SALT I 
and SALT II, which was then 
pending, and expressed the 
hope that SALT III would be 
flung on the dung-heap of 
history. That Ken said, would 
end the nonsense about 
detente. 

Regan's first appointee for 
the arms control job, Walter 
Rostow, seemed to have the 
same outlook; he said at his 
confirmation hearing that he 
didn't see what there was to 
negotiate about. 

But as sometimes happens 
with bureaucrats, Rostow 
became seduced by the idea of 
actually accomplishing 
something. He endorsed a ' 
tentative deal with Moscow on 
cutting back missiles in 
Europe, and he had to be 
fired. 

Revolutions devour their 
young, but this one has been 
remarkable in its appetite. 
The Reign of Terror did not 
begin until four years after the 
taking of the Bastille. Here, it 
began on Inauguration Day. 

On that occasion, 
Alexander Haig submitted a 
memo claiming sole command 
of foreign policy. His policy, 
including a virtual declaration 
of- war in Central America, 
was quite acceptable. His 
pretension was not. 

Soon Cap Weinberger and 



Jeane Kirkpatrick, the am- 
bassador to the UN, were 
publicly squabbling with Haig 
.and White House sources were 
slipping him the shiv with the 
media. Eventually, he had to 
go. 

Policy differences have had 
little to do with the 
bloodletting in this ad- 
ministration. For Haig, the 
breaking point was over 
precedence, symbolized by his 
place in the receiving line. For 
others, it was survival. 

When toxic wastes hit the 
fan at EPA, Rita Lavelle was 
found to have wildly accused a 
colleague of trying to enforce 
the law, Ed Meese said he 
hardly knew her and Anne 
Gorsuch Burford-to-be fired 
her. 

The heat continued, and 
others went to the scaffold. 
Among them was Mrs. 
Burford. Reagan said she had 
done a great job and he would 
never have asked her to leave. 
Naturally, he blamed the 
media. 

Actually, his top aides had 
been sowing off-the-record 
allegations that Mrs. Burford 
was incompetent, that she was 
competent but implicated in 
scandalous doings and that she 
was an embarrassment to the 
administration. She finally 
took the hint. 

The tumbrils are rolling. 
After Danton came 
Robespierre. After EPA, 
what next? In every 
Washington henhouse, the 
foxes brought in to guard the 
chickens must be trembling. 



SGA Amendments 



Several years ago, we had a brand new athletic field house, 
arguably the best in the state, and a brand new astro-turf 
football field and they said that this would bring in the recruits. 
Well now, you can look at this statement in one of two ways. 

First, if it is true, then why would you risk losing the potential 
two thousand new freshmen coming to Northwestern who will 
have to live in the "Dispersement" dorms, from the ap- 
proximately 25 new football players who come in each year? 

Second, if you want to argue that a winning football season 
brings in the recruits, then let it be known that our football team 
has been consistently ranked in the Top Twenty in Division 1- 
AA for the past several years, and probably the biggest reason 
we haven't been invited to a post-season tournament is not our 
dorm rooms, but the fact that we don't have a television station 
here that can generate the much needed media attention. 

We don't want to sound like a bunch of radicals just looking 
for a fight. We just want to be able to live in our dorm. Our 
dorm provides us with several important advantages, not the last 
of which is our SAFETY. Since it is close to the main learning 
building (Kyser Hall) and right across the street from the center 
of student activities (Student Union) we feel at least semi-safe 
when we walk back to the dorm. Fortunately for us, that place is 
at last semi-lighted. Not as much can be said for other dorms on 
campus. 

All we ask is for a littlle consideration. It is our sincere 
opinion that in this instance, "the needs of the many outweigh 
the needs of the few." 



ARTICLE X - STUDENT MEDIA 



Section 1. Student Media Board 
CI. I. The Sludenl Media Board is designated 
by ihe SGA as the de facto board of 
publishers/directors for sludenl media and 
will be responsible directly to the President of 
ihe University. The student media is defined 
as ihe Current Sauce. Potpourri, Argus, and 
KNWD-FM. All will all relate lo ihe Sludenl 
Media Board in t he same way thai a 
publication/radio station is responsible to its 
board of publishers/directors. 
CI. 2. The Board will be a strong and active 
Board. 

CI. 3. The Studeni Media Board will not act 
as a censorship agency, nor will it take any 
actions which are not appropriate in light of 
curreni ethical or legal situations related to 
student media university campuses. 
CI. 4. Functions of the Studeni Media will be: 

(a) Provide University -level broad guidelines 
to the publications/radio station. 

(b) Recommend to the President of the 
University the name of a faculty/staff member 
to serve as faculty advisor for each 
publication/radio station. 

(c) Select through the specified process the 
editor of each pubication and the station 
manager of KNWD-FM, with subsequent 
approval of the Student Senate. 

(d) Recommend to the President of ihe 
University the name of a faculty/staff member 
to serve as budget approving agent for each 
publication/KNWD-FM. 

(e) Review the operational guidelines 
developed for each publication and the radio 
siation jointly by the editors/station manager 
and the advisors. 

(0 Approve/disapprove annual budgets 
(with any periodic reviews thereof) for each 
publication and the radio station, wiih sub- 
sequent approval of the Student Senate. 

(g) Define ihe relationships which the 
publications and the radio siation will have 
with the media-oriented academic programs, 
Studeni Affairs and the SGA. 



(h) Provide a forum for problems which 
may arise from time to time, with the option to 
make suitable recommendations to the 
President of the University should 
unresoh able situations occur. 

(i) Keep the President of the University 
informed of any known or pending ac- 
complishments, problems, or needs. 

CI. 5. The Studeni Media Board shall be 
organized as follows: 

(a) Chairman - Assistant to the President for 
External Affairs. (NOTE: Votes only in case 
of tie vote.) 

(b) Vice Chairman - Chairman, SGA 
Student Media Committee. 

(c) Member - Dean of Students and Chief 
Student Affairs Officer. 

(d) Member - Head. Department of 
Language Arts (or that person's designee). 

(e) Member - Designee of Head. Department 
of Language Arts. 

(0 Member - Student with major associated 
wiih media and/or requisite experiential 
background; appointed by the SGA from a 
consolidated list composed of recom- 
mendations made by Department Head of 
Language Arts, and from at-large student 
applications received by the SGA. 

(g) Member - Student selected /appointed as 
indicated in CI. 5 (0 immediately preceding. 

(h) Member - Student selected/appointed as 
indicated in CI. 5 (0 immediately preceding. 

(i) The editor of each student publication, 
the General Manager of KNWD-FM. the 
advisor of each student publication and 
KNWD-FM, and the University Comptroller ' 
ait will serve as ex-officio members of the 
Board. 



SECTION 2. Current Sauce 
Cl. 1. The official newspaper of the Student 
Government Association shall be the Curreni 
Sauce. A representaiive from the Current 



Sauce shall attend all Student Senate meetings, 
and the minutes of each meeting shall be 
printed in the Current Sauce. 
CI. 2. The staff of the Current Sauce shall 
determine at the beginning of each semester 
the frequency of publication and publication 
date, with the approval of the Student Media 
Board. 

CI. 3. Scholarship positions on the Current 
Sauce will not exceed five full-rime scholar- 
ships, including the Editor and Business 
Manager. 

Cl. 4. The Student Media Board shall 
nominate an Editor-in-Chief of the Current 
Sauce from a list of qualified candidates, with 
the approval ofthe Student Senate. 
Cl. 5. To be eligible for the editorship of the 
Current Sauce, the candidate must have 
completed at least 45 semester hours, including 
at least 3 hours of reporting and 3 hours of 
editing with at least a 2.0 overall average. He 
must have served on the Current Sauce staff at 
least one semester prior to his selection. 
Cl. 6. If no one files for the office of Editor- 
in-Chief who meets the qualifications, the 
Student media Board may select the best 
'qualified candidate, wiih the approval of the 
Student Senate. 

Cl . 7. Candidates aspiring to obtain the office 
of Editor-in-Chief of the Current Sauce shall 
file a "Notice of Intention" with the Student 
Media Board containing the name of the 
proposed Businss Manager and ihe other most 
important staff members. The Board shall 
determine whether or not each candidate is 
qualified to serve in the position to which he is 
appointed. 

Cl. 8. In cooperation with the staff of the 
newspaper, the Editor-in-Chief shall direct the 
policies of his particular publication; he shall 
be directly responsible for its publication and 
its contents. 

Cl. 9. The Editor shall be responsible also for 
m^iniainina a publication of the best possible 



Slobberville Rre Destroys NSZoo Campus 



A devastating fire broke out 
late last night somewhere 
behind Slobberville cafeteria 
and quickly spread across the 
NSZoo campus engulfing 
buildings and students. 
Preliminary reports show 
losses at several million dollars 
and police say that well over 
half of the NSZoo student 
population 1200 have perished 
in the blaze. 

Natchitoches Parish Fire 
Marshal Arson N. Matches 
said that the fire, initially 
starting in the Slobberville 
cafeteria, quickly engulfed the 
serving establishment and in 
minutes the building was 
leveled. 

„ From there the fire spread 
to Rapides dorm and shortly 
after it reached the dorm, a 
tremendous explosion ripped 
through that building, leveling 
it. Marsha' Matches said, 
"Apparently the fire hit a case 
of vodka that was located 
somewhere on the fourth 
floor. It was probably near 
the baseball part of the dorm, 
but we can't be sure." 

While the fire was ripping 
away at Rapides dorm, a diner 
who was caught in the 
Slobberville fire, and was 
himself ablaze, ran screaming 
wildly into Sabine dorm, 
catching that dorm on fire. 

Firemen were able to save 
the outer structere of Sabine 
but the entire insides were 
gutted. 

A sudden shift in he wind 
moved the blaze to Freek Hill, 
where it quickly devoured the 
delapidated buildings on 
NSZoo's last existing mor- 
tgaged property. 

From there the fire spread 
quickly to the Saudi Arabian 
dorm but for some mysterious 
seemed to almost avoid it, and 
didn't even singe the bricks. 

After bypassing the Saudi 
dorm, the fire spread to 
Natchitoches dorm and in just 
seconds the coed dorm was a 
blazing inferno. Hundreds of 
students perished in the dorm, 
where most of the casualties 
happened. 

It was at about this point 
'hat Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber Co. was called in and 
they dumped tons of water on 
'he fire from the Goodyear 
bl >mp. The fire was all but 
stopped when the blimp 
me lted from the intense heat 
and the whole crew plunged 
"tto the fire. It was gross. 

Finally about 4:30 a.m., the 
,lre was brought under 
c °ntrol, but not before it had 



swept clean across half the 
campus and threatened to 
wipe out the rest of the classes 
for the Spring semester. 



However, NSZoo Presideni, 
Dr. J. Orgy promised that 
classes would continue under a 
circus lent in Caldwell Hall. 




The remains of the NSZoo campus after the 

(devastating fire that destroyed several million 
"ollars of school property and left over 600 dead. 



Crazed Ducks Eating 
Terrified Townspeople 



Three NSZoo students have 
been eaten alive, and another 
seven have had body parts 
ripped off as the so-called 
"Killer Ducks" continue to 
strike fear on the NSZoo 
campus. 

Waterfowl biologists from 
around trie world have been 
sent here to try and discover 
why the ducks, usually tame 
and willing to eatFROMyour 
hand instead OF your hand, 
have been attacking people. 

Dr. Wadder Fowle, of the 
United States Department of 
the Interior suspects that the 
cause of the duck attacks has 
to do with the chemicals found 
in the sludge pit at the east end 
of Lake Chaplin. 

"I have found various 
quantities of an unknown 
chemical that scientists have 
never before uncovered 
anywhere in the world, except 
in the rivers of the Amazon," 
Dr. Fowle said. 

NSZoo Biology Department 
head, Dr. Razor 
Vegetablegarden, agreed with 



Fowles theory and added a few 
thoughts of his own. 

"Three years ago, I was 
commissioned to do a study on 
the sludge pit. In my study, I 
noted the potentially 
dangerous effects that the 
sludge, which is being poured 
jin from the industries plant 
behind the lake, has on the 
marine animals found there. 
My preliminary reports 
suggest that the ducks have 
been ingesting quantities of 
dioxin and nuclear radiation. . 
If this continues, the two 
dozen or more ducks on this 
lake could wipe out the entire 
populaton of Natchitoches." 

The roommate of one 
NSZoo student who was 
dragged off by the ducks into 
the murky waters of Lake 
Chaplain implored the 
government to do something 
about this situation. 

"If you saw what I did," 
NSZoo Junior Sociology 
major Karen VanTrollop said, 
"then you would realize the 
need to do something. Mitzi 



Current Sausage Head 
Killed By Picturebook 



Current Sausage Editor, 
Vendetta N. Slapstick was 
gunned down early yesterday 
morning, and hours later, 
Campus Insecurity head 
General Robert E. Lee an- 
nounced that the NSZoo 
police had captured their chief 
suspect, NSZoo Potofporridge 
editor, Izod Picturebook. 

Police say Slapstick was shot 
27 ties from close range at 
approximately 6:30 am. as he 
went through trash cans al 
Loseranna Dorm, apparently 
looking for ideas for next 
week's paper. 

Police also said thai Pic- 
turebook had followed 
Slapstick from his house to the 
dorm before shooting him. 

A terrified NSZoo coed saw 
the shooting and quickly 
phoned Campus Insecurity 
because she was afraid that 
Professional Fishfood 
Mismanagement, NSZoo's 
meal people, would take the 
bloody victim and make a 
casserole out of him. 

When police arrived on the 
scene, they found the bullet 
riddled body of Slapstick 
slumped against the trash can 
with an old issue of the 
Current Sausage stuffed in his 
mouth. 

The eyewitness told police 
that she saw an unidentified 
person skipping down the hall 



wearing a pink alligator shirt, 
plaid pants and argylc socks. 

Police i m m c d i a I c I y 
suspected members of t lie 
radical left-wing Preppy 
Panthers terrorist group, bin 
they were all in Syria having 
an exchange with the Palestine 
Liberation Organization 
(PLO). 

Campus Insecurity then got 
an anonymous tip from an 
anonymus person, saying that 
they would find I he killer and 
the murder weapon in his 
dorm. 

General Lee ✓obtained the 
search warrant and stormed 
Piciurebook's room where 
they found him slicking pins in 
a Slapstick doll. 
t- Picturebook is being held in 
lieu of $2 million bond, while 
prosecutor's decide what kind 
of sentence to ask for. 

Sources close lo the case say 
that District Attorney Owen 
Marshmcllow will probably 
ask the jury to forego the 
electric chair, and ask (hat 
Picturebook be required 
instead, to be editor of the 
Current Sausage for a year. 

A spokesman for Pic- 
iurebook's lawyer. Perry 
Mason, said that sentence 
would constitute cruel and 
unusual punishment, and 
instead, they will ask for the 
electric chair. 



-KM* Ms 




A pair of the so-called "Killer Ducks", just 
moments before they attacked Current Sausage 
photographer "Zoom" Lynns. Lynns escaped 
from the deathly grasp of the two birds, but not 
before losing three toes and most of his 
kneecaps. (NSZoo photo by "Zoom" Lynns ) 



Current Sausage Lampoon, Page 2 

R. Polk Becomes 
Independent University 



NSZoo-Ft. Polk has severed 
all relations with the Nat- 
chitoches campus in a surprise 
move announced yesterday by 
Ft. Polk campus provost, Dr. 
Dodger Worst. 
Dr. Worst, in a letter to 

President Dr. J.J. Orgy, 
announced that since the Ft. 
Polk campus' enrollment 
recently surpassed that of the 
main NSZoo campus, he was 
going to start a whole new 
independent college much like 
the "University of New 
Orleans did when they broke 
with LSU." 

In the memo, Dr. Worst 
referred to the new university 
as the "Commuter State 
University." 

Reports of the planned 
separation of the two cam- 
puses first surfaced last 
December when it was 
reported by NSZoo's un- 
derground radical newspaper, 
"The News Bureau Sauce", 
that 416 NSZoo students were 
commuting to the Ft. Polk 
campus to avoid several 
particularly tough subjects 
taught by teachers here. 

One student, Jack McAbel, 
said that he was, and still is, 
involved with the commuting, 
and will probably enroll at the 



Ft. Polk campus as a full-time 
student in the Fall of 1983. 

"I had pursued 106 hours 
here at NSZoo," McAbel said, 
"but I had only passed 27 
hours. At Ft. Polk, I had 
passed nine out of nine, hours 
and had a 4.0 g.p.a. At 
NSZoo I had a point sixty- 
three." 

Another NSZoo student, 
Toucan Sam, had starred as an 
All-America linebacker at the 
main campus. However, he. 
will forego his senior year of 
eligibility in order to be a full- 
time student at Ft. Polk. 

"It got to a point, that I had 
to choose between getting my 
degree in "Greek System" and 
pulling down $50,000 a year as 
an alumni advisor, or getting 
drafted by the United States 
Football League (USFL) and 
only getting $12,500 a year, 
getting my brains busted. 
Hey, I'm getting married soon 
and I need the cash," Sam 
said. 

NSZoo Students Against 
Government President Adolph 
Slameface, himself a regular 
visitor at Ft. Polk, said that all 
students wishing to resist this 
mandate should meet in Room 
412 of the Student Onion. 



Dr. D. Mannd Curve, Noted 
Economies Prof Expires 

From Oxygen Loss 

Dr. D. Mannd Curve, 
NSZoo's noted professor of 
economics, died yesterday 
morning at 8:45 following his 
explanation of the 
"Equilibrium Unemployment 
Level in Non-Consolidated 
Consumer Households as 
Opposed to the Private Sector 
Income of Non- 
Conglomerated and Socially 
Independent Laboratory 
Mice." 

Dr. Curve had been 
speaking to the 38 member 
Economics 287 class for 45 
non-stop minutes until his 
oxygen supply was depleted 
and his lungs collapsed. 

Dr. Curve was rushed to the 
NSZoo infirmary but frantic 
attempts to rescue him by 
Nurse Hott Tange and Dr. 
Marcus Welby M.D. proved 
futile. 

NSZoo President Dr. J.J. 
Orgy declared this Saturday to 
be an official day of mourning 
and dismissed all classes. 



NSZoo lady In 
Bondage Winner 



Mill LI B 




Roxanne Steroids was named the recent winner 

of the NSZoo Student Onion Governing Bored's 
second annual LADIES IN BONDAGE 
BEAUTY PAGEANT. Ms. Steroids was 
selected over three other girls for the prestigous 
award. 



rrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrtt t t ttt t ****** t tiitft-* 



*******+***+*•*++*+•*+ * +**•**** — «• +— * + — *4 



DIM Offenders To 
Face Tough Times 



In response to a Louisiana" 
Legislature law regarding 
penalties for DWI (Driving 
While Intoxicated), the city 
counsil of the city of Nat- 
chitoches yesterday adopted 
those measures and added new 
ones in order to "crack down 
on the number of college 
punks who drive and drink," 
according to NSZoo Chief of 
Police Harry Kojak. 

According to Kojak, 
penalties for the first DWI 
offense will be loss of an arm 
and your first born. "We feel 
that by taking the DWI of- 
fender's arm, it inhibits 



his/her ability to handle the 
steering wheel and a bottle at 
the same time. We see a 
definite decrease in the 
number first time offenders 
breaking the law for a second 
time," Kojak said. 

Kojak went on to say, "If 
the fool decided to break the 
law again, he or she will be 
neutered, and this will be done 
without an anisthetic." 

"Of course," Kojak went 
on, "there will be some jerks 
who just can't get enough, and 
if they're caught a third time, 
it's the electric chair." 



• • § 



Killer Ducks 

..continued from page 1 




Wacky 
Transit 
System 

THAT 
NUMBER 

TO 
CALL IS 

555-5555 



(Floosie) and I were just sitting 
there gettig a tan, when this 
big green-headed duck came 
up like he wanted us to feed 
him. I didn't realize that he 
took that literally." 

Wildlife officials have 
placed high level calls intothe 
local cosa Nostra ex- 
termination society to find a 
skilled person to rid NSZoo of 
the problem. 

But even this solution meets 



with big objections. Said Dr. 
Vegetablegarden, "What we 
need is to shoot them' with 
tranquilizers, and take them 
into our laboratories and 
study them and find out 
exactly what the problem is." 

"We don't need more 
killing," Vegetablegarden 
said, "what we need is to find 
out what is making these 
ducks so vicious and work 




If you are ever stranded in a place 
far from your dormitory or 
apartment feel free to call the 

Wacky Transit System 

and enjoy the worry free 

ride with one 
of our many trust worthy drivers 

together to find the problem." ————— » — —m » w » *********** 



Vice-President of 
Finance E.T. Trite 
Confiscates Funds 

"Shocked!", was the 
response Student's Over Bored 
President Hanes Breefs had to 
Vice-President of Finance 
E.T. Trite's seizure of S.O.B. 
student-assessed fees to help 
pay the university's bills. 

A spokesman for Trite's 
office said, "Trite was upset 
to find out that the students 
who ran S.O.B. were able to 
keep their books balanced." 

Trite was unavailable for 
comment, but Clark Smith, a 
graduated assistant doing a 
practicum for Trite said thai 
Trite was out foreclosing on 
students who were late on their 
dorm rent. 

Bob Willy Gonzalez, 
Director of Student Activities 
and owner of the world 
famous "Taco Heaven" 
franchises, said he was 
prepared to negotiate with 
Trite. Gonzalez claimed that 
he offered Trite a 50-50 
partnership in his Taco 
Heaven franchise. Trite turned 
down the offer. 

Gonzalez said Trite did 
accept his offer to a "winnei 
take all" golf match. Ac- 
cording to the agreement, it 
Trite were to win the match, 
the university would seize the 
student funds for a period of 
three years. If Gonzalez were 
to win, the students keep the 
money. 

Gonzalez said that he was 
not afraid to play Trite. He 
added, "E.T. was apparently 
unaware when he signed the 
match aggreement that I had 
built the Wreck Complex golf 
course near my home so I 
would be able to play golf 
alot. 

He further added, "I have 
been trying to get out of the 
office for weeks but my 
secretary keeps finding things 
for me to do. At least I can 
claim this as a business 
meeting. 

Hickory dickory dock, 
three mice ran up a clock, 
the clock struck one, 
and the other two escaped with 
minor injuries. 



Current Sausage Lampoon, Page 3 



lite* Victim 




An Unidentified NSZoo student looks horrified 
as NSZoo Infirmary Nurse, Winnefred Hottang 
tells him that he is another one of the 700 NSZoo 



students who have been infected with that 
horrorifying new disease, Red Herpes. (NSZoo 
photo by Lisa Syffullu 



Mystery Disease Mysteriously Afflicts NSZoo 



State Health Department 
officials from across the state 
were buzzing the NSZoo 
campus this past week as well 
as several other college 
campuses across the state, 
including our neighbor to the 
north-La. Disco-Tech, in a 
effort to halt a potentially 
fatal outbreak of a new strain 
of disease-Red Herpes. 

As of Press time, the major 
outbreak was reaching 
epidemic proportions, but 
Health Department officials 
had been only partially suc- 
cessful in quarrantining off 
most of the victims. 

A college co-ed at an' 
unknown Baptist University in* 
the west somewhere, was< 
subjected too, and eventually, 
contacted {his new strain of, 
Herpes when she ws a guest at 
a party somewhere on the 
campus of her college. 



A week later, before the 
symptoms appeared, she was 
at a party thrown by members 
of a local sorority at NSZoo, 
at a retreat just outside of 
Natchitoches somewhere in 
the woods. 

When she returned to 
college back west, she became 
sick and developed numerous 
red spots all over her face, and 
especially around the mouth 
area. 

It was at this point that 
State Health Department 
officials were called in, and 
when they diagnosed the 



problem, they alerted officials contact of Red Herpes hit the 
here at NSZoo to the problem. NSZoo campus. 



However, things only 
worsened when officials 
discovered that shortly after 
being exposed to this new 
strain, the members of the 
local sorority had an "ex- 
change" with a local 
fraternity, and at least 50 more 
cases were reported within a 
week. 

It took State Health 
Department Officials over 
three weeks do determine 
exactly who has ben in contact 
with whom since the first 



When officials finally 
determined exactly who had 
been in contact with whom- 
some 712 separate cases at this 
writing, they got a tip that a 
case of Red Herpes had 
developed at La. Disco-Tech. 

According to quarrantined 
sources, one of the sorority 
girls had been in contact with a 
student from Disco-Tech and 
thus, had infected him. 

Other cases were reported at 
LSU, NLU, SLU, MSU, ICU, 
and IOU. 



Schedule Of SGA Elections-Spring 1983 




Tuesday April 22-- 
Wednesday April 23-- 
Thursday April 24-- 
Friday April 25- 
Monday April 28- 
Tuesday April 29- 
Wednesday April 30— 
Thursday April 31— 
Friday May 1— 
Monday May 4— 
Tuesday May 5- 
Wednesday May 6— 
Thursday May 7— 
Friday May 8- 
Monday May 11-- 
Tuesday May 12- 
Wednesday May 13— 
Thursday May 14— 
Friday May 15- 



SGA President, Vice-President 
The Rest of the Executive Bunch 
SGA Senators-at-Large 
SUGB Representatives-at-Large 
Mr. NSZoo 
Miss NSZoo 
Mrs. NSZoo 
Who's Who 

Who's Whom (English majors only) 

Pre-Homecoming Court (self-nominated) 

National Election Holiday 

SGA Sr. Class Senators 

SGA Jr. Class Senators 

SGA Soph. Class Senators 

SGA Legal Holiday— No Elections 

Referendum To Impeach NSZoo President 

Miss Black NSZoo 

Miss White NSZoo 

Miss Saudi Arabian NSZoo 



Current Sausage 
Literary Page 

Page 4 

Tkt Currant Stat* lampoon EdHioa It trirrttd tnHrtty for Hit tojoymtirt and- 
-lat titttrtalnMtirt of tht rrtdtnti, fataHy, and ttaff of NSU. I* rottmMtaet 
or rtbttowMt bthwin any »f tht ttrttnt dtticttd i* Hit ttoriot or tletarot, 
tutkt for Hit turtou of ttHro, U parol, dumb lack. 



Literary Stuff 



Current Sausage Explains 
The True Meaning of Recent 
Editorials and Shows All 
The Facts Supporting Them 



"Quitting 



snap!' 

"I'm gonna help you 
break the cigarette habit 
with my 'Larry Hagman 
Special Stop Smokin' 
Wrist Snappin' Red Rub- 
ber Band.' Get one free 
from your American 
Cancer Society." 



AMERICAN 
'CANCER 

socmr 





w 11 



ONE NIGHT IN A LIVING ROOM 

ii w 





What's the matter, Dear . . cat got your tongue?? 




Guest Editorial 



An old Russian peasent was 
going along the road one 
wintry day when he spied upon 
a bird dead, or so he thought, 
he picked it up and was about 
to throw it away when he felt a 
faint heartbeat. He chanced 
upon a cow, who, had just left 
a large pudding. 

The Russian buried the bird 
up to his neck in the hot 
manure and went away. The 
trick worked, the bird revived, 
and started to sing. 

A passing wolf heard the 
singing and dug him out of the 
manure and ate him up. This 
is the end, but like all Russian 
stories there is a moral. 1st- 
whoever puts you in it, is not 
neccessarily your enemy. 2nd- 



whoever pulls you out, is not, 
neccessarily your friend, 3rd- 
lf your in it up to your neck. 
Please, Don't sing about it! 



Letter To The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

What do you do to 
elephant with three balls? 



an 



Sincerely, 
Dr. Seuss 

Dear Dr. Seuss, 

Walk him and pitch to the 
giraffe - Ed. 




Vou Don't Read 
The SAUCE j 



Current Sausage Lampoon. Pape 5 




NSZoo President Dr. J.J. Orgy, looks traumatic 

moments after the State Bored of Collegiate 
Trustees extended his contract four more years. 



Orgy's Contract Renewed For 
Four More Wonderful Years 



NSZoo President Dr. J.J. 
Orgy's contract was renewed 
for four more year's yester- 
day, despite vigorous pleas 
against it by the NSZoo head. 
Immediately after the contract 
extension, which included a 
pay raise for hazardous duty, 
Orgy broke down in front of 
reporters and had to be 
restrained from attacking the 
members of the Bored of 
Trustees. 

Orgy, who has been secretly 
trying for sometime to get out 
of his present contract, was 
reportedly resting comfortably 
in an undisclosed Baton Rouge 
hospital. 

Orgy was informed earliet 
this week that he was wanted 
to appear before the Bored 



"Sex Toys" To Perform Here In Concert 
As Part of Christmas Festival Activities 



yesterday to discuss his 
contract. 

Confident that he would be 
freed of his contract, Orgy had 
planned a victory vacation to 
the Bahamas with his family. 

When the members of the 
Bored told him that he had 
done such a fine job saving the 
slate money by cutting all but 
six of NSZoo's slate-funded 
programs, Orgy broke down 
and cried. 

Knowing that the inevitable 
renewal was coming, Orgy sat 
motionless and silent as the 
verdict was reached. 

Attempts to get through to 
Dr. Orgy today proved futile 
and the hospital was holding 
all calls. 



The "Sex Toys", punk- 
dom's newest new wave smash 
supergroup, has been signed to 
be the lead act for the 1983 
Christmas Festival concert to 
be held at Rather Coliseum. 

Just back from an extended 
tour in Cuba, Niearauga, 
Afghanistan, the Soviet 
Union, and San Francisco, the 
Sex Toys are currently in the 
studio making a follow-up to 
i heir recently released triple 
platinum album, "How To 
Make Babies Using Whips and 
Chains." 

The supergroup's firs) 
album, "Come In Through 
The Back Door", was hailed 
by critics as a new 
breakthrough in musical 
circles. 

Student Onion Governing 
Bored's 2nd Vice-President-in- 
Charge-of-the-lsl Vice-Presi- 
dents-Secondary- Duties, Fl- 
ames Floyd said thai i he- 
supergroup was extremely 
difficult to get. 

"It cost us over $75,000 to 
sign them, but they're worth 
it. Their music appeals to all 
• types of students; Black, 
While, male, female, and the 
in-beiweens. I think we can all 
relate to their style," Flames 
said. 

NSZoo Moral Majority 



NSZoo Registrar I. Will 
Fudgeit, announced yesterday 
that enrollment at the NSZoo- 
Natchitoches campus jumped 
to a record 17,806 students, 
taking the PiPS students and 
all faculty and staff into 
account. 

Dr. Fudgeit said that the 
count of over 17,000, was 
above the previous record of 
16,983 recorded during the 
Fall semester when both the 
students, faculty, staff were 
first recorded. 

Meanwhile, NSZoo Vice- 
President of Financial Affairs, 
Dr. E.T. Trite said that with 
the increase in enrollment, 
NSZoo could expect another 
*1 million dollars in revenues, 
an d that NSZoo students 
would no longer have to pay to 
take showers in the dorms, 
tast fall Trite installed Pay- 



a measures to gain some much 
needed revenues here. 

Dr. Trite also loosened 
measures that previously 
required all registering NSZoo 
students to pledge their first 
born child and a son-to- 
benamed later as collateral in 
case their student loans were 
not repayed. 

Back in Dr. Fudgeit's of- 
fice, workers were confidently 
predicting a record Summer 
enrollment of almost 10,000 
students. Dr. Fudgeit's 
secretary, Betty Squealer said 
that the Registrar's office 
would then be counting the 
students that would be coming 
in to Inside View and the ones 
who would be enrolling in the 
new High School for the 
. Gifted and Talented. 



* — -^x 




The "Sex Toys", the new wave smash group 
from San Francisco will perform in Rather 
Colesium as part of the Christmas Festival 
concert. (Photo by Melanie Daigle) 



leader, Thoushall Knoll said "My Mother is a Space Cadci- 
that he is going ie> star I a -|'cr Sure". 

"We as students should not 
be subjected to this kind ol 
i in m or a I a bu sc ft o n 



protest aimed at finding 
someone else 10 be the guest's 
at the concert . 

He reportedly has suggested 
Moon Unit and Dwce/il 
Zappa, children of the 
legendary Frank Zappa. Moem 
Unit and Dwec/il recently 
released their smash single. 



degenerates such 
Toys. 1 for one, 
opposed lo this 
lerlaintnenl, and 
something about 
said. 



as | he Sex 
am fiimh 

ype of en- 
I will elo 
it " Knoll 



New Health Spa Opens On Banks of lake 



NSZoo Announces Record Enrollment 

showers in all of the dorms as 



The grand opentn 
ceremony of the new 
Chaplains' Lake Health Spa 
ard Resort will take place 
Sunday, April 10 at p.m. near 
the East end of Choplin's 
Lake across from menuned 
housing. 

It was decided to turn 
Chaplains Lake into a health 
spa after a research of the 
sludge showed that it was 
composed of natural 
ingredients that are helpful to 
clear, young, healthy skin. 
The chemical makeup of the 
sludge was discovered to be 
48% aloe vera, 18% vitamin 
E, 12% animal proteins, 12% 
natural spring water, and 10% 
cocoa butter. 

NSZoo was offered a 
mineral rights lease worth 1.7 
million dollars from Johns 
and Johns. They wanted to 
market the contents of 
Chaplains' Lake in a skin 
refreshing cleanser called 
sludge. Dr. J.J. Orgy refused 
the offer stating he would not 
accept less than 4 million 
dollars for such a lease. He 
feels NSZoo could possibly 
lose a great deal of money wth 
an ofer of anything less 
because if any other valuable 
mineral was discovered they 
would have the rights to it 
also. Dr. Orgy also added that 
had he been able to receive the 
4 million dollars he would 
have liked to have Caldwell 
Hall rebuilt. 



Dr. Orgy announced that he 
would like to make Chaplains' 
Lake into part of a large 
health resort. The slude area 
would be used as mud baths 
and a spa. Sailing, canoing, 
and water skiing will be of- 
fered on the upper end of 
Chaplains' Lake and Lake 
Sibley. The recreation 
complex facilities will be used 
as are, however, a second pool 
and golf course will be added. 
The equine science department 
has offered the use of the 
stables for the purpose of 
riding. 

Dr. Orgy has been working 
with city officials in adding the 
resort to the campus. Nai- 



Stig Duh Acquires Varnado 



chitoches is fully supporting 
NSZoo and will be resonsiblc 
for the building of the second 
pool and golf course that will 
be added to the recreation 
complex. There will also be a 
new holel thai will be built 
near Lake Sibley. 

Full time students will have 
access to any of the services 
offered by the resort as long as 
they are enrolled. Residents of 
Natchitoches will be able to 
receive memberships with 
discounts for activities. Year- 
round membership will cost 
$1,800. A two week vacation 
at the spa with a full schedule 
of activities will cost ap- 
proximately $1200. 



The new Chapter of Stigma 
Duh Gamma President 
'Snuff" Albe.te announced 
Monday, plans to acquire 
Varnado Hall from NSZoo- 
Stigma Duh Gamma was able 
to obtain the dorm under the 
homestead clause in the 1803 
Louisiana Purchase 
Agreement. In the document, 
a clause exists that allows any 
non-profit organization that 
has resided on Government 
property for 50 years to 
acquire any structure they 
have occupied for at least 3 
years. 

Director of Student Services 
Sam Spade hailed the 
acquisition as an "excellent 



way for the university to rid 
itself of the burden of old 
dorms." 

Stig Duh's future plans for 
the dorm consist of having 
members live on its east side. 
As a way to finance the costs 
of maintaining Varnado, the 
fraternity will open a brothel 
on the west wing of the dorm. 
Future plans also include 
expanding the downstairs 
basement of the dorm into a 
casino. 

Stigma Duh gamma has 
been without a house since 
1980 when they sold the 
structure they owned on Pine 
Street. 



Nr. 



-"Co Fish"— 



S»in-the-Bottle 

— Tiddly Winks — 

SPORTS 



— Checkers — 



Current Sausage Lampoon 
Page 6 



NSZoo Refuses NCAA Bid, 0(Hs Te Play 
Philadelphia 76ers In Superdome Showdown 



McRne McNamed 
McSistant McCoach 



The NSZoo Demons today 
refused a bid by the National 
Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA) to play 
in the 1983 basketball tour- 
nament which will determine 
the No. 1 ranked team in the 
United States. 

The NSZoo squad, coming 
off a 31-0 year, and defeating 



NSZoo Athletic Director 
I.M. Powerful announced the 
hiring of a seventh assistant 
football coach for the 1983-84 
year. The coach, Buxom 
MeFine will be in char.geo/' 
physical conditioning for the 
NSZoo football team. 

Miss MeFine was previously 
coaching at Playboy Slate 
University in Las Vegas, but 
left l he staff for personal 
reasons. 

Demon A.D., Powerful, 
said he saw her in the latest 
issue of PLAYHOUSE, a 
football magazine for "that 
coach who wants to know all 
the plays." 

Powerful said that he was 
inspired by her background 
and her knowledge of physical 
conditioning. He placed a call 
to her Malibu beachouse, and 
flew out there the next day 
with a contract. 

Several NSZoo football 
team members were a little 
cautious at the signing of the 
new assistal coach. One, 
senior offensive lineman Spike 
Grinnarl that he was kind of 
"apprehensive" of the new 
coach. 

"She has kind of a tough 
reputation," he said, "I really 
don't know if any of us will be 




able to handle her, and her 
trailing regimen." 

MeFine will reportedly 
come lo NSZoo after the first 



of June, to start the NSZoo 
football team on their con- 
ditioning. Powerful is ex- 
pected back in two weeks. 



NSZoo Whips USC Behind Shutout 
Pitching And Two Key NSZoo RBI's 

Tkr»» M«7aa nll.-horr ... ... ■ 



Three NSZoo pitchers 
limited the University of 
Southern California (USC) to 
two hits en route to a 2-0 
NSZoo win over the No. 1 
ranked team in the NCAA. 

Starting pitcher and winner, 
Spike Vienna went five innings 
giving up only one hit, but 
gave way to Scott Muskrat 
after walking the first two 
batters in the sixth inning. 
Muskrat retired the side, but 
he was lifted after he walked 
the first batter in the seventh 
and the next batter added a 
double to put men in scoring 
position. 

Kevin Forewarned then 
came in to get the final outs to 
earn the save against the USC 
ballclub. 

NSZoo opened the scoring 
in the bottom of the second 
when second baseman Steven 
Billygoat singled and ad- 
vanced to second on a wild 
pitch. Centerfiekjer Gil 



Hernia added a single that 
brought in Billygoat with the 
games first run. 

In the fifth, first basemen 
Lane Stupo lined a double 
down the right field line and 



catcher Sower Grapes slapped 
a single to center scoring 
Stupo. 

Win the win, NSZoo moves 
to 32-2 while USC, suffering 
its first loss, drops to 35-1 . 



Stupo, Oliver-Smith Power NSZoo 
To Defeated of Undefeated UNO 



Lane Stupo hit a grand slam 
home run, and Diamond Jim 
Oliver-Smith added three 
doubles and five RBI in his 
first game since coming off a 
near career ending injury, to 
propel the NSZoo baseball 
team to its 20th straight 
victory, a 14-5 shellacking of 
previously undefeated and 
12th ranked University of New 
Orleans. 

NSZoo plays 9th ranked 
Oklahoma State in a 
doubleheader tomorrow 
afternoon. 

Stupo's home run came with 



one out in the fifth inning and 
the score tied 5-5. Moments 
later, with two out and 
runners on second and third, 
Oliver-Smith lashed a 3-2 
fastball to deep centerfield and 
the score ws 1 1-5, NSZoo. 

Oliver-Smith added two 
more RBI in the top of the 
seventh with his third double, 
this one to right field, to finish 
the scoring. 

NSZoo's starting- pitcher 
John Barnyard went the 
distance striking out nine and 
allowing just three earned 
runs. 



the University of Arkansas- 
Little Big Horn 108-63 in the 
finals of the Trans America 
Athletic Conference (TAAC) 
basketball tournament, have 
instead accepted a challenge to 
play the Philadelphia 76ers in 
the New Orleans Superdom in 
a charity game that will also 
determine which team is really 
the best team in America. 

NSZoo basketball coach X. 
Proe, said that 76ers President 
Newton Feldmen called him 
last week and challenged him 
to the game. According to 
Proe, the challenge came just 
moments after the 76ers had 
defeated the Los Angeles 
Lakers 119-87 to sweep their 
best of seven NBA Cham- 
pionship series 4-0. The 76ers 
finished the regular season 
with a 70-12 record, and didn't 
lose a single game in the 
playoffs. 

Proe said that he discussed 
the situation wit